Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures | NIH Common Fund
The goal of the Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures (A2CPS) program is to develop a set of objective biomarkers that provide"signatures" to predict if chronic pain is likely to develop after acute pain. Such signatures are greatly needed as prevention of chronic pain after an acute pain event is a major challenge in pain management. For most people, acute pain resolves as the injury that caused it heals. Yet in many other people, acute pain from an injury, surgery, or disease persists beyond the initial insult, and lasts for years or throughout life. The number of people who transition from acute to chronic pain aft...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 24, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

For some with chronic pain, the problem is not in their backs or knees but their brains - The Washington Post
After 36 agonizing years with sickle cell disease, Tesha Samuels is in complete remission — free, at least for now, of one of the most painful disorders known to medicine. Yet Samuels's body still hurts almost every day.The question that perplexes her doctors at the National Institutes of Health is why, after her blood disorder has been vanquished, she is still in pain.Perhaps her newly healed red blood cells are not yet bringing enough oxygen to her tissues. Perhaps the emotional toll of a lifetime of constant pain has left her prepared to feel little else. Or perhaps the pain signals that have flooded her brain...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 24, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

For Chronic Pain, Off-Label Naltrexone In Low Doses Seems To Help : Shots - Health News : NPR
Lori Pinkley, a 50-year-old from Kansas City, Mo., has struggled with puzzling chronic pain since she was 15.She's had endless disappointing visits with doctors. Some said they couldn't help her. Others diagnosed her with everything from fibromyalgia to lipedema to the rare Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.Pinkley has taken opioids a few times after surgeries but says they never helped her underlying pain."I hate opioids with a passion," Pinkley says."An absolute passion."Recently, she joined a growing group of patients using an outside-the-box remedy: naltrexone. It is usually used to treat addiction, in...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 24, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Opioid Crisis: Medical Schools Rethink How To Teach Students About Pain : Shots - Health News : NPR
The next generation of doctors will start their careers at a time when physicians are feeling pressure to limit prescriptions for opioid painkillers.Yet every day, they'll face patients who are hurting from injuries, surgical procedures or disease. Around 20% of adults in the U.S. live with chronic pain.That's why some medical students felt a little apprehensive as they gathered recently for a mandatory, four-day course at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore — home to one of the top medical schools in the country.The subject of the course? Pain."I initially was a bit scared and I guess a bit wary comin...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 19, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

I became a cyborg to manage my chronic pain | Popular Science
I don't remember what it feels like to live without pain. At 15, I began feeling aching, stabbing, and burning sensations in my lower back and down my legs. Swallowing a few Aleve didn't help —in fact, nothing did. If I sit or stand for any period of time, or lift something heavy or fall, I pay for it, sometimes for weeks or months. I've slept on the kitchen linoleum, because the carpet felt too soft to stand.For 17 years, I went to doctor after doctor, undergoing scans, physical therapy, and just about every"alternative" treatment that promised relief. Despite some amazing doctors and the expen...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 25, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll: Pain In America : Shots - Health News : NPR
At some point nearly everyone has to deal with pain.How do Americans experience and cope with pain that makes everyday life harder? We asked in the latest NPR-IBM Watson Health Poll.First, we wanted to know how often pain interferes with people's ability to work, go to school or engage in other activities. Overall, 18% of Americans say that's often a problem for them. Almost a quarter – 24% — say it's sometimes the case.The degree to which pain is a problem varies by age, with 22% of people 65 and older saying pain interferes often with their daily lives compared with only about 9% of people 35 and ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - August 23, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Canadian Pain Task Force Report: June 2019 - Canada.ca
The Canadian Pain Task Force was established in March 2019 to help the Government of Canada better understand and address the needs of Canadians who live with pain. Through to December 2021, the Task Force is mandated to provide advice and information to guide government decision-makers towards an improved approach to the prevention and management of chronic pain in this country. The eight Task Force members include people personally impacted by chronic pain, researchers, educators, and health professionals with experience and expertise in preventing and managing chronic pain across major professional disciplines (i.e., me...
Source: Psychology of Pain - July 18, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

