Four in five schools worse off under government spending plans
New figures, released today by the School Cuts coalition, reveal that four in five of England’s schools will be worse off next year than they were in 2015. Despite additional funding announced by the government in August, our analysis shows that over 80% of schools – around 16,000 – will still have less money per pupil in 2020 in real terms than they did when the cuts began to bite in 2015. After relentless campaigning by head teachers, school staff and parents, the government finally accepted that schools have suffered billions in funding cuts. Prime Minister Boris Johnson promised school funding would b...
Source: UNISON Health care news - October 1, 2019 Category: UK Health Authors: Charlotte Jeffs Tags: News Press release Jon Richards school school cuts Source Type: news

Is Less Red Meat Better For You? Controversial New Guidelines Say No
(CNN) — Leading nutritional experts in the United States and the UK are fired up about new dietary recommendations claiming there’s no need to reduce your red and processed meat intake for good health. “This is a very irresponsible public health recommendation,” said Dr. Frank Hu, who chairs the nutrition department at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The new guidelines and five corresponding studies are part of a systematic analysis of existing research done by NutriRECS, a recently formed international group of nutritionists and health researchers. NutriRECS says its mission is to &l...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local CNN Red Meat Source Type: news

Teaching trust hires new digital chief
A hospital trust has appointed a new tech chief, months after his predecessor slammed the “excruciating” state of NHS IT as he stepped down from the role. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - October 1, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Graduate Students Are Not Employees, Proposed Rule Says
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) — the federal agency that enforces U.S. labor laws — has proposed a new rule stating that graduate students are not “employees” with a right to unionize. If implemented, the proposed rule would weaken recent unionization efforts by graduate students at private universities. The NLRB does not have jurisdiction over public universities, where graduate students are allowed to form unions when permitted by state law. The proposed regulation would establish that “students who perform any services for compensation, including, but not limited to, teaching o...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 30, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Suicide risk assessment training using an online virtual patient simulation - O'Brien KHM, Fuxman S, Humm L, Tirone N, Pires WJ, Cole A, Goldstein Grumet J.
BACKGROUND: Improving the identification of and intervention with patients at risk for suicide requires innovative training techniques that safely and effectively teach or enhance practitioners' skills. Virtual patient simulations (VPS) can be particularly... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Program and Other Evaluations, Effectiveness Studies Source Type: news

Why Being An Optimist Is Good For Your Heart
(CNN) — Looking on the bright side could save your life. People who look at life from a positive perspective have a much stronger shot at avoiding death from any type of cardiovascular risk than pessimistic people, according to a new meta-analysis of nearly 300,000 people published Friday in the medical journal JAMA. “We observed that an optimist had about a 35% lower risk of major heart complications, such as a cardiac death, stroke or a heart attack, compared to the pessimists in each of these studies,” said cardiologist Dr. Alan Rozanski, a professor of medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat CNN Source Type: news

Dana-Farber, Jimmy Fund unveil logo rebrand
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and its philanthropic arm, The Jimmy Fund, unveiled two new logos Thursday meant to better advertise the relationship between the two entities.   The logo redesigns alter imagery that both institutions have used for 20 years, changing the Harvard crimson logo of the Dana-Farber “D” embedded with a torch-like “F” to a geometric design of a microscopic view of a “D” and “F” intersecting. Dana-Farber is a principal teaching a ffiliate of Harvard Medical… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 26, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jessica Bartlett Source Type: news

Ghana: 'Teach Adolescent Girls On Use of Contraceptives'
[Ghanaian Times] Essuehyia -The Field Assistant of Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana (PPAG), a non-governmental organisation, Mr Joshua Andoh has called on educationists in the country to teach adolescent girls on the need to use contraceptives. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 26, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

NASS Panel Revisits Medtronic Infuse Bone Graft Controversy
A panel at the North American Spine Society (NASS) meeting in Chicago, IL, revisited a controversy that dates back nearly 15 years surrounding Medtronic’s Infuse bone graft, which contains a recombinant version of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The timing of Wednesday’s panel session, “The Biologic Hasn’t Changed but the Evidence Has,” was interesting given Medtronic was already gearing up to announce on Thursday that FDA has signed off on a new Infuse trial that could lead to the product being cleared for a new indication. &...
Source: MDDI - September 25, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Orthopedics Source Type: news

