Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Plague likely a Stone Age arrival to central Europe
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) A team of researchers led by scientists at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has sequenced the first six European genomes of the plague-causing bacterium Yersinia pestis dating from the Late Neolithic to the Bronze Age (4,800 to 3,700 years ago). Analysis of these samples, published in Current Biology, suggests that the Stone Age Plague entered Europe during the Neolithic with a large-scale migration of people from the Eurasian steppe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Introduction to Human Plague: Managing Infectious Hazards
World Health Organization. 2017 This 21-minute module is an introductory-level online course on plague, a zoonotic disease with severe clinical presentations caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. It describes the transmission cycle of the disease, explains the difference between the bubonic plague and pneumonic plague, and describes the public health concerns of plague. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Plague Fact Sheet
World Health Organization. 04/2017 This fact sheet provides information about plague, an infectious disease caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, a zoonotic bacteria, usually found in small mammals and their fleas. It is transmitted between animals from their fleas. The fact sheet discusses signs and symptoms, where plague is found, diagnosing plague, treatment, prevention, vaccination, managing plague outbreaks, and surveillance and control. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

What Is a Yersinia Arthritic Infection?
Title: What Is a Yersinia Arthritic Infection?Category: Doctor's& Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 8/29/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 8/29/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Arthritis General)
Source: MedicineNet Arthritis General - August 29, 2017 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

There ’ s plague in Arizona. Authorities warn of fleas that can infect people and pets.
Public health officials in two Arizona counties are warning residents about the discovery of plague bacteria, an endemic concern among those who live in the American Southwest but unsettling nonetheless, given the disease's devastating impact on human history. Navajo and Coconino counties are adjacent to one another, and in each community the findings are identical: Fleas carrying yersinia […]Related:5 dead after FDA-approved obesity treatment that places silicone balloon in stomach, agency saysA sleeping mother suffocated her newborn in the maternity ward. Now she’s suing the hospital.Trump dec...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Conditions is Erythema Nodosum Associated With?
Patient Presentation A 12-year-old male came to clinic with a history of 3-4 days of painful bruising on his shin and lower arms. He had Streptocococcal pharyngitis diagnosed by rapid strep testing approximately 4 weeks previously and had taken all of his amoxicillin antibiotic per his parents. He had recovered without any problems until 3-4 days ago when his legs and arms started to have painful bruises along the shins and lower arms. They were raised, red/purple and painful mainly in the center of the lesions. He denied pain elsewhere nor any fever (Tmax was 99.5F), chills, sweats, weight loss, joint stiffness, abdomina...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 24, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Plague bacteria take refuge in amoebae
Yersinia pestis, the bacterium that causes bubonic plague, can survive within the ubiquitous soil protozoan, the amoeba, by producing proteins that protect against the latter microbe's digestion, report scientists. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 29, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

A vaccine against the plague? This Maryland company is on it
A subsidiary of Falls Church-based government IT firm CSRA Inc. (NYSE: CSRA) has received a nod from the Food and Drug Administration for the vaccine it is developing against the bubonic plague. Yes, the plague. Frederick-based DynPort Vaccine Company LLC was granted Orphan Drug Designation from the FDA for the vaccine it is creating for the U.S. Department of Defense. It is intended for pre-exposure prophylaxis to combat the infection from Yersinia pestis, which is the causative agent o f the bubonic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Tina Reed Source Type: news

