Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Paclitaxel and MG1 Oncolytic Virus for Breast Cancer Paclitaxel and MG1 Oncolytic Virus for Breast Cancer
Are paclitaxel and oncolytic virotherapy synergistic and compatible for breast cancer?Breast Cancer Research (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Using Viruses to Boost Mesothelioma Immunotherapy
Immunotherapy through clinical trials is becoming a promising treatment option for some mesothelioma patients. Checkpoint inhibitor drugs, such as Keytruda, already have U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval as first-line treatments for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), edging immunotherapy drugs closer to becoming a viable second-line therapy for other thoracic cancers, including pleural mesothelioma. However, overall response to immune therapies remains relatively low. Researchers across the country are striving to enhance responsiveness to immunotherapy drugs. Leading that trend is viroimmunotherapy, or t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 6, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Biomedicines checkpoint blockade Checkpoint inhibitor drugs clinical trials for mesothelioma Dr. Alexander Dash Dr. Manish Patel FDA approval Keytruda immune response cancer immunotherapy response mesothelioma intratumoral injections k Source Type: news

EC awards grant to commercialise Latima ’s cancer virotherapy medicine
The European Commission (EC) has awarded a grant to Latima to commercialise its cancer virotherapy medicine in the European Union (EU) markets. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - July 21, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

PsiOxus begins ovarian cancer trial of paclitaxel with oncolytic virus enadenotucirev
UK-based PsiOxus Therapeutics (PsiOxus) has started its Octave trial of paclitaxel combined with the oncolytic virotherapy enadenotucirev to treat patients with ovarian cancer. (Source: Drug Development Technology)
Source: Drug Development Technology - March 11, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Use of GLV-1h68 for Vaccinia Virotherapy and Monitoring
Herein we describe the use of the vaccinia virus strain GLV-1h68 as a theragnostic agent in cancer models. To date, GLV-1h68 has been used successfully in more than 50 xenograft tumor models. The recombinant vaccinia virus strain has been equipped with heterologous expression cassettes for a luciferase-fluorescent protein fusion gene, bacterial beta-galactosidase, as well as a bacterial glucuronidase. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Cancer Research)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Cancer Research - June 26, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Virotherapy: skin cancer successfully treated with herpes-based drug
‘Virotherapy’ uses modified herpes virus to attack melanoma cells and has potential to overcome cancer even when disease has spread throughout the bodyPatients with aggressive skin cancer have been treated successfully using a drug based on the herpes virus, in a trial that could pave the way for a new generation of cancer treatments.The findings mark the first positive phase 3 trial results for cancer “virotherapy”, where one disease is harnessed and used to attack another. If approved, the drug, called T-VEC, could be more widely available for cancer patients by next year, scientists predicted. Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 27, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science Medical research Cancer Skin cancer Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health UK news Source Type: news

Modified herpes virus 'could combat skin cancer'
Conclusion This randomised controlled trial has demonstrated the effectiveness of a novel injectable immune treatment for advanced melanoma that cannot be surgically removed. The trial has various strengths, including its large sample size, analysis by intention to treat, and blinding of assessors to treatment assignment, which should have reduced the risk of bias. It demonstrated that, overall, significantly more people responded to treatment with T-VEC than GM-CSF injections. It also improved survival by an average of 4.4 months, but this only just reached statistical significance, meaning we can have less confidence i...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medication Medical practice Source Type: news

Virotherapy: skin cancer successfully treated with herpes-based drug
‘Virotherapy’ uses modified herpes virus to attack melanoma cells and has potential to overcome cancer even when disease has spread throughout the bodyPatients with aggressive skin cancer have been treated successfully using a drug based on the herpes virus, in a trial that could pave the way for a new generation of cancer treatments.The findings mark the first positive phase 3 trial results for cancer “virotherapy”, where one disease is harnessed and used to attack another. If approved, the drug, called T-VEC, could be more widely available for cancer patients by next year, scientists predicted. Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 27, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science Medical research Cancer Skin cancer Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health UK news Source Type: news

Skin cancer patients successfully treated with herpes-based drug
‘Virotherapy’ uses modified herpes virus to attack melanoma cells and has potential to overcome cancer even when disease has spread throughout the bodyPatients with aggressive skin cancer have been treated successfully using a drug based on the herpes virus, in a trial that could pave the way for a new generation of cancer treatments.The findings mark the first positive phase 3 trial results for cancer “virotherapy”, where one disease is harnessed and used to attack another. If approved, the drug, called T-VEC, could be more widely available for cancer patients by next year, scientists predicted. Co...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 26, 2015 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Science Medical research Cancer Skin cancer Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health UK news Source Type: news