What Was the Cause of the Excruciating Pain in His Shoulders and Hips? - The New York Times
As the physician prepared to leave the exam room, the patient's wife spoke up:"Doctor, my husband won't tell you this, but he is suffering," the woman said, her voice cracking. Dr. Timothy Quan, a rheumatologist in central Connecticut, looked at the 69-year-old man he'd been caring for over the past several months. The man gave a brisk nod. It was true. The past few weeks had been a nightmare of pain.Six months earlier, the patient woke up with a sore, swollen right hand. He figured he must have injured it a few days before when he cleared out a pile of wood in his backyard. He mentioned it to his pri...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 5, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

These Mole Rats Felt No Pain, Even From Wasabi ’s Burn - The New York Times
If you've ever taken a big bite of wasabi, you know what comes next: a painful zing that creeps over your whole scalp.You aren't the only animal that feels this way. The condiment's sinus-burning kick comes from a chemical compound called allyl isothiocyanate, or AITC, that actively damages proteins within cells. Flies and flatworms shun it, as do miceand wolf spiders."Practically every animal you look at will avoid AITC," said Gary Lewin, a molecular physiologist at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin.But there is one exception. In a paper published Thursday in Science, scie...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 31, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Millions Take Gabapentin for Pain. But There ’s Scant Evidence It Works. - The New York Times
One of the most widely prescribed prescription drugs, gabapentin, is being taken by millions of patients despite little or no evidence that it can relieve their pain.In 2006, I wrote about gabapentin after discovering accidentally that it could counter hot flashes.The drug was initially approved 25 years ago to treat seizure disorders, but it is now commonly prescribed off-label to treat all kinds of pain, acute and chronic, in addition to hot flashes, chronic cough and a host of other medical problems.The F.D.A. approves a drug for specific uses and doses if the company demonstrates it is safe and effective for its intend...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 22, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Why Does The Brain Connect Pain With Emotions? : Shots - Health News : NPR
When Sterling Witt was a teenager in Missouri, he was diagnosed with scoliosis. Before long, the curvature of his spine started causing chronic pain.It was"this low-grade kind of menacing pain that ran through my spine and mostly my lower back and my upper right shoulder blade and then even into my neck a little bit," Witt says.The pain was bad. But the feeling of helplessness it produced in him was even worse."I felt like I was being attacked by this invisible enemy," Witt says."It was nothing that I asked for, and I didn't even know how to battle it."So he channeled his frustration into ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 20, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

How Tiger Woods Won the Back Surgery Lottery - The New York Times
Few would have predicted that Tiger Woods would be playing in the P.G.A. Championship this week. He had three failed back surgeries, starting in 2014. He had taken opioids. His astonishing career seemed over.Then he had one more operation, a spinal fusion, the most complex of all, in 2017. And last month he won the Masters, playing the way he used to.An outcome like his from fusion surgery is so rare it is"like winning the lottery," Dr. Sohail K. Mirza, a spine surgeon at Dartmouth, said.The idea behind spinal fusion is to remove a disk — a ring of fibers filled with a nerve-cushioning jelly that joins adja...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 16, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Virtual Reality as Therapy for Pain - The New York Times
I was packing up at the end of a family vacation in Florida when my back went into an excruciating spasm unrelieved by a fistful of pain medication. As my twin sons, then 8 years old, wheeled me through the airport, one of them suggested,"Mom, if you think about something else, it won't hurt so much."At the time, I failed to appreciate the wisdom of his advice. Now, four decades later, a sophisticated distraction technique is being used to help patients of all ages cope with pain, both acute and chronic. The method, called Virtual Reality Therapy, goes beyond simple distraction, as might result from watching ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 29, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

