When Your Doctor Prescribes A Vibrator For Your Aging Vagina

Doctors have been adding a new tool to the arsenal of how they restore the sex lives of menopausal and post-menopausal women: the humble vibrator. With the onset of menopause, a decrease in the production of hormones causes vaginal tissue to get thinner and drier. Vaginal muscles can also atrophy, leading to painful sex ― a problem for half of all menopausal and post-menopausal women, according to the National Institutes of Health. But the solution might be as simple as a vibrating piece of silicon.  Vibrators that are used internally stimulate pelvic blood flow, which increases vaginal moisture and boosts sexual response, all of which makes sex (with or without a partner) better. Like any muscle, the vagina is best kept healthy with regular exercise — it’s the “use it or lose it” thing. Deterioration of this muscle becomes more common as middle-age or older women find themselves in situations where they aren’t sexually active anymore ― single, divorced, widowed or just not having regular sex with partners. Therapeutically speaking, frequent vibrator use can prevent and ward off conditions such as painful vaginal dryness and atrophy. And yes, doctors are recommending their use ― with the caveat that since the vibrator industry isn’t regulated, certain cautionary steps should be taken. (In brief: Keep anything you put inside your privates clean, and don’t share your toys with friends.) Dr. Barb ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
This article reports a retrospective case series of five patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with prolonged vaso-occlusive episodes (VOEs). Patients were treated with a continuous-infusion of low-dose ketamine (up to 5 µg/kg/min) after insufficient pain control with opioid analgesic therapy. Outcomes studied included impact on opioid analgesic use, a description of ketamine dosing strategy, and an analysis of adverse events due to opioid or ketamine analgesia. Descriptive statistics are provided. During ketamine infusion, patients experienced a lower reported pain score (mean numeric rating scale ...
Source: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy - Category: Palliative Care Tags: J Pain Palliat Care Pharmacother Source Type: research
Unrelieved pain caused by invasive procedures in early life is associated with detrimental outcomes in all major organ systems and has lasting implications for impairment of biobehavioural and neurodevelopment outcomes in neonatal period and later life.1 2 However, 40% –90% of infants still do not receive effective pain-relieving interventions.3 4 Non-pharmacological interventions, especially those incorporating …
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
ARTHRITIS pain affects about 10 million people in the UK, and symptoms include joint pain and inflammation. Cutting back on this food ingredient in your diet could lower your risk of arthritis signs.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center ’s annual Premier Chefs Dinner at Sodo Park on May 20 brought in a record $1.47 million.
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - Category: Health Management Authors: Source Type: news
When can patients safely drive after surgery? It is neither scientific nor prudent to rely on patients' judgment. A goal is to develop objective data to support evidence-based decision making and lower the rate of postoperative complications, including motor vehicle accidents. In addition, it is obvious and evidence-based that patients should not drive while wearing an arm sling, and while the evidence is mixed, we advise that patients should not return to driving while taking opioid pain medications.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: In this group of GPs, participation rates were high for most of the therapeutic and communicative tasks suggested in the questionnaire. GP participation is feasible not only in palliative care, but also in some aspects of oncological treatment and in clinical follow-up. Communication with both patient and hospital seemed good in this local setting. GPs are important helpers for some cancer patients. PMID: 29788744 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Rural and Remote Health - Category: Rural Health Tags: Rural Remote Health Source Type: research
Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors During "Re-Entry" Following Cancer Treatment
Source: CDC Preventing Chronic Disease - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Public Health Source Type: news
HIGH blood pressure symptoms include headaches, chest pain and difficulty breathing. You can compare your hypertension risk with a normal blood pressure for your age. Are you at risk of the deadly condition?
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
Source: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition - Category: Nutrition Authors: Source Type: research
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