New Game for Ugandan Men Uncovers Behavioral Barriers to Family Planning
By Irene Mirembe, Knowledge management manager, IntraHealth International. ; Susan Tino, Project manager, IntraHealth International Men play Together We Decide during a user test in one of the districts. Photo by Ely McElwee.September 25, 2019Uganda has a high fertility rate and a declining mortality rate, resulting in rapid population growth. This has led to a dependent population that is not conducive to economic production, savings, investment, or development.Uganda also has a high unmet need for family planning— according to the 2016 Uganda Demographic Health Survey, an estimated 28-32% of women do not inte...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Tags: Family Planning & Reproductive Health Community Engagement World Contraception Day Gender Equality Source Type: news

Nigeria: Restoring Olabisi Onabanjo Varsity Teaching Hospital's Past Glory
In this report, Funmi Ogundare, who visited the Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Ogun State, writes that the ailing state-owned tertiary institution requires a lot of efforts and facilities by the current administration to regain its past glory. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 25, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

First ever complete online learning platform for pharmacy schools launched in the UK
The Royal Pharmaceutical Society has launched a revolutionary new digital platform to help pharmacy schools personalise their teaching and to enable students to achieve success in the MPharm degree. (Source: Royal Pharmaceutical Society News)
Source: Royal Pharmaceutical Society News - September 24, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Ghana: Court Orders Ho Teaching Hospital to Release Corpse to Rightful Claimant
[Ghanaian Times] THE grief of Mr Bright Ohene, 34, a driver at Dzolo-Gbogame, in the Ho West District over the death of his younger sister, Believe Ohene, a nurse, took a turn for the worse when he turned up at the Ho Teaching Hospital to settle the mortuary bills and process the necessary paper for the removal of the corpse from the mortuary. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 24, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Teaching trust flagged as cancer outlier two years in a row
A teaching hospital has redesigned part of its cancer service after being flagged as an outlier in two national clinical audits. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - September 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Make Learning Fun, and Kids Learn More
FRIDAY, Sept. 20, 2019 -- Make it fun, and they will learn. That's the conclusion of a new Canadian study that analyzed a kindergarten teaching program that favors playful activities and socializing over sit-down lectures. In the end, the innovative... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - September 20, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How Understanding the History of the Earth ’s Climate Can Offer Hope Amid Crisis
There is no longer any debate that global warming is real, and that it is happening now at an alarming rate. It is transforming the global climate system before our eyes. The rise of fossil-fueled economies over the past 200 years, and especially the accelerating CO2 emissions since the end of World War II, is clearly the cause of our mounting climate crisis. But even though 99% of climate scientists recognize what is happening, it can still be difficult to grasp something of such magnitude. “Climate change” inherently involves a historical perspective. As world leaders convene on Monday for the 2019 Climate Ac...
Source: TIME: Science - September 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: John Brooke, Michael Bevis and Steve Rissing Tags: Uncategorized Environment Opinion Science Source Type: news

How I Learned to Be a Better Doctor From My Wife ’s Struggle With Alzheimer’s
“Get out! Get out!” My wife, Joan, having just woken up, was screaming, and hitting out wildly at the stranger in her bed. She was in a panic, her body shaking with fright. “Get away from here. Get out!” The man she perceived as a stranger was me, her husband of more than forty years. Joan was eight years into the destructive course of atypical early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, a horrific disorder that ravaged her, leaving her blind and with serious dementia. At that moment, she was experiencing something called Capgras Syndrome, in which patients become deluded that those close to them and the...
Source: TIME: Health - September 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Arthur Kleinman Tags: Uncategorized Books health ideas Source Type: news

What industry can teach academia
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Mao, Y. Tags: Working Life Source Type: news

3D virtual reality models help yield better surgical outcomes
This study was for kidney cancer, but the benefits of using 3D models for surgical planning will translate to many other types of cancer operations, such as prostate, lung, liver and pancreas.”The study ’s other authors are Dr. David Thiel, Mayo Clinic, Florida; Dr. Eric Wallen, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Dr. Jennifer Linehan, John Wayne Cancer Institute, Providence Saint John’s Health Center, Santa Monica; Dr. Wesley White, University of Tennessee Medical Center, Knoxville; Dr. Ketan Badani, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York; and Dr. James Porter, Swedish Urology Group, Se...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 18, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Sudan: Eight Die As 1K+ Malaria Cases Recorded in North Darfur
[Radio Dabanga] El Fasher / Nyala / Blue Nile -At least eight people have died of malaria in North Darfur this week, while doctors at El Fasher Teaching Hospital recorded at least 1,000 malaria cases. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - September 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

