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There Is Now An App For Sperm Testing

A new device that attaches to a smartphone can detect whether a man’s sperm concentration or motility is abnormal with 98 percent accuracy. Researchers hope the device, which is about the size of a small box of crayons and costs less than $5 to make, can address the need for a rapid and cheap way to detect male infertility. Problems with sperm contribute to infertility in 40 percent to 60 percent of cases where a couple has trouble conceiving, said study leader Hadi Shafiee, a professor of engineering in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. Current laboratory methods of semen analysis are either inaccurate or expensive and require men to provide a sperm sample in awkward circumstances. [Trying to Conceive: 12 Tips for Men] “This device is going to make male infertility screening as simple as home pregnancy tests for a woman,” Shafiee told Live Science. Smartphone semen analysis The device has two parts: a box-like piece that attaches to the phone as if it were a larger-than-normal phone case, and a chip, which is about the size of a microscope slide. To test his sperm, a man uses a pipette (a turkey baster-like tube, but smaller) to put a semen sample onto a chip, and then he inserts the chip into a slot on the box-like attachment. Lenses on the attachment essentially turn the smartphone’s camera into a microscope, and a software app automatically counts the total number of sperm, calculates their concent...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

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Authors: Palomba S, Falbo A, Daolio J, Battaglia FA, LA Sala GB Abstract Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common female disorder with a pathogenesis still today not completely known. To the present, PCOS is considered more than just a reproductive disorder since several metabolic consequences that could affect women's health during different stages of reproductive and post-reproductive life were reported. The aim of the current review was to evaluate present evidence-based data regarding the pregnancy complications in infertile patients with PCOS. An extensive literature search until February 2018 was performe...
Source: Minerva Ginecologica - Category: OBGYN Tags: Minerva Ginecol Source Type: research
ConclusionsThe outcomes of IVF after neosalpingostomy were matchable with salpingectomy. For patients desire to preserve fallopian tubes, we recommend laparoscopic neosalpingostomy as an alternative choice to manage moderate hydrosalpinx before IVF.
Source: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
ConclusionThe present review revealed a high prevalence of BV in non-pregnant women. Given that BV is associated with a series of reproductive complications such as infertility, taking preventive measures such as awareness of patients as well as monitoring and controlling of syndrome are essential.
Source: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
Perspectives in Psychiatric Care, EarlyView.
Source: Perspectives In Psychiatric Care - Category: Psychiatry Authors: Source Type: research
Conclusion Careful consideration of primary ectopic pregnancy data is a valuable tool to predict the potential risk of recurrence in the future.
Source: European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Biology - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeRatio of fetal weight to placenta size varies by mode of conception (fertility treatments utilized) in animals. Our objective was to assess whether fertility treatments also affect these ratios in humans.MethodsIn this retrospective study, we assessed two cohorts: (a) early gestation cohort, women with singleton pregnancies who underwent first trimester vaginal ultrasound and (b) delivered cohort, women who delivered a live-born, singleton infant with placenta disposition to pathology. Crown rump length (CRL) and estimated placental volume (EPV) were calculated from first trimester ultrasound images using a ...
Source: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics - Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: research
Publication date: June 2018 Source:Reproductive Toxicology, Volume 78 Author(s): P.A. Stapleton, C.R. McBride, J. Yi, A.B. Abukabda, T.R. Nurkiewicz Preconceptive health encompasses male and female reproductive capability. In females, this takes into account each of the stages of the estrous cycle. Microvascular reactivity varies throughout the estrous cycle in response to hormonal changes and in preparation for pregnancy. Microvascular alterations in response to engineered nanomaterial (ENM) exposure have been described within 24-h of inhalation; however, the impact upon the uterine vasculature at differing estrous stage...
Source: Reproductive Toxicology - Category: Toxicology Source Type: research
To compare sperm parameters, serum hormone levels, pregnancy and miscarriage rates between the infertile men with recurrent or persistent varicocele who underwent microsurgical subinguinal redo varicocelectomy or had observation only.
Source: Urology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Infertility Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Our results show that Epstein-Barr infection is possibly associated with autoimmune ovarian failure. The devastating impact on fertility in such disorder can be successfully avoided by in vitro maturation of oocytes from excised ovarian tissue. PMID: 29618356 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Reproductive Biology - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reprod Biol Endocrinol Source Type: research
We examined relationships between maternal age (modeled flexibly to allow curvilinear shapes) and pregnancy outcomes using logistic regression. We plotted absolute predicted risks to display curves from age 20 to 50 estimated for two risk profiles: (1) population average values of all risk factors; (2) a low-risk profile without preexisting diabetes/hypertension, smoking, prior spontaneous/therapeutic abortion, diagnosed infertility, inadequate prenatal care, low income, rural residence, or obesity. Results: Risks of hypertensive disorders increased gradually until age 35, then accelerated. Risk of multiple gestations, ...
Source: Epidemiology - Category: Epidemiology Tags: Reproductive and Perinatal Source Type: research
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