Frozen chemistry controls bacterial infections
Chemists and molecular biologists have made an unexpected discovery in infection biology. The researchers can now show that two proteins that bind to one another slow down a chemical reaction central to the course of the disease in the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 3, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Frozen chemistry controls bacterial infections
(Umea University) Chemists and molecular biologists have made an unexpected discovery in infection biology. The researchers can now show that two proteins that bind to one another slow down a chemical reaction central to the course of the disease in the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. The results have been published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 3, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Interim-Planning Guidance for the Handling of Solid Waste Contaminated with a Category A Infectious Substance
U.S. Department of Transportation. 01/19/2017 This 82-page document provides federal guidance for the safe handling of solid waste contaminated with a Category A infectious substance and the proper management of inactivated Category A waste materials in the United States. An infectious substance meets Category A criteria if it is in a form capable of causing permanent disability or life-threatening or fatal disease in otherwise healthy humans or animals upon exposure to the substance (such as Ebola virus, Yersinia pestis, or Bacillus anthracis). (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 23, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Race to make vaccine for the PLAGUE amid fears terrorists could use it to kill millions
Researchers at the University of Texas, backed by the Department of Defense, warn Yersinia pestis is one of the most likely candidates for a bioweapon. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Race to make vaccine for the PLAGUE amid fears terrorists could be turning it into a weapon to wipe out millions
Researchers at the University of Texas, backed by the Department of Defense, warn Yersinia pestis is one of the most likely candidates for a bioweapon. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Reconstructing the 6th century plague from a victim
(Molecular Biology and Evolution (Oxford University Press)) Scientists based in Germany, including Michal Feldman, Johannes Krause, Michaela Harbeck and colleagues have confirmed the bacterial culprit of the plague from sixth century skeletons found in Altenerding, an ancient southern German burial site near Munich. The Altenerding genome dates back to the very beginning of the plague. They have generated the first high-coverage genome of the bacterial agent responsible for the Justinian plague, in addition to revealing new insights in the molecular evolution of Yersinia pestis since the Byzantine era. (Source: EurekAlert!...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 30, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bacteria can multiply disease-inducing genes to rapidly cause infection
More than 22 years ago, researchers discovered an infection strategy of human pathogenic Yersinia bacteria -- a protein structure in bacterial cell-walls that resembled a syringe. The structure, named "Type III secretion system" or T3SS, makes it possible to transfer bacterial proteins into the host cell and destroy its metabolism. After the discovery, researchers have found T3SS in several other bacteria species and T3SS has proven to be a common infection mechanism that pathogens, i.e. an infectious agent such as a virus or bacterium, use to destroy host cells. Now researchers have found a link between infectio...
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

[In Depth] How Europe exported the Black Death
Black Death—the bubonic plague—probably reached Europe from Asia in 1346, and later outbreaks were thought to have arrived from the east via a similar route. Now, scientists have evidence that a virulent strain of the Black Death bacterium lurked for centuries in Europe while also working its way back to Asia. At the recent Society for American Archaeology meeting, researchers reported analyzing the remains of medieval victims in London; Barcelona, Spain; and near the Volga River in Russia. They determined that the victims all died of a highly similar strain of Yersinia pestis, the plague bacterium, which had m...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 28, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Lawler Tags: Ancient DNA Source Type: news

Two distinct subspecies of plague associated with differences in geographical elevation
(PLOS) Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in America have carried out a genetic study of plague caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis in Uganda. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 11, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Good Side of Viruses
While we have extensively studied the role of bacteria that call our bodies' home, we have yet to achieve that level of understanding with viruses. In fact, the study of the populations of viruses that exist in the human body, the virome, is in its infancy. We generally consider viruses an enemy that can cause diseases from the common cold to Ebola. New viruses are discovered regularly and scientists are beginning to appreciate the diversity of viruses and their roles in nature. Some don't infect people at all, while others are actually beneficial members of the human microbiome. The microbiome is the collection of microb...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Determination of the Persistence of Non-Spore-Forming Biological Threat Agents in the Environment
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Homeland Security Research Center. 12/07/2015This 35-page report presents the results of an investigation to evaluate the persistence (or natural attenuation) of Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis), Francisella tularensis (F. tularensis), and Burkholderia mallei (B. mallei) on glass and soil under multiple environmental conditions and time points. This generation of scientifically defensible persistence data is useful for the proper planning of decontamination efficacy tests and for formulation of response or remediation plans in preparation for pos...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - January 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

The plague's deadly pedigree goes back 3,000 years earlier than thought
Turns out the plague was, er, plaguing humans far earlier than once thought. A study of ancient DNA pulled from human teeth in Asia and Europe finds that the bacteria Yersinia pestis had infected humans as far back as 2,800 to 5,000 years ago – perhaps three millenniums earlier than expected. The... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - October 23, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Amina Khan Source Type: news