AAFP to Congress: Reauthorize THCGME Program Now
The AAFP is pressing Congress to reauthorize funding for the Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education program before it expires Sept. 30 and urges members to join a Speak Out campaign on this critical issue. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - September 17, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Knowledge IS power: Teaching teens about junk food promotes healthy eating habits
(Natural News) What if getting your teens to eat healthier was as easy as teaching them more about junk food and its marketing tactics? If you’re thinking that would never work, think again: A new study has shown that educating teens about junk food and how ads influence them can cut their junk food buying habits... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

1 in 16 American Women Were Forced or Coerced Into Sex as Teens, Study Finds
(CHICAGO) — The first sexual experience for 1 in 16 U.S. women was forced or coerced intercourse in their early teens, encounters that for some may have had lasting health repercussions, a study suggests. The results were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. The experiences amount to rape, the authors say, although they relied on a national survey that didn’t use the word in asking women about forced sex. Almost 7 percent of women surveyed said their first sexual intercourse experience was involuntary; it happened at age 15 on average and the man was often several years older. And almost half of those wo...
Source: TIME: Health - September 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LINDSEY TANNER / AP Tags: Uncategorized consent onetime Sex Source Type: news

7% of U.S. Women Say Their First Sexual Experience Was Involuntary. That Could Have Long-Term Health Impacts, a Study Finds
(CHICAGO) — The first sexual experience for 1 in 16 U.S. women was forced or coerced intercourse in their early teens, encounters that for some may have had lasting health repercussions, a study suggests. The results were published Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine. The experiences amount to rape, the authors say, although they relied on a national survey that didn’t use the word in asking women about forced sex. Almost 7 percent of women surveyed said their first sexual intercourse experience was involuntary; it happened at age 15 on average and the man was often several years older. And almost half of those wo...
Source: TIME: Health - September 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LINDSEY TANNER / AP Tags: Uncategorized consent onetime Sex Source Type: news

Cochrane International Mobility – launch of pilot programme
Getting involved in Cochrane ’s work means becoming part of a global community. Connect with Cochrane Groups across the world through the Cochrane International Mobility programme!TheCochrane International Mobility programme builds on previoussuccessful student exchanges involving Cochrane Centres around the world. A broader initiative involving twelve Cochrane Groups has now been launched as a pilot by Cochrane People Services Department.Successful applicants will complete a placement in a host Group, learning more about the production, use and knowledge translation of Cochrane reviews.Gain skills and experienc...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 16, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Cochrane International Mobility
Getting involved in Cochrane ’s work means becoming part of a global community. Connect with Cochrane Groups across the world through the Cochrane International Mobility programme!TheCochrane International Mobility programme builds on previoussuccessful student exchanges involving Cochrane Centres around the world. A broader initiative involving multiple Cochrane Groups has  been launched by Cochrane People Services Department.Successful applicants will complete a placement in a host Group, learning more about the production, use and knowledge translation of Cochrane reviews.Gain skills and experienceArrang...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - September 16, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Teaching trust revamps theatres after inspectors uncover infection risks
A series of theatre upgrades have been carried out at an Oxford hospital after inspectors found major infection risks at the site. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - September 16, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Oti Mabuse health: Strictly Come Dancing star takes supplements to 'feed her brain'
OTI MABUSE, best known for being one of the professional dancers on Strictly Come Dancing, knows the importance of staying healthy, particularly when it comes to hours of learning and teaching dance routines. As part of her regime, the dancer revealed she likes to get a boost from supplements. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - September 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Majority Of Teachers Believe Outdated Myths Like Being'Left-' Or'Right-Brained,' Survey Finds
The survey concludes that “teachers are not being provided with the knowledge to make their teaching truly effective.” (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - September 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Christopher Rim, Contributor Source Type: news

