Drugstore pain pills as effective as opioids in ER patients - AP

Emergency rooms are where many patients are first introduced to powerful opioid painkillers, but what if doctors offered over-the-counter pills instead? A new study tested that approach on patients with broken bones and sprains and found pain relievers sold as Tylenol and Motrin worked as well as opioids at reducing severe pain.The results challenge common ER practice for treating short-term, severe pain and could prompt changes that would help prevent new patients from becoming addicted.The study has limitations: It only looked at short-term pain relief in the emergency room and researchers didn't evaluate how patients managed their pain after leaving the hospital.But given the scope of the U.S. opioid epidemic — more than 2 million Americans are addicted to opioid painkillers or heroin — experts say any dent in the problem could be meaningful.Results were published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.Long-term opioid use often begins with a prescription painkiller for short-term pain, and use of these drugs in the ER has risen in recent years. Previous studies have shown opioids were prescribed in nearly one-third of ER visits and about 1 out of 5 ER patients are sent home with opioid prescriptions."Preventing new patients from becoming addicted to opioids may have a greater effect on the opioid epidemic than providing sustained treatment to patients already addicted," Dr. Demetrios Kyriacou, an emergency medicine specialist ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

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Deaths from opioid overdoses have increased dramatically over the last decade. In 2017, the latest year for which the U.S. government has statistics on the trend, more than 47,000 Americans died of opioid overdoses. One major factor contributing to the rising number of people who get addicted to opioids and die from overdoses is the increasing number of prescriptions written by doctors to treat pain. Overdose deaths related to such prescriptions increased five times from 1999 to 2017. But according to the latest study looking at opioid prescribing patterns, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, recent efforts t...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs Source Type: news
Zach (left) and Bob (right) According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than 70,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2017, including illicit drugs and prescription opioids, a two-fold increase in a decade. Opioids include prescription opioids and methadone, heroin, and other synthetic narcotics like fentanyl. Bob Paff has directly suffered the casualties of this epidemic. On January 21 of this year he lost his son Zach to an accidental overdose of fentanyl. A highly sought-after communications expert, business leader, and internationally recognized author, Bob now uses his communications platform to bring ...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction General Recovery Stigma Opioid Epidemic Opioids Suicide synthetic fentanyl Source Type: blogs
Executives from Purdue Pharma, the manufacturer of the powerful opioid painkiller OxyContin, admitted in federal court in 2007 that Purdue’s marketing practices and interactions with doctors had understated the strength and addictive potential of the drug — an omission that many experts believe contributed to an opioid epidemic that claimed nearly 50,000 American lives in 2017 alone. But on Thursday, the release of a previously sealed deposition from 2015 showed that Purdue executives knew of OxyContin’s strength long before that $600 million settlement. The deposition, which had been filed in court, reve...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Drugs healthytime onetime Source Type: news
The role of neurologists in tackling the opioid epidemic, Published online: 21 February 2019; doi:10.1038/s41582-019-0146-8The opioid crisis constitutes a public health challenge at the intersection of two interrelated medical problems — opioid addiction and chronic pain. In this Perspectives article, Volkow and Koroschetz discuss how neurologists are uniquely positioned to help address the opioid crisis.
Source: Nature Reviews Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Source Type: research
The cell phone blares out reveille. Your eyes open reluctantly and you realize it’s morning, having only gone to bed four hours earlier because of a late-night party. You creak out of bed to ready yourself for work, arthritic joints hurting much more than usual. A painful day lies ahead even after taking ibuprofen. Does this sound familiar? If it does, you are not alone. Nearly 70% of Americans report getting insufficient sleep on a regular basis, and approximately 20% of Americans suffer from chronic pain. Recently, the intersection between these two conditions has become more apparent. The association between sleep...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Fatigue Pain Management Sleep Source Type: blogs
(Natural News) The opioid epidemic that is currently plaguing the United States is no longer a secret; millions of citizens across the nation are struggling with an addiction to the prescription painkillers. One of the primary defenses for these often-harmful drugs is that so many people take them to relieve unyielding and insufferable pain. But...
Source: NaturalNews.com - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Conclusions: Our results suggest Medicaid expansion benefited a population with unique needs, and that Medicaid expansion could be a valuable tool in addressing the opioid overdose epidemic.
Source: Medical Care - Category: Health Management Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research
Authors: Mercadante S Abstract INTRODUCTION: In the last few decades, the consumption of opioid analgesics in many countries, particularly the US, has dramatically increased. This rise has been paralleled by a proportional number of opioid-related deaths. Areas covered: The development of opioid guidelines was a response to this health crisis with the intention of reducing the risk of harm related to opioid prescribing. These guidelines have received varying responses ranging from support to criticism. Pain physicians may often provide multidimensional management as the paradigm for responsible opioid treatment. In...
Source: Expert Opinion on Drug Safety - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Drug Saf Source Type: research
Surgery and pain pills used to go hand in hand. After all, you need a strong prescription pain medication to ensure you aren’t in pain after a procedure, right? Turns out not only is prescription pain medication not always needed, but often not advisable after surgery, because it can raise the risk of opioid addiction. As a result, surgeons today are rethinking post-surgical pain management strategies. And if you’re going under the knife, you should too. In the 1990s, the number of opioid prescriptions written for people undergoing surgery or experiencing pain conditions grew — and so did related problems...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Pain Management Surgery Source Type: blogs
By COLIN KONSCHAK, FACHE and DAVE LEVIN, MD  Dave Levin Colin Konschak The opioid crisis in the United States is having a devastating impact on individuals, their families, and the health care industry. This multi-part series will focus on the role technology can play in addressing this crisis. Part one of the series proposed a strategic framework for evaluating and pursuing technical solutions. A Framework for Innovation In part one of our series, we declared the opioid crisis an “All Hands-On Deck” moment and made the case that health IT (HIT) has a lot to offer. Given the many different possibilities, h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Tech Access to care Colin Konschak Dave Levin Divurgent Health IT Sansoro Health Source Type: blogs
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