Upcoming Mesothelioma Symposium Will Focus on Latest Research
Renowned specialist and thoracic surgeon Dr. Robert Cameron, who has pioneered many of the worldwide treatment advances in recent years, will host the 5th Symposium on Lung-Sparing Therapies for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma on May 2. The symposium will be held at the LeMeridien Delfina in Santa Monica, California, close to the UCLA Mesothelioma Comprehensive Research Program, where Cameron serves as director. Although the symposium is designed for physicians, nurses, oncologists, radiologists and pulmonologists, it also will be open to patients, families and anyone wanting to learn more about the latest advancements in t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 21, 2015 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tim Povtak Tags: Research & Clinical Trials Source Type: news

Brain Cancer: Did '60 Minutes' Report Raise False Hope?
(MedPage Today) -- Glioblastoma virotherapy touted on CBS program is promising but preliminary. (Source: MedPage Today Primary Care)
Source: MedPage Today Primary Care - March 30, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Measles and Myeloma: Should You Be Concerned?
With a recent measles outbreak in the US placing attention on the disease and the measles vaccine, IMF Chairman Dr. Brian Durie weighs in on the measles and myeloma. For myeloma patients, the chance of contracting the measles is low because most adults were inoculated when they were children and are therefore immune. In fact, many myeloma patients were ineligible for Dr. Stephen Russell's Mayo Clinic measles virotherapy clinical trial because they were immune to the disease. (Source: International Myeloma Foundation)
Source: International Myeloma Foundation - February 13, 2015 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Armed virus shows promise as treatment for pancreatic cancer
A new combination of two different approaches -- virotherapy and immunotherapy -- is showing 'great promise' as a treatment for pancreatic cancer, according to new research. The study investigated whether the effectiveness of the Vaccinia oncolytic virus -- a virus modified to selectively infect and kill cancer cells -- as a treatment for pancreatic cancer, would be improved by arming it with a gene which modulates the body's immune system. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 23, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Armed virus shows promise as treatment for pancreatic cancer
(Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund) A new combination of two different approaches -- virotherapy and immunotherapy -- is showing 'great promise' as a treatment for pancreatic cancer, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 23, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Measles Virotherapy for Myeloma: New Clinical Trial
Earlier this year, the Mayo Clinic shared exciting results from a clinical trial conducted by Dr. Stephen Russell and his team to test engineered measles virus in myeloma patients. Dr. Russell discussed the approach during the International Myeloma Working Group Conference Series Debate in June. The Mayo Clinic is now enrolling patients in a second clinical trial. (Source: International Myeloma Foundation)
Source: International Myeloma Foundation - September 26, 2014 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

More on Measles Virotherapy for Myeloma
Last week, the popular radio show Science Friday broadcast on National Public Radio explored the exciting science around cancer virotherapy. Guest Dr. Stephen Russell of the Mayo Clinic shared his experience treating myeloma patients with massive doses of the measles virus, which Dr. Durie has blogged about in the past. eek, the popular radio show Science Friday broadcast on National Public Radio explored the exciting science around cancer virotherapy. Guest Dr. Stephen Russell of the Mayo Clinic shared his experience treating myeloma patients with massive doses of the measles virus, which Dr. Durie has blogged about in th...
Source: International Myeloma Foundation - August 15, 2014 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Measles Virus vs. Cancer: Mayo Clinic Radio
On this week's Mayo Clinic Radio program we’ll talk about the groundbreaking research involving the measles virus to fight cancer. The process is called oncolytic virotherapy and Dr. Stephen Russell will be our guest, along with his patient Stacy Erholtz who received 10 million doses – a seemingly lethal amount – of the measles virus to treat her multiple myeloma. We’ll [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 14, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Radio: Measles Virus vs. Cancer
On Saturday, July 12, at 9 a.m. CT, we’ll talk about the groundbreaking research involving the measles virus to fight cancer. The process is called oncolytic virotherapy and Dr. Stephen Russell will be our guest, along with his patient Stacy Erholtz who received 10 million doses – a seemingly lethal amount – of the measles virus to treat her [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 9, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Highlights from the 5th Annual IMWG Summit: Part 2
The IMF's International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) held its 5th Annual Summit this year in Milan, Italy from June 9th-11th. Part 2 of IMF Medical Writer Debbie Birns' comprehensive report on key developments from the Summit is now available HERE. It covers geriatric risk stratification; debates on frontline treatment options; new treatment approaches, such as virotherapy and immunotherapy with transgenic T-cells and chimeric antigen receptors; and new drugs in development. (Source: International Myeloma Foundation)
Source: International Myeloma Foundation - July 8, 2014 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic News Network — Headlines 6/4/14
http://youtu.be/SNB-ufUjmnE   Mayo Clinic News Network Headlines include: Virotherapy-Virus infects and kills cancer Testing concussions on the sidelines Tick-borne illness Journalists: Video is available in the downloads. Click here for script. (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 4, 2014 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