U-turn on plans to strip trust of cancer scanning service
Specialist cancer scans will continue to be provided by a major teaching trust after NHS England backtracked on a decision to award the work solely to a private provider. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - September 12, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Can a 4,815-Mile Wall of Trees Help Curb Climate Change in Africa?
The seedlings are ready. One hundred and fifty thousand shoots of drought-resistant acacia, hardy baobab and Moringa spill out of their black plastic casings. The ground has been prepared with scores of kilometer-long furrows leading to a horizon studded with skeletal thorn trees. It’s early August, and in less than a week, 399 volunteers from 27 countries will arrive in this remote corner of northern Senegal to participate in one of the world’s most audacious efforts to combat the effects of climate change: an $8 billion plan to reforest 247 million acres of degraded land across the width of Africa, stretching...
Source: TIME: Science - September 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker / Mbar Toubab, Senegal Tags: Uncategorized Africa Climate 2019 climate change Source Type: news

Nigeria: Lasuth Cardiologist, Team Record Another Medical Feat
[This Day] A medical team comprising of an Interventional Cardiologist and other medical doctors recently carried out a lifesaving surgery by using improvised methods in the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH). (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 12, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Veterinarians Face Unique Issues That Make Suicide One of the Profession ’s Big Worries
Dr. Will McCauley had just finished his shift at a small Dallas animal clinic when he went home, fed his pet pot-bellied pig and then held a loaded handgun to his head. The 33-year-old veterinarian was wracked with student debt and worn down by the daily demands at work, which included euthanizing dogs and cats and being vilified by pet owners for not meeting their expectations. “I was tired in this miserable state of mind,” he says. “It just drained me so much.” For reasons he attributes to either fear or hope, McCauley didn’t kill himself that summer day in 2016, and he quit his job later th...
Source: TIME: Health - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized animals health Suicide suicide prevention Source Type: news

Nigeria: Govt Vows to Revitalise Health Sector, Commences Assessment Tour
[This Day] Abuja -As part of its plans to revitalise the Nigeria's health sector, the federal government said it has commenced an assessment tour of all federal teaching hospitals and other tertiary health institutions in the country. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 12, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Mitochondria teach ribosome assembly
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 12, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Karbstein, K. Tags: perspective Source Type: news

Broader concepts of safeguarding: to teach, nurture, care and protect - Sidebotham P.
The primary role of a teacher is to teach: to educate, impart knowledge and facilitate learning. It is what teachers are trained to do, and what they do best. And yet, the teachers who tend to stand out are those who see their role as something more than j... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

We're Missing Something in Health Worker Training
By Casey Bishopp, Communications officer, IntraHealth International Dr. Janet Muriuki addresses a group of attendees at SwitchPoint Shibuya. Photo courtesy of The Global Fund/Shugo Takemi.September 11, 2019The people who attend to us when we’re ill, injured, worried about our health, or scared for the well-being of our loved ones are face-to-face with conflict, end of life, and terminal illness. But are health students adequately prepared to work under such mental stress? According to Health economist and health policy analyst Dr. Akiko Maeda, these issues aren’t properly addressed in schools and in the des...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbishopp Tags: Mental Health Education & Performance Health Workers Source Type: news

What the Ingebrigtsen Brothers Can Teach Us About Nature, Nurture and Running
There ’s more than one right way to rear and shape young athletes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gretchen Reynolds Tags: Athletics and Sports Running Youth Track and Field Genetics and Heredity Source Type: news

Road rage is on the rise. Here's how to survive these dangerous encounters.
Just last week, a Wisconsin woman teaching her teenage son to drive was shot to death in a road rage incident after a minor car crash. In late August, an Atlanta man allegedly ran over another man he thought was throwing golf balls at his car. In July, a road-raging Alabama woman tried to shoot another vehicle but shot her husband instead. And that same month in Houston, two young children and their parents were injured in an apparent road rage incident when a driver fired a gun at their car, igniting the fireworks inside. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - September 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

South Africa: Remembering David Sanders - a Humble, Visionary Public Health Activist
[The Conversation Africa] The sudden death of public health scholar Professor David Sanders has left people across the globe shocked and with a deep sense of loss. David was still, at the age of 74, actively involved in research, writing, teaching, mentoring and activism. This, after a long career that saw him contribute enormously to many African countries' health sectors - most notably in Zimbabwe and South Africa. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 10, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

UW, Gonzaga sign 12-year lease on $60M medical teaching center in Spokane
The 80,000-square-foot building will house the University of Washington School of Medicine-Gonzaga University Regional Health Partnership. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 10, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Megan Campbell Source Type: news

