The Flu Killed 7 Children Last Week – but It’s Hitting Baby Boomers Even Harder

This year’s severe flu season brought at least seven more pediatric deaths in the past week – bringing the total to 37 so far this season. Baby Boomers, however, are among the hardest hit, with an unusually high rate of hospitalizations this year, according to CDC officials. “Baby Boomers have higher rates [of hospitalization] than their grandchildren right now,” CDC Influenza Division Director Dr. Dan Jernigan said during a call with reporters Friday. During a typical flu season, elderly adults see the highest rate of hospitalizations, followed by young children. But this year, Jernigan said, adults between the ages of 50 and 64 are occupying the second spot, perhaps because that population is seeing infections resulting from both the widely circulating, severe H3N2 virus, as well as the H1N1 virus. Patients of all ages are reporting cases of the flu this year. Jernigan said the 2017-2018 flu season is on pace with the high severity season of 2014-2015, which resulted in approximately 34 million cases of influenza and some 710,000 hospitalizations. This year’s flu season is expected to yield similar numbers, Jernigan said. Jernigan also said the pediatric death total, which is at 37 after the latest report, may account for as few as half of the actual number of fatalities, since more cases tend to be reported retroactively as causes of death are confirmed by medical examiners and coroners. More deaths are also likely to occur as flu season pres...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized CDC flu season flu season 2018 healthytime influenza medicine onetime public health Source Type: news

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This study investigated the prevalence of IAV in commercial swine herds. A total of 1,878 oral fluid samples were collected from pigs of all ages from 201 commercial farms located in North Carolina and South Carolina. Sixty-eight oral fluid samples from 35 farms were positive by MP gene PCR with an overall IAV-positivity of 3.6%. On the herd level, the percentage of IAV positivity was 17.4%. Fifty-six viruses were subtyped, while 12 were partly subtyped or not subtyped at all. Using de novo assembly, complete sequences were obtained for 59 HA genes. The majority of IAVs subtyped had an H1 HA demonstrating a considerable pr...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
AbstractSwine influenza viruses (swIAVs) are known to persist endemically in farrow-to-finish pig farms, leading to repeated swine flu outbreaks in successive batches of pigs at a similar age (mostly around 8  weeks of age). This persistence in European swine herds involves swIAVs from European lineages including H1avN1, H1huN2, H3N2, the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus and their reassortants. The specific population dynamics of farrow-to-finish pig farms, the immune status of the animals at infection-time, the co-circulation of distinct subtypes leading to consecutive or concomitant infections have been evidenced as factors...
Source: Veterinary Research - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Conclusion Further testing in larger trials needs to be done to be sure these initial results hold true and that the vaccine patch is safe and effective. This is the first time these flu microneedle patches have been tested on humans, and the study was relatively small, with only 100 participants. But if the results are confirmed, this new method of delivering the flu vaccination could make a big difference. The patches could have several main advantages over traditional injections: they may be preferred by people who dislike needles and avoid vaccination because of the fear of pain it may be quicker and easier to admi...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Medication Swine flu Source Type: news
Conclusion This study has identified a substance in the mucus secreted by a south Indian frog which can kill certain types of flu virus. Researchers often turn to natural substances with known health-giving properties to find potential new drugs for humans. For example, aspirin was developed based on a compound found in willow bark – which had been used in traditional medicine for hundreds of years. Some other drugs – such as some chemotherapy and anticlotting drugs – have also been developed from chemicals found in plants. By isolating the substances that have an effect the researchers can make sure...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medication Medical practice Source Type: news
ConclusionsOur results demonstrate circulation of IAV throughout Guatemala and identify commercial farms, animal health status, and age as potential risk factors associated with IAV infection and exposure. Detection of human‐origin viruses in pigs suggests a role for humans in the molecular epidemiology of IAV in swine in Guatemala and evidences gaps in local animal and human surveillance.
Source: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL ARTICLE Source Type: research
Conclusion This modelling study shows how the strains of influenza A – "bird flu" – circulating when a person is born give them lifelong protection against new subtypes with the same H protein groups. The researchers call this immune imprinting. This may help to explain the high severity and mortality rate seen among certain groups. For example, the massive flu pandemic of 1918 was an H1N1 strain. This had a very high fatality rate among young adults, which the researchers consider may have been because when they were born (between 1880 and 1900), H3 was the dominant strain. Therefore they had no prot...
Source: NHS News Feed - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Medical practice Source Type: news
ConclusionsOur results demonstrate circulation of IAV throughout Guatemala, and identify commercial farms, animal health status and age as potential risk factors associated to IAV infection and exposure. Detection of human‐origin viruses in pigs suggests a role for humans in the molecular epidemiology of IAV in swine in Guatemala and evidences gaps in local animal and human surveillance.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Source: Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses - Category: Virology Authors: Tags: Original Article Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 7 September 2016 Source:Veterinary Microbiology Author(s): Maria Serena Beato, Luca Tassoni, Adelaide Milani, Annalisa Salviato, Guido Di Martino, Monica Mion, Lebana Bonfanti, Isabella Monne, Simon James Watson, Alice Fusaro In August 2012 repeated respiratory outbreaks caused by swine influenza A virus (swIAV) were registered for a whole year in a breeding farm in northeast Italy that supplied piglets for fattening. The virus, initially characterized in the farm, was a reassortant Eurasian avian-like H1N1 (H1avN1) genotype, containing a haemagglutinin segment derived from the pandemic ...
Source: Veterinary Microbiology - Category: Veterinary Research Source Type: research
Vincent AL Abstract Whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccines are widely used in the swine industry to reduce clinical disease against homologous influenza A virus (IAV) infection. In pigs experimentally challenged with antigenically distinct heterologous IAV of the same hemagglutinin subtype, WIV vaccinates have been shown to develop vaccine-associated enhanced respiratory disease (VAERD). We evaluated the impact of vaccine valency, age at vaccination, and duration between vaccination and challenge on development of VAERD using vaccine containing δ1-H1N2 and challenge with pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) virus. Pigs we...
Source: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Authors: Tags: Clin Vaccine Immunol Source Type: research
Conclusion Prevention of swine influenza has 3 components: prevention in swine, prevention of transmission to humans, and prevention of its spread among humans. Because of limited treatment options, high risk for secondary infection, and frequent need for intensive care of individuals with H1N1 pneumonia, environmental control, including vaccination of high-risk populations and public education are critical to control of swine influenza out breaks.
Source: Annals of Global Health - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
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