National Pain Report – What You Don't Know Can Hurt You
The National Pain Report is the leading online news site dedicated to the coverage of chronic pain. We feature the latest developments in the treatment of chronic pain, public policy impacting chronic pain as well comments from leading pain specialists and columns from chronic pain sufferers.http://nationalpainreport.com/ (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 14, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Why the sexes don ’t feel pain the same way
Robert Sorge was studying pain in mice in 2009, but he was the one who ended up with a headache.At McGill University in Montreal, Canada, Sorge was investigating how animals develop an extreme sensitivity to touch. To test for this response, Sorge poked the paws of mice using fine hairs, ones that wouldn't ordinarily bother them. The males behaved as the scientific literature said they would: they yanked their paws back from even the finest of threads.But females remained stoic to Sorge's gentle pokes and prods1."It just didn't work in the females," recalls Sorge, now a behaviourist at the University ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 3, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Acute to Chronic Pain Signatures | NIH Common Fund
This program will develop a set of objective biomarkers that provide a"signature" to predict a transition from acute to chronic pain, in order to accelerate therapy development and ultimately to guide pain prevention strategies. These biomarkers are greatly needed as the number of people who transition from acute to chronic pain after an acute pain event is surprisingly high. This high prevalence of chronic pain in the US has in part contributed to the current opioid epidemic.A major challenge in pain management is preventing chronic pain from occurring after an acute pain event. For most people, acute pain resol...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 2, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

How Pain Tolerance and Anxiety Seem to Be Connected - The New York Times
An article this week about Jo Cameron, who has lived for 71 years without experiencing pain or anxiety because she has a rare genetic mutation, prompted questions from New York Times readers.The notion that the same gene could be responsible for the way a person processes physical and psychological pain left many perplexed: Aren't they totally different? Or does her story hint that sensitivity to one type of pain might be intertwined with sensitivity to another?Childbirth, Ms. Cameron said, felt like"a tickle." She often relies on her husband to alert her when she is bleeding, bruised or burned because nothin...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 1, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

At 71, She ’s Never Felt Pain or Anxiety. Now Scientists Know Why. - The New York Times
She'd been told that childbirth was going to be painful. But as the hours wore on, nothing bothered her — even without an epidural."I could feel that my body was changing, but it didn't hurt me," recalled the woman, Jo Cameron, who is now 71. She likened it to"a tickle." Later, she would tell prospective mothers,"Don't worry, it's not as bad as people say it is."It was only recently — more than four decades later — that she learned her friends were not exaggerating.Rather, there was something different about the way her body experienced pain: For the most part...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 1, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Opinion | Is Pain a Sensation or an Emotion? - The New York Times
The United States uses a third of the world's opioids but a fifth of Americans still say they suffer from chronic pain. The only demonstrable effect of two decades of widespread prescription of opioids has been catastrophic harm. With more than 47,000 Americans dying of opioid overdoses in 2017 and hundreds of thousandsmore addicted to them, it was recently reported that, for the first time, Americans were more likely to die of opioids than of car accidents.This has forced many to take a step back and ponder the very nature of pain, to understand how best to alleviate it.The ancient Greeks considered pain a passion &md...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 18, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Could The Cure For A Rare Chronic Pain Disorder Be ... More Pain? : Shots - Health News : NPR
There's a before, and there's an after.In the before, it was a relatively normal night. The kind of night any 14-year-old girl might have.Devyn ate dinner, watched TV and had small, unremarkable interactions with her family. Then, around 10 o'clock, she decided to turn in."I went to bed as I normally would, and then all of a sudden ... my hips... they just hurt unimaginably!" Devyn says."I started crying, and I started shaking."It was around midnight, but the pain was so intense she couldn't stop herself — she cried out so loudly she woke her mother, Sheila. Together, they did ever...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 10, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Managing Children ’s Pain After Surgery - The New York Times
Pain control in infants and children has come a long way over the past few decades. Experts know how to provide appropriate anesthesia when children need surgery and understand the ways that even very young children express distress when they're hurting afterward. There is a lot of evidence about reducing the pain and anxiety that can accompany immunizations and blood draws, and there is increasing expertise about helping children who struggle with chronic pain.But today's parents may be shocked to learn that was not always the case. As recently as the early 1980s, the pain of children and infants was thought to be...
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 1, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Spinal Fractures Can Be Terribly Painful. A Common Treatment Isn ’t Helping. - The New York Times
Scientists warned osteoporosis patients on Thursday to avoid two common procedures used to shore up painful fractures in crumbling spines.The treatments, which involve injecting bone cement into broken vertebrae, relieve pain no better than a placebo does, according to an expert task force convened by the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.The task force noted that the pain goes away or diminishes within six weeks without the procedure. Patients should take painkillers instead, the experts said, and maybe try back braces and physical therapy.More ...https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/24/health/spinal-fracture-trea...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 24, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Repeated pain makes men more sensitive — but not women | CBC Radio
Dr. Loren Martin and his colleagues were actually investigating another question when they discovered this surprising result. They were measuring how multiple sources of pain changed pain perception.In experiments, in mice they used a heat probe that created an mild level of heat on the mouse's feet. Then they gave the mice a dose of vinegar to upset their stomachs. The mice, unsurprisingly, didn't like it.The suprise came when they they repeated the experiment. The male mice showed more stress when brought back to the location of the experiment, and had stronger responses to the heat stimuli - they were more sensi...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 20, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Managing Children ’s Pain After Surgery - The New York Times
Pain control in infants and children has come a long way over the past few decades. Experts know how to provide appropriate anesthesia when children need surgery and understand the ways that even very young children express distress when they're hurting afterward. There is a lot of evidence about reducing the pain and anxiety that can accompany immunizations and blood draws, and there is increasing expertise about helping children who struggle with chronic pain.But today's parents may be shocked to learn that was not always the case. As recently as the early 1980s, the pain of children and infants was thought to be...
Source: Psychology of Pain - January 15, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Heroin Addiction Explained: How Opioids Hijack the Brain - The New York Times
THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC is devastating America. Overdoses have passed car crashes and gun violence to become the leading cause of death for Americans under 55. The epidemic has killed more people than H.I.V. at the peak of that disease, and its death toll exceeds those of the wars in Vietnam and Iraq combined. Funerals for young people have become common. Every 11 minutes, another life is lost.So why do so many people start using these drugs? Why don't they stop?Some people are more susceptible to addiction than others. But nobody is immune. For many, opioids like heroin entice by bestowing an immediate sense of...
Source: Psychology of Pain - December 20, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