The magicians trying to change the world – one card trick at a time
Forget trying to saw Debbie McGee in half – some conjurers are using their skills to help surgeons, refugee children and even imagine a better futureWhat image does the word “magic” conjure up? Paul Daniels sawing Debbie McGee in half, or Harry Potter chanting “Expecto patronum”? Or perhaps just a sweaty little man (they are almost always men) trying gamely to placate a party of sugar-high six-year-olds with balloons while their parents slip out the back?With its razzmatazz, secrecy and ritualised trickery, being a magician is not a calling most associate with a social conscience. But there is...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Claire Armitstead Tags: Magic Medical research Psychology Global development Science Stage Source Type: news

Ghana: KBTH Applies New Technology for Kidney Stones Treatment
[Ghanaian Times] The Korle Bu Teaching Hospital (KBTH) has introduced Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL) technology, for the treatment of patients suffering from kidney stones diseases. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 9, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

An analysis of causes of trauma, spectrum of injuries and treatment outcomes in patients treated at Multitrauma Centre of the University Teaching Hospital No 1 in Szczecin in 2015. Comparison of results from years 2015 and 2007 - Dziubi ński D, Abramczyk U, Ciechanowicz D, Kozłowski J, Pakulski C, Żyluk A.
INTRODUCTION: Multitrauma is defined as injury involving two or more different body parts, with a condition that at least one of these injuries is life-threatening. They represent serious traumas, requiring treatment in the intensive care units and frequen... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 7, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

North Carolina Paramedic Loses Leg After Crash
  Paramedic Heather Haynes speaks to WGHP-TV from her hospital bed after losing part of her leg after being hit. LEXINGTON, N.C – A paramedic pinned between an ambulance and car last month lost part of her leg in the crash but is not giving up hope. "I want to keep going, because, first of all, I didn't go through paramedic school for two years for nothing, and because I have four kids looking at me," Heather Haynes said in a video message to WGHP-TV from her hospital bed. "If I give up, then it's going to teach them that you just give up no matter what. So, I'm just going to keep going, ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - September 6, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Trauma News News Videos Source Type: news

North Carolina Paramedic Loses Leg After Crash
  Paramedic Heather Haynes speaks to WGHP-TV from her hospital bed after losing part of her leg after being hit. LEXINGTON, N.C – A paramedic pinned between an ambulance and car last month lost part of her leg in the crash but is not giving up hope. "I want to keep going, because, first of all, I didn't go through paramedic school for two years for nothing, and because I have four kids looking at me," Heather Haynes said in a video message to WGHP-TV from her hospital bed. "If I give up, then it's going to teach them that you just give up no matter what. So, I'm just going to keep going, ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 6, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Trauma News News Videos Source Type: news

Supporting a Human-Centered Home Health System in Jordan
By Mirna Fakhoury, Project manager, USAID Jordan Competitiveness Program ; Omar Shamieh, Chairman, Department of Palliative Care ; Bridget Johnston, Research Fellow, Trinity College Dublin School of Medicine Jordanian home care patient Zuhdiyyah, age 76, receives a visit from her care team--no hospital trip required. Photo by USAID.September 09, 2019Jordan’s health care system is considered one of the more modern in the Middle East, and many patients travel from neighboring countries to access its medical offerings. However, Jordan struggles with rising health care costs, an aging population with a changing d...
Source: IntraHealth International - September 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Health Workforce & Systems Nurses Source Type: news

The Jan Twomey story — Empowering and connecting
Earlier this year Jan had a big decision to make. In her early 60s, she could leave pharma and pursue her dream to join the crew on the Mercy ship – serving patients in need around Africa - or stay with Takeda through their transition and lead the Medical team for Oceania. She chose to stay and here’s why.  “It gives me a lot of pleasure helping my team to be happy and thrive,” says Jan.  Jan was raised to really think about society and people. Her father encouraged vigorous debate, pushing Jan to defend her beliefs and statements. As a child of the 70’s, Jan was on a mission to...
Source: EyeForPharma - September 6, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Jill Donahue Source Type: news

Ignorant history professor claims that "inaction" on climate change is going to cause Florida to SINK from hurricanes
(Natural News) A history professor at the University of Michigan is worried that if Florida Governor Ron DeSantis fails to soon reverse his “inaction” on climate change that the Sunshine State “will literally sink” due to hurricanes. According to Juan Cole, who teaches Middle Eastern and South Asian history, and who writes for multiple far-left... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news