Matter: In Ancient DNA, Evidence of Plague Much Earlier Than Previously Known
A new study suggests that Yersinia pestis, which causes plague, infected people as long as 5,000 years ago. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 22, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CARL ZIMMER Tags: Genetics and Heredity DNA (Deoxyribonucleic Acid) Russia Willerslev, Eske Siberia Plague Poland Europe Bubonic Plague Current Biology (Journal) Source Type: news

Plague infected humans much earlier than previously thought
(Cell Press) Plague infections were common in humans 3,300 years earlier than the historical record suggests, reports a study published in Cell. By sequencing the DNA of tooth samples from Bronze Age individuals, the researchers discovered evidence of plague infections roughly 4,800 years ago. But it was at least another thousand years until the bacterium, Yersinia pestis, acquired key changes in virulence genes, allowing it to spread via fleas and evade the host immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: One small bacterial change 'caused Black Death'
How did Yersinia pestis bacteria transform from a simple GI infection to causing history-changing respiratory plague pandemics? A new study says it took just one gene. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 1, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Minor changes turned Black Death germ from mild to murderous
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The bacterium Yersinia pestis has inflicted almost unimaginable misery upon humankind over the centuries, killing an estimated 200 million or more people and triggering horrific plagues in the 6th and 14th centuries. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 30, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

How small genetic change in Yersinia pestis changed human history
While studying Yersinia pestis, the bacteria responsible for epidemics of plague such as the Black Death, scientists found a single small genetic change that fundamentally influenced the evolution of the deadly pathogen, and thus the course of human history. They demonstrated how the acquisition of a single gene caused the shift of Y. pestis from causing a primarily gastrointestinal infection to a more serious and often fatal respiratory disease and how later modifications lead to infections associated with the bubonic plague. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

How small genetic change in Yersinia pestis changed human history
(Northwestern University) While studying Yersinia pestis, the bacteria responsible for epidemics of plague such as the Black Death, scientists found a single small genetic change that fundamentally influenced the evolution of the deadly pathogen, and thus the course of human history. They demonstrated how the acquisition of a single gene caused the shift of Y. pestis from causing a primarily gastrointestinal infection to a more serious and often fatal respiratory disease and how later modifications lead to infections associated with the bubonic plague. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 30, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Forms of the Plague: Transmission, Symptoms & Prevention
The bacteria that causes plague, 'Yersinia pestis,' continues to exist in a cycle involving rodents and the fleas they carry. In urban areas or places with thick rat infestations, the plague bacteria may cycle between rodents and their fleas. The last urban outbreak of rat-associated plague in America happened in the city of Los Angeles between the year of 1924-1925. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - June 24, 2015 Category: Disability Tags: Health and Disability Source Type: news

CDC Report Shows Vibrio, A Deadly Type Of Food Poisoning, Is On The Rise
The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention issued a new report on food safety this week that had a little good news, and quite a bit of bad news, for American consumers. The report, which is based on data collected by the CDC's FoodNet program, compared food poisoning rates in two three-year periods, 2006-2008 and 2011-2013. It showed that infections caused by the dangerous O157 strain of E. coli, which caused the notorious Jack in the Box food poisoning outbreak of 1993, declined by 32 percent between those two periods. Sicknesses associated with Yersinia and Salmonella serotype Typhimurium also dipped over that sam...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC Report Shows Vibrio, A Deadly Type Of Food Poisoning, Is On The Rise
The Centers For Disease Control and Prevention issued a new report on food safety this week that had a little good news, and quite a bit of bad news, for American consumers. The report, which is based on data collected by the CDC's FoodNet program, compared food poisoning rates in two three-year periods, 2006-2008 and 2011-2013. It showed that infections caused by the dangerous O157 strain of E. coli, which caused the notorious Jack in the Box food poisoning outbreak of 1993, declined by 32 percent between those two periods. Sicknesses associated with Yersinia and Salmonella serotype Typhimurium also dipped over that sam...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 16, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Colorado Plague Outbreak Traced Back To Pet Dog
Researchers have traced a 2014 outbreak of plague in Colorado back to a pit bull, according to a new report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A Colorado man identified only as “Patient A” fell ill in late June and was incorrectly diagnosed with pneumonia, according to Friday's report. More than a week later, doctors determined his fever, coughing and bloody mucus were caused by the bacteria Yersinia Pestis, which causes plague. Doctors diagnosed the man with pneumonic plague, meaning the infection was in his lungs. It took 23 days in the hospital for him to recover, according to the re...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - May 1, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bubonic bottleneck: Scientists overturn dogma on the plague
Researchers discover that the accepted theory of how Yersinia pestis microbes travel from fleabite to lymph node is off base. Most bacteria get trapped in a bottleneck and never make it to the lymph node, where infection takes root. Finding out why could lead to new ways to stop the pathogen. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 12, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Bubonic bottleneck: UNC scientists overturn dogma on the plague
(University of North Carolina Health Care) Researchers discover that the accepted theory of how Yersinia pestis microbes travel from fleabite to lymph node is off base. Most bacteria get trapped in a bottleneck and never make it to the lymph node, where infection takes root. Finding out why could lead to new ways to stop the pathogen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