This Chemical Is So Hot It Destroys Nerve Fibers —in a Good Way - WIRED
In Morocco there grows a cactus-like plant that's so hot, I have to insist that the next few sentences aren't hyperbole. On the Scoville Scale of hotness, its active ingredient, resiniferatoxin, clocks in at 16 billion units. That's 10,000 times hotter than the Carolina reaper, the world's hottest pepper, and 45,000 times hotter than the hottest of habaneros, and 4.5 million times hotter than a piddling little jalapeno. Euphorbia resinifera, aka the resin spurge, is not to be eaten. Just to be safe, you probably shouldn't even look at it.But while that toxicity will lay up any mammal dumb enough to chew...
Source: Psychology of Pain - November 15, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Pain treatment complicated by doctors' opioid fears - The Washington Post
I felt a shake and opened my eyes. The clock read 1:30 a.m."We need to go to the hospital," my mother whispered in my ear, clutching her stomach.She knew; it was the same pain she had experienced many times before.We were in California, many miles from home, many miles from my father (a doctor), who always knew what to do. At the time, I was early in my medical school training, although I knew all the intricate details of my mother's medical history and realized she needed to get medical attention.When we arrived at the local emergency room in an affluent neighborhood, my mother was placed in a wheelchair and...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 29, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Illusions as Painkillers: the Analgesic Value of Resizing Illusions in Knee Osteoarthritis - Scientific American
Research has shown that the experience of pain is highly subjective: people feel more or less pain, in identical physical situations, as a function of their mood and attention. This flexibility showcases the potential for cognitive manipulations to decrease the pain associated with a variety of pathologies. As an example, the virtual-reality game"Snow World" (in which game in which players shoot snowballs to defeat snowman Frosty and his penguins) reportedly works better than morphine at counteracting the pain of patients in burn units. Other studies have indicated that virtual reality manipulations of the patien...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 21, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Pain Narrative Videos | Pain Education and Advocacy | University of New England
UNE's Center for Excellence in Neurosciences and Interprofessional Education Collaborative have partnered to create this collection of pain narrative videos as part of a group of interprofessional training materials. These materials were crafted to aid future practitioners in providing the highest quality of care to patients experiencing chronic pain. They highlight the importance of working interprofessionally and approaching the patient as a whole person when in treatment. Included are outcomes from a project funded in part by the Maine Cancer Foundation to examine cancer pain from an interprofessional perspective an...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 19, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Too Good to Be True? A Nonaddictive Opioid without Lethal Side Effects Shows Promise - Scientific American
With nearly 50,000 drug overdose deaths from opioids last year and an estimated two million Americans addicted, the opioid crisis continues to rage throughout the U.S. This statistic must be contrasted with another: 25 million Americans live with daily chronic pain, for which few treatment options are available apart from opioid medications.Opioid drugs like morphine and Oxycontin are still held as the gold standard when it comes to relieving pain. But it has become brutally obvious that opioids have dangerous side effects, including physical dependence, addiction and the impaired breathing that too often leads to death fr...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 19, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Body in Mind - Research into the role of the brain and mind in chronic pain - University of South Australia
Here is our vision: To provide a credible and reliable channel through which clinical pain scientists can bring their scientific discoveries straight into the real world. We reckon that the communication bit of science is the bit that often drags the chain of knowledge development and transfer. We want to communicate our science better. We want to side-step, or perhaps leap-frog, the arduous journey that new discoveries make before they have the opportunity to influence the real world. We want people to share in our fascination with the fearful and wonderful complexity of the human; we want people to understand the scienti...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 17, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Most Doctors Are Ill-Equipped to Deal With the Opioid Epidemic. Few Medical Schools Teach Addiction. - The New York Times
To the medical students, the patient was a conundrum.According to his chart, he had residual pain from a leg injury sustained while working on a train track. Now he wanted an opioid stronger than the Percocet he'd been prescribed. So why did his urine test positive for two other drugs — cocaine and hydromorphone, a powerful opioid that doctors had not ordered?It was up to Clark Yin, 29, to figure out what was really going on with Chris McQ, 58 — as seven other third-year medical students and two instructors watched."How are you going to have a conversation around the patient's positive tox screen r...
Source: Psychology of Pain - September 14, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

