New app helps parents track and encourage their child ’s development

Follow me on Twitter @drClaire Most parents, at some time or another, wonder whether their child is doing everything they are supposed to do. Are they ahead of other children? Are they behind? Is their development normal? Now there is a really good app for that. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released a new free app called the Milestone Tracker. It has five components: A detailed “Milestone Checklist.” For children ages 2 months through 5 years, it goes through all the different milestones for that age (when I tried it out for a 12-month-old, there were 27 milestones) so parents can see if their child has reached them. To make it easier for parents to understand and decide, there are photos and videos that explain the milestones. “When to Act Early.” For each age, the app lists warning signs that warrant a call to the doctor. For example, for a 12-month-old some warning signs include not crawling, not standing when supported, not pointing — and losing milestones the child previously had. While these warning signs don’t necessarily mean there is a serious problem, they should be checked out. My favorite, “Tips and Activities.” It gives parents concrete, practical, and fun suggestions for encouraging their child’s development. Children learn best through interaction and play. The suggestions are geared for what children need and enjoy at each age. The “Milestone Quick View.” This lists the mi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Children's Health Parenting Source Type: blogs

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Publication date: September 2020Source: Research in Developmental Disabilities, Volume 104Author(s): Jennifer M. Glennon, Hana D’Souza, Luke Mason, Annette Karmiloff-Smith, Michael S.C. Thomas
Source: Research in Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Source Type: research
Publication date: September 2020Source: Research in Developmental Disabilities, Volume 104Author(s): Jenna H. Beffel, Amy K. Nuttall
Source: Research in Developmental Disabilities - Category: Disability Source Type: research
Despite its impact on everyday functioning, spatial perspective-taking has rarely been investigated in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and previous findings are surprisingly sparse and inconsistent. In the present study, we aimed to investigate spatial perspective-taking abilities in children and adolescents with ASD without intellectual disabilities, comparing them with a group of typically developing (TD) peers. Our objectives were: (i) to test similarities and differences between these groups in a spatial perspective-taking task; and (ii) to see whether similar or different underlying processes (i.e., fine and gross mo...
Source: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience - Category: Neuroscience Source Type: research
Psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder, are common conditions that arise as a result of complex and heterogeneous combinations of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to childhood neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism and intellectual disability, there are no clinical practice guidelines for applying genetic testing in the context of these conditions. But genetic counseling and genetic testing are not synonymous, and people who live with psychiatric disorders and their family members are often interested in what psychiatric genetic counseling can offer. Furt...
Source: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Genetic Counseling: Clinical Practice and Ethical Considerations PERSPECTIVES Source Type: research
American Journal of Psychiatry,Volume 177, Issue 6, Page 473-475, June 01, 2020.
Source: American Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
In this study, we evaluated three lessons from a manualized social play skills intervention, Play20. Play20 is a focused intervention that is designed to improve early social skill development in children with autism spectrum disorder through naturalistic play. First, we evaluated the procedural fidelity of instructor implementation of Play20, and we also evaluated the effects of an added instructor self-monitoring checklist in further improving instructor behavior. Finally, we evaluated the effects of Play20 on child play outcomes. Instructor procedural fidelity increased in the presence of the Play20 lessons, and further...
Source: Journal of Developmental and Physical Disabilities - Category: Disability Source Type: research
Abstract Six articles in the June 2020 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry address the overall construct of cognition. These articles have a broad connection to cognition, which is itself a broad concept. From the experimental psychology perspective, cognition is the set of processes associated with attending, learning, knowing, and remembering. From the clinical perspective, a number of neuropsychiatric conditions are defined by the presence of cognitive impairment, with onset ranging from childhood, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and intellectual disability, to later life, such as demen...
Source: The American Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Am J Psychiatry Source Type: research
PMID: 32475140 [PubMed - in process]
Source: The American Journal of Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Am J Psychiatry Source Type: research
Plena inclusi ón (Full Inclusion) is Spain's leading NGO on Intellectual Disability and other Developmental Disabilities. It is made up of nearly 900 family-based non-profit organizations throughout the country. Full inclusion offers lifelong support to 140,000 people with Developmental Disabilities (DD) (Intell ectual Disability, Autism Spectrum Disorder and Cerebral Palsy) and their families.
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
I would like to thank Mr. Galvan for his letter (1). He works for an outstanding organization that we have had the opportunity to collaborate with many times over the years, and even now during this pandemic. However, there are some points in his letter that need clarification regarding my paper in Biological Psychiatry (2). In response to Mr. Galvan ’s comment that the government has not allowed people with intellectual disabilities or autism to go out in the streets, I need only literally translate the government’s mandate: “The activity of using public roads authorized in order to assist and care for t...
Source: Biological Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research
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