: Revisitation of an Enduring Human Pathogen
Yersinia enterocolitica remains a charismatic microorganism. The research findings outlined in this article have uncovered new virulence factors, such as type III secretion systems, and have advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal infections caused by Y. enterocolitica. Furthermore, a clarification of the potential capability of biovar 1A strains, long regarded as avirulent, has now proven that they cause symptomatic infections in appropriate patient settings, such as immunosuppression or hemochromatosis. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - December 23, 2014 Category: Microbiology Authors: Edward J. Bottone Source Type: news

Researchers discover exactly how the bubonic plague spread so effectively - and say it could improve our handling of Ebola
Duke researchers have discovered exactly how the Yersinia pestis bacteria that causes bubonic plague spreads through the body. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 22, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Immune cells outsmart bacterial infection by dying, study shows
A clearer picture of the delicate arms race between the human immune system and a pathogen that seeks to infect and kill human cells has been painted through new research. The research explores the strategies by which the bacterial pathogen Yersinia, responsible for causing plague and gastrointestinal infections, tries to outsmart immune cell responses and looks at the tactics used by the immune system to fight back. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 5, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

A plague in your family
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) The first view of the Black Death bacterium's entire family tree shows some how family members evolve to become harmful. The researchers showed that Yersinia pestis and Yersinia enterocolitica, two major disease-causing species, independently acquired DNA that allowed them to become pathogenic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 21, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New strains of the Black Death could emerge
Conclusion This study improves the understanding of the family tree of the plague-causing bacteria Yersinia pestis. It indicated the first plague pandemic was caused by a strain of Y. pestis distinct from the histories of all modern strains of the bacteria, and of the bacteria that caused two subsequent plague pandemics. This type of genetic evidence is persuasive so the conclusions are likely to be reliable. There are two main interpretations of the results. First, the bacteria that caused the Plague of Justinian came into existence then died out. Second, the bacteria strain that caused the Plague of Justinian remains in ...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 28, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Genetics/stem cells Medical practice Source Type: news

Yersinia enterocolitica: a Rare Cause of Infective Endocarditis and Mycotic Aneurysm
Yersinia enterocolitica is a facultative, anaerobic, gram-negative coccobacillus taxonomically assigned within the family Enterobacteriaceae. The genus Yersinia consists of 11 different species; however, only 3 of these species are pathogenic for humans—Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, and two enteropathogenic species, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia enterocolitica. Y. enterocolitica is a food-borne pathogen typically associated with diarrhea, terminal ileitis, and mesenteric lymphadenitis. It is occasionally associated with invasive and metastatic diseases, as well (). When cultivated in the ...
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 14, 2014 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jenifer C. Mason, Pankaj Lal, Francesco Torella, Asheesh Sharma, Richard Cooke, Jim Anson Source Type: news