A New Arizona Law Limits A Doctor's Freedom To Prescribe Painkillers : Shots - Health News : NPR
It started with a rolled ankle during a routine training exercise.Shannon Hubbard never imagined it was the prologue to one of the most debilitating pain conditions known to exist, called­­­­­­­complex regional pain syndrome.It's a condition that causes the nervous system to go haywire, creating pain disproportionate to the actual injury. It can also affect how the body regulates temperature and blood flow.For Hubbard, it manifested several years ago following surgery on her foot. That's a common way for it to take hold."My leg feels like it's on fire pretty much all the time. I...
Source: Psychology of Pain - July 9, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

The Neuroscience of Pain | The New Yorker
On a foggy February morning in Oxford, England, I arrived at the John Radcliffe Hospital, a shiplike nineteen-seventies complex moored on a hill east of the city center, for the express purpose of being hurt. I had an appointment with a scientist named Irene Tracey, a brisk woman in her early fifties who directs Oxford University's Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences and has become known as the Queen of Pain."We might have a problem with you being a ginger," she warned when we met. Redheads typically perceive pain differently from those with other hair colors; many also flinch at the use of the G-wo...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 25, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

HEAL Initiative | National Institutes of Health (NIH)
In April 2018, NIH launched the HEAL (Helping to End Addiction Long-term) Initiative, an aggressive, trans-agency effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis. This Initiative will build on extensive, well-established NIH research, including basic science of the complex neurological pathways involved in pain and addiction, implementation science to develop and test treatment models, and research to integrate behavioral interventions with Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). Successes from this research include the development of the nasal form of naloxo...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 12, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

How health insurers are making America ’s opioid epidemic worse - Vox
Mandy has now been in recovery from her opioid addiction for more than two months — and she's ready to keep that going. But the 29-year-old in the Chicago area is now dealing with a big obstacle: her health insurer.Mandy, who asked I use only her first name, said she struggled with addiction for six years. It started with back pain, which a doctor tried to treat with Vicodin. " I had tried [opioids] in high school, " she said. " I had an older boyfriend, and I tried some of his wisdom teeth painkillers to get high off of. And I was like,'Whoa, this is awesome.'When I got a Vicodin prescription for...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 5, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