The International Myeloma Foundation Says Virotherapy Approach to Myeloma Could Lead to New Treatment Options
-- Mayo Clinic Team Reports a Remission in Myeloma Patient Treated with a Massive Dose of Engineered Measles Virus -- A New Path Forward in Myeloma Research Stirs Excitement in the Myeloma Community  (Source: International Myeloma Foundation)
Source: International Myeloma Foundation - May 23, 2014 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Measles virus used to treat bone marrow cancer
ConclusionThis research has shown that a modified measles virus can produce a long-term remission of cancerous lesions in a person with multiple myeloma that has not responded to chemotherapy. Patients such as this have limited remaining treatment options, so a new treatment would offer an important development.The article describes the response of two women in a phase I trial who received the highest dose of the virus. One of the women had a lasting response; the other woman showed some signs of an early response, but these were not as good and were not as long-lasting. As yet, we don’t know what proportion of patie...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 16, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Medical practice Source Type: news

Encouraging New Research About Virotherapy for Myeloma
The IMF is very pleased to see research from Dr. Stephen Russell at the Mayo Clinic achieving success and starting to make a difference for patients. (Source: International Myeloma Foundation)
Source: International Myeloma Foundation - May 16, 2014 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic First to Show Virotherapy is Promising Against Multiple Myeloma (pkg)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LImk-KdMT1w ROCHESTER, Minn. — May 14, 2014 — In a proof of principle clinical trial, Mayo Clinic researchers have demonstrated that virotherapy — destroying cancer with a virus that infects and kills cancer cells but spares normal tissues — can be effective against the deadly cancer multiple myeloma. The findings appear in the journal Mayo Clinic [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Rochester News - May 16, 2014 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

“Massive Dose of Measles Vaccine Clears Woman's Cancer,” USAToday.com
Mayo Clinic Cancer Center researchers announced a landmark study where a massive dose of the measles vaccine, enough to inoculate 10 million people, wiped out a Minnesota woman's incurable blood cancer. The Mayo Clinic Cancer Center-one of the 25 NCCN Member Institutions—conducted the clinical trial last year using virotherapy. The method discovered the measles virus wiped out multiple myeloma cancer calls. Researchers engineered the measles virus (MV-NIS) in a single intravenous dose, making i... (Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network)
Source: National Comprehensive Cancer Network - May 15, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ludwig researchers show that infecting just 1 tumor with a virus could boost the systemic effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy
A Ludwig Cancer Research study suggests that the clinical efficacy of checkpoint blockade, a powerful new strategy to harness the immune response to treat cancers, might be dramatically improved if combined with oncolytic virotherapy, an investigational intervention that employs viruses to destroy tumors. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 9, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers show that infecting just one tumor with a virus could boost the systemic effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy
A Ludwig Cancer Research study suggests that the clinical efficacy of checkpoint blockade, a powerful new strategy to harness the immune response to treat cancers, might be dramatically improved if combined with oncolytic virotherapy, an investigational intervention that employs viruses to destroy tumors. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Going viral to target tumors
(Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research) A Ludwig Cancer Research study suggests that the clinical efficacy of checkpoint blockade, a powerful new strategy to harness the immune response to treat cancers, might be dramatically improved if combined with oncolytic virotherapy, an investigational intervention that employs viruses to destroy tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 5, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Oncolytic Adenovirus Characterization: Activity and Immune Responses
Virotherapy in one of the main current applications of recombinant adenoviruses. Oncolytic adenovirus are designed to target tumors, replicate selectively in tumor cells, and elicit immune responses against tumor antigens. Transgene expression in replication-competent oncolytic vectors allows to explore multiple strategies to enhance the potential of virotherapy. In this chapter we describe common in vivo and in vitro techniques used to evaluate the potency and biodistribution of oncolytic viruses. Monitoring immune responses against viral and tumor antigens is crucial as the immune system determines the outcome of virothe...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Microbiology - October 24, 2013 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Two medical pioneers aim to trial a cancer-killing virus. I aim to help out | Alexander Masters
A pair of researchers in Sweden may have a revolutionary cancer treatment on their hands. But a separate revolution will be needed to get it to marketJust north of Stockholm, among the creaking Swedish ice-forests, three revolutions for 2013 are taking place.Revolution One: Two researchers at the University of Uppsala have engineered a virus that will attack cancer. Cheap, precise, with only mild, flu-like side-effects, this plucky little microbe sounds too good to be true. Yet in peer-reviewed articles in top journals, Professor Magnus Essand and Dr Justyna Leja have repeatedly showed that Ad5[CgA-E1A-miR122]PTD views hea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 4, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Alexander Masters Tags: Comment The Guardian Crowdsourcing Health Medical research Society Technology Kickstarter Features Cancer Internet Science Comment is free Source Type: news