Bacterial toxin sets the course for serious infection
Braunschweig have now discovered what makes a specific strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis - one of the main instigators for these infections - so dangerous: the bacteria produce a molecule called CNFy that facilitates the infection process for them. It changes the host cells in a manner that enables the injection apparatus of Yersinia, which injects toxins into the cells, to work more efficiently. This strengthens the infection and leads to inflammation of the tissue. Whether an immune cell divides, alarms other immune cells or dies is strictly controlled in our immune system... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 11, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Bacterial toxin sets the course for infection
(Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research) Braunschweig have now discovered what makes a specific strain of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis -- one of the main instigators for these infections -- so dangerous: the bacteria produce a molecule called CNFy that facilitates the infection process for them. It changes the host cells in a manner that enables the injection apparatus of Yersinia, which injects toxins into the cells, to work more efficiently. This strengthens the infection and leads to inflammation of the tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 7, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Detection of anthrax and other pathogens using a unique liquid array technology - Schweighardt AJ, Battaglia A, Wallace MM.
A bead-based liquid hybridization assay, Luminex(®) 100™, was used to identify four pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, and several close relatives. Hybridization... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - October 28, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

How Yersinia spreads within infected organs
Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine and the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts have identified how one type of bacteria, Yersinia, immobilizes the immune system in order to grow in the organs of mice. To do so, the researchers extended the use of a technique and suggest that it could be used to study other bacteria that use the same or similar means of infection. The study is published in Cell Host & Microbe. Led by microbiologist Joan Mecsas, the research team studied a specific member of a family of effector proteins known as Yops... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 19, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

Tufts researchers identify how Yersinia spreads within infected organs
(Tufts University, Health Sciences Campus) Researchers at Tufts have identified how one type of bacteria, Yersinia, immobilizes the immune system in order to grow in the organ tissues of mice. To do so, the researchers extended the use of a technique and suggest that it could be used to study other bacteria that use the same or similar means of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 16, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scientists solve structure of infection tool used by Yersinia bacterium
Abdominal pain, fever, diarrhoea - these symptoms could point to an infection with the bacterium Yersinia. The bacterium's pathogenic potential is based on a syringe-like injection apparatus called injectisome. For the first time, an international team of researchers including scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, Germany, has unraveled this molecular syringe's spatial conformation... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 3, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

3-D molecular syringes
(Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research) Abdominal pain, fever, diarrhea -- these symptoms could point to an infection with the bacterium Yersinia. Its pathogenic potential is based on a syringe-like injection apparatus called injectisome. An international team of researchers including scientists at the HZI in Braunschweig, Germany, has now unraveled this molecular syringe's spatial conformation. The researchers demonstrated that the length of Yersinia's injectisome's basal body, which crosses the bacterial cell wall, is adjustable -- very likely an adaptation to physical stress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Easy and accurate identification of the Black Death
Diagnosing the presence of Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague, may soon be easier than ever before. Scientists working with Peter Seeberger, Director at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces (MPIKG) in Potsdam and Professor at the Freie Universitat Berlin, have come up with a simple, inexpensive and reliable method of detecting the bacterium. The research team, specialising in glycochemistry glycobiology, first identified and synthesised an oligosaccharide structure on bacterial surface before combining it with a protein to heighten the immunological effect... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 27, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases / Bacteria / Viruses Source Type: news

A quick test for the Black Death
(Max-Planck-Gesellschaft) A sugar-based detection method enables easy and accurate identification of the Yersinia pestis bacterium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Scientists confirm that the Justinianic Plague was caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) The results of ancient DNA analyses carried out on the early medieval cemetery of Aschheim in Bavaria, Germany, confirmed unambiguously that Y. pestis was the causing agent of the first pandemic, the so-called Justinianic Plague. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Rates Of Foodborne Illness Cases On The Rise
Rates of food borne illnesses - also known as "food poisoning" are on the rise, according to a new report released today by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The report compared rates of food borne infections from 2012 to rates from the period spanning 2006-2008 and found that the prevalence of infections from bacteria called Campylobacter and Vibrio increased. Additionally, they found that rates of infections from Cryptosporidium,�Listeria,�Salmonella,�Shigella, Shiga toxin-producing�Escherichia coli�(STEC) O157, and�Yersinia�rema...
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 18, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Environmental factors may explain plague re-emergence in northern Africa
Two recent outbreaks of plague in Libya and Algeria are likely due to re-emergence or re-activation of ancient Yersinia pestis from the local area, rather than recent importation from the same distant source, suggest study findings. (Source: MedWire News - Infectious Diseases)
Source: MedWire News - Infectious Diseases - January 17, 2013 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news