BBC - Future - Pain bias: The health inequality rarely discussed
In 2009, my doctor told me that, like"a lot of women", I was paying too much attention to my body. Saying there wasn't an issue, he suggested I just relax and try to ignore the symptoms.The decision seemed to run counter to what my records showed. A few weeks earlier, I had ended up in the emergency room with chest pains and a heart rate hitting 220 beats per minute. The ER crew told me it was a panic attack, gave me Xanax and told me to try to sleep.I'd had panic attacks before. I knew this episode was not one. So I went to my doctor.He put me on a heart monitor overnight. Bingo: I had another episode, t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 31, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

NIH Pain Consortium
The NIH Pain Consortium was established to enhance pain research and promote collaboration among researchers across the many NIH Institutes and Centers that have programs and activities addressing pain. To this end, the following goals have been identified for the Pain Consortium:• To develop a comprehensive and forward-thinking pain research agenda for the NIH - one that builds on what we have learned from our past efforts.• To identify key opportunities in pain research, particularly those that provide for multidisciplinary and trans-NIH participation.• To increase visibility for pain research - both withi...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 31, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Chronic pain treatment: Psychotherapy, not opioids, has been proven to work - Vox
When pain settled into Blair Golson's hands, it didn't let go.What started off as light throbbing in one wrist 10 years ago quickly engulfed the other. The discomfort then spread, producing a pain much"like slapping your hands against a concrete wall," he says. He was constantly stretching them, constantly shaking them, while looking for hot or cold surfaces to lay them on for relief.But worse was the deep sense of catastrophe that accompanied the pain. Working in tech-related startups, he depended on his hands to type."Every time the pain got bad, I would think some variation of,'Oh no, I'm ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 20, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

New Drug Offers Hope to Millions With Severe Migraines - The New York Times
The first medicine designed to prevent migraines was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Thursday, ushering in what many experts believe will be a new era in treatment for people who suffer the most severe form of these headaches.The drug, Aimovig, made by Amgen and Novartis, is a monthly injection with a device similar to an insulin pen. The list price will be $6,900 a year, and Amgen said the drug will be available to patients within a week.Aimovig blocks a protein fragment, CGRP, that instigates and perpetuates migraines. Three other companies — Lilly, Teva and Alder — have similar medicines in t...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 18, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Treatments Prescribed For Lower Back Pain Are Often Ineffective, Report Says : NPR
Chances are, you — or someone you know — has suffered from lower back pain.It can be debilitating. It's a leading cause of disability globally.And the number of people with the often-chronic condition is likely to increase.This warning comes via a series of articles published in the medical journal Lancet in March. They state that about 540 million people have lower back pain — and they predict that the number will jump as the world's population ages and as populations in lower- and middle-income countries move to urban centers and adopt more sedentary lives."We don't think about [back pa...
Source: Psychology of Pain - May 10, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Lack Of Research On Medical Marijuana Leaves Patients In The Dark : Shots - Health News : NPR
By the time Ann Marie Owen, 61, turned to marijuana to treat her pain, she was struggling to walk and talk. She was also hallucinating.For four years, her doctor prescribed a wide range of opioids for transverse myelitis, a debilitating disease that caused pain, muscle weakness and paralysis.The drugs not only failed to ease her symptoms, they hooked her.When her home state of New York legalized marijuana for the treatment of select medical ailments, Owens decided it was time to swap pills for pot. But her doctors refused to help."Even though medical marijuana is legal, none of my doctors were willing to talk to me ab...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 10, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Naloxone Stops Opioid Overdoses. How Do You Use It? - The New York Times
The United States surgeon general issued a rare national advisory on Thursday urging more Americans to carry naloxone, a drug used to revive people overdosing on opioids.The last time a surgeon general issued such an urgent warning to the country was in 2005, when Richard H. Carmona advised women not to drink alcohol when pregnant.More ...https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/06/us/naloxone-narcan-opioid-overdose.html (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 7, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Medicare Is Cracking Down on Opioids. Doctors Fear Pain Patients Will Suffer. - The New York Times
Medicare officials thought they had finally figured out how to do their part to fix the troubling problem of opioids being overprescribed to the old and disabled: In 2016, a staggering one in three of 43.6 million beneficiaries of the federal health insurance program had been prescribed the painkillers.Medicare, they decided, would now refuse to pay for long-term, high-dose prescriptions; a rule to that effect is expected to be approved on April 2. Some medical experts have praised the regulation as a check on addiction.But the proposal has also drawn a broad and clamorous blowback from many people who ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 28, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

America's War on Pain Pills Is Killing Addicts and Leaving Patients in Agony - Reason.com
Craig, a middle-aged banking consultant who was on his school's lacrosse team in college and played professionally for half a dozen years after graduating, began developing back problems in his early 30s. " Degenerative disc disease runs in my family, and the constant pounding on AstroTurf probably did not help, " he says. One day, he recalls, " I was lifting a railroad tie out of the ground with a pick ax, straddled it, and felt the pop. That was my first herniation. "After struggling with herniated discs and neuropathy, Craig consulted with " about 10 different surgeons " and decided to have...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 24, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

What's in a Name for Chronic Pain? | Pain Research Forum
For decades, pain researchers have set their sights on understanding pain mechanisms —the cellular and molecular machinery underlying chronic pain. In doing so, they became increasingly aware that the terms they used to describe the neurobiological workings of pain did not always match what they had learned.But now, official adoption by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) of an IASP terminology task force recommendation for a so-called"third mechanistic descriptor" of chronic pain could move the field forward in its efforts to more fully characterize the known pathophysiological mecha...
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 23, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Handing out naloxone doesn ’t fix opioid crisis | Dalla Lana School of Public Health
In the midst of a national opioid crisis, take-home naloxone programs have expanded rapidly. Ontario's Minister of Health and Long Term Care Dr. Eric Hoskins recently announced that naloxone kits will be provided to fire and police departments across the province, but U of T researchers are questioning whether naloxone distribution might distance people from health-care services or worsen health inequities.More ...http://www.dlsph.utoronto.ca/2018/02/handing-out-naloxone-doesnt-fix-opioid-crisis/? (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - March 13, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

“Brave Men” and “Emotional Women”: A Theory-Guided Literature Review on Gender Bias in Health Care and Gendered Norms towards Patients with Chronic Pain - Pain Research and Management
Conclusions. Awareness about gendered norms is important, both in research and clinical practice, in order to counteract gender bias in health care and to support health-care professionals in providing more equitable care that is more capable to meet the need of all patients, men and women.https://www.hindawi.com/journals/prm/2018/6358624/ (Source: Psychology of Pain)
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 26, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Migraine Relief May Be On The Way With New Therapies In Development : Shots - Health News : NPR
Humans have suffered from migraines for millennia. Yet, despite decades of research, there isn't a drug on the market today that prevents them by targeting the underlying cause. All of that could change in a few months when the FDA is expected to announce its decision about new therapies that have the potential to turn migraine treatment on its head.The new therapies are based on research begun in the 1980s showing that people in the throes of a migraine attack have high levels of a protein called calcitonin gene –related peptide (CGRP) in their blood.Step by step, researchers tracked and studied this neurochemic...
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 9, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

PAS-18-624: Mechanistic investigations of psychosocial stress effects on opioid use patterns (R01- Clinical Trial Optional)
Psychosocial stress, defined here as socioenvironmental demands that tax the adaptive capacity of the individual (e.g., low socioeconomic status, childhood adversity, bullying), has repeatedly been linked to substance use disorders (SUDs). Neighborhood poverty and social support are shown to influence substance use patterns. Among smokers, multiple psychosocial stressors are associated with relapse, and acute psychosocial stress has been demonstrated to enhance cigarette craving and smoking behavior. Similarly, psychosocial stress has been associated with greater risk of relapse in individuals with alcohol and cocaine use ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - February 5, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs