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Boy's parents tried to cure eye tumour using black magic
Bongre Anton Peter, from Papua New Guinea, had signs of retinoblastoma when he was a year old. Eye drops and painkillers failed to help, as his desperate parents turned to traditional tribal beliefs. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Visunex Medical raises $20m Series B for PanoCam neonate eye scanners
Visunex Medical Systems said last week that it raised a $20 million Series B round for its PanoCam line of neonatal eye imaging systems. Fremont, Calif.-based Visunex said the PanoCam line includes the LT and Pro wireless systems and a 3rd system set to debut in June. “The interest in the medical investment community to be part of this funding round turned out to be much more than we had anticipated,” founder & CEO Wei Su said in prepared remarks. “This new round of funding brings the total investment into Visunex Medical to $32 million, and will allow the company to expa...
Source: Mass Device - May 8, 2017 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Funding Roundup Optical/Ophthalmic Wall Street Beat Visunex Source Type: news

RETINOBLASTOMA RELATED1 mediates germline entry in Arabidopsis
To produce seeds, flowering plants need to specify somatic cells to undergo meiosis. Here, we reveal a regulatory cascade that controls the entry into meiosis starting with a group of redundantly acting cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors of the KIP-RELATED PROTEIN (KRP) class. KRPs function by restricting CDKA;1–dependent inactivation of the Arabidopsis Retinoblastoma homolog RBR1. In rbr1 and krp triple mutants, designated meiocytes undergo several mitotic divisions, resulting in the formation of supernumerary meiocytes that give rise to multiple reproductive units per future seed. One function of RBR1 is the ...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Zhao, X., Bramsiepe, J., Van Durme, M., Komaki, S., Prusicki, M. A., Maruyama, D., Forner, J., Medzihradszky, A., Wijnker, E., Harashima, H., Lu, Y., Schmidt, A., Guthörl, D., Logrono, R. S., Guan, Y., Pochon, G., Grossniklaus, U., Laux, T., Higas Tags: Botany, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

What Causes Uveitis?
Discussion Inflammation of the middle layer of the eye, or uvea, is termed uveitis. Uveitis can be divided into anterior, intermediate or posterior uveitis by involving the anterior (iris and ciliary body), intermediate (vitreous) or posterior (choroid and usually retina) compartments. Panuveitis involves all 3 compartments. Duration can also be used to classify uveitis. Acute is 6 weeks and> 3 months is chronic persistent uveitis. Episodic periods of inactivity and reactivity that last more than 3 months are called recurrent uveitis. A third way to characterize uveitis is if it is granulomatous or not. Uveitis increase...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - April 3, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Of Course Cancer Isn't Random
Despite the study in one of the world’s most prestigious scientific journals, and the high-profile media coverage of it: no, cancer is absolutely NOT mostly random and a product of “bad luck.” It wasn’t true when these same investigators published very similar work generating very similar media hype and nonsense two years ago, and it isn’t true now.  That’s what I want to talk about, but must hasten to append the obvious proviso: cancer can, rarely, be or at least seem utterly random. But to call cancer random because a child rarely gets retinoblastoma or glioblastoma, or ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For Group D Retinoblastoma, Intra-arterial May Beat IV Chemo For Group D Retinoblastoma, Intra-arterial May Beat IV Chemo
For children with group D retinoblastoma, first-line intra-arterial chemo may be better than first-line intravenous chemo , a retrospective study from Switzerland suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - December 27, 2016 Category: Pathology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Groundbreaking discovery has potential to improve therapies for cancer and other diseases
The Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) has long been studied for its role in cell growth and the prevention of cancer. Scientists have now discovered that pRB plays another, larger role with the potential to enhance therapies for cancer and other diseases such as HIV. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - December 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Girl diagnosed with retinoblastoma after mother noticed white glow behind her pupil
Tyraah Bell-Lama, from Reading, was just eight months old when she was taken to the doctor with a white glow behind her baby's eye. Tests revealed she had retinoblastoma. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Groundbreaking discovery has potential to improve therapies for cancer and other diseases
(Lawson Health Research Institute) The Retinoblastoma protein (pRB) has long been studied for its role in cell growth and the prevention of cancer. In a new study by Lawson Health Research Institute, scientists have discovered that pRB plays another, larger role with the potential to enhance therapies for cancer and other diseases such as HIV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 15, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

More boys are diagnosed with cancer than girls worldwide - why?
This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Pediatric ophthalmology
Childhood glaucomaEye movement disordersEye cancerOptic nerve disorders We use the latest advances in pediatric ophthalmology to optimize your child ’s vision and eye health.Diagnosis and treatment of pediatric eye diseasesPrompt identification of childhood eye and vision problems is often the best way to preserve or regain vision.   This applies to common pediatric eye conditions such as refractive error requiring eyeglasses, amblyopia (or lazy eye) and strabismus (eyes that are not straight), as well as serious eye conditions such as childhood cataract, glaucoma, retinopathy of prematurity, and an eye tumor c...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - August 8, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Dr. Alfred G. Knudson, the ‘Mendel of Cancer Genetics,’ Dies at 93
A 1971 theory on the inheritable nature of retinoblastoma in children, proved in 1986, is credited with helping advance the framework of how cancers are studied. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: KENNETH CHANG Tags: Deaths (Obituaries) Genetics and Heredity Research Cancer Knudson, Alfred G Philadelphia (Pa) Source Type: news

Eye-Preserving Retinoblastoma Therapy Can Compromise SurvivalEye-Preserving Retinoblastoma Therapy Can Compromise Survival
The goal of preserving vision and the risk of reduced long-term overall survival must be balanced against each other when treating heritable retinoblastoma, say researchers from Germany. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

What Are The Most Common Pediatric Cancers?
Discussion Cancer occurs in all ages including children. Fortunately cancer is much less common in the pediatric age group accounting for
Source: PediatricEducation.org - July 4, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pond scum and the gene pool: One critical gene in green algae responsible for multicellular evolution, understanding of cancer origin
A single gene is responsible for the evolution of multicellular organisms, new research indicates. Scientists were looking for what caused single-celled organisms to evolve into multicellular organisms when they discovered the importance of a single gene, retinoblastoma, or RB. RB, known for being defective in cancer patients, is a critical gene necessary for multicellular life; previous theories have indicated that multiple genes might be responsible for multicellularity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - May 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study: Combination therapy improves retinoblastoma outcome
Stephen FellerLOS ANGELES, April 15 (UPI) -- Researchers found a combination of chemotherapy and a protein inhibitor improves the outcome of children with retinoblastoma, according to a recent study. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - April 15, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Combination therapy may offer better outcomes for patients with retinoblastoma
Targeting survivin -- a protein that inhibits apoptosis or cell death -- enhances the effectiveness of chemotherapy in cells and mouse models of retinoblastoma (Rb), the most common malignant tumor of the eye in children, researchers report. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Combination therapy may offer better outcomes for patients with retinoblastoma
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have demonstrated that targeting survivin -- a protein that inhibits apoptosis or cell death -- enhances the effectiveness of chemotherapy in cells and mouse models of retinoblastoma (Rb), the most common malignant tumor of the eye in children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Mother Gemma Edgar and son Noah are BOTH battling cancer
Gemma Edgar, 30, of Colchester, had surgery to cut out her glioblastoma multiforme. But later that year her son Noah, 18 months, was found to have retinoblastoma - a rare type of eye cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Catching up with Poppy: Life after an eye tumor
Poppy with her little sister Hazel (Courtesy of Dana Biagini) When Poppy Biagini was just four months old, her family got news no parent wants to hear — that she had a rare, rapidly growing tumor in her right eye called a retinoblastoma. That was almost three years ago. But if you looked at Poppy today, you’d be hard pressed to tell that she’s anything other than your average 3-year-old who loves Curious George, swim class and playing dress-up. “She knows that there’s something a little different with her eye than everyone else’s,” her father Dana says. “But she’s handl...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - February 9, 2016 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tom Ulrich Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories Ankoor Shah Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center Darren Orbach eye tumor intra-arterial chemotherapy retinoblastoma Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the long-term implications for children with cancers affecting vision?
Retinoblastoma is the most common childhood cancer of the eye. New research investigates the health implications for survivors over the ensuing decades. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 11, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Simple test predicts response to chemotherapy in lung cancer patients
(Lawson Health Research Institute) Scientists at Lawson Health Research Institute have found that adenocarcinoma patients who undergo chemotherapy and surgery experience significantly improved survival rates when their tumor is lacking the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein. This new information is very useful as it may predict which patients will respond best to chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 3, 2015 Category: Biology Source Type: news

InfantSEE: Vision For Your Baby's Future
Your baby's eyes developed in utero as an extension of the brain. At birth, your baby could see light and dark, but not colors or details. Outside stimuli began to interact with your newborn's eyes and vision began to form. View image | gettyimages.com Vision and the way the brain uses visual information, are skills that a baby learns over time. The greatest amount of growth in vision and processing visual information occurs during your baby's first year of life. During this time, your baby will learn how to focus on an object and how to move the eyes in response to stimuli. All of these vision milestones will allow your ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Retinoblastoma Outcomes Worse for Poor, Minority Children Retinoblastoma Outcomes Worse for Poor, Minority Children
Hispanic and socially disadvantaged children are more likely to lose their affected eye than non-Hispanic children and those from advantaged communities. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 7, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Ethnic, racial, socioeconomic disparities in retinoblastoma in children
Ethnic, racial and socioeconomic disparities appear to exist among children with retinoblastoma, a once uniformly fatal but now treatable eye cancer, and those disparities are associated with greater risks for advanced disease and undergoing enucleation (removal of the eye), according to an article. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 5, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Disparities in outcomes for rare pediatric cancer suggest unequal access to primary care
(Dana-Farber Cancer Institute) Disparities in outcomes for children with retinoblastoma -- a rare eye tumor usually discovered in routine pediatric check-ups -- suggest unequal access to primary care, researchers from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center report in a study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics. Although virtually all the children in the study survived, Hispanic children and children who lived in disadvantaged areas were more likely to lose an eye due to late diagnosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 5, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Young dad could face life in prison after robbing bank to pay for daughter's exorbitant cancer treatment
(NaturalNews) It's a sad tale that reflects much of what has gone wrong in America.I'm talking about the story of Brailynn Randolph, a one-year-old girl who is receiving chemotherapy for the treatment of retinoblastoma, a form of eye cancer, and her father, Brian Randolph, who... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 9, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Golden glow baby Mason Page has his eye removed after Retinoblastoma
New Zealand baby Mason Page has surgery to remove his left eye in Auckland on Thursday - now doctors will analyse the eye to reveal whether it was Coats' disease or a rare form of cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 14, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemosurgery Appears No Less Safe Than Enucleation in Advanced Eye CancerChemosurgery Appears No Less Safe Than Enucleation in Advanced Eye Cancer
Ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) for advanced-stage retinoblastoma appears at least as safe as enucleation, according to New York-based researchers. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines - July 27, 2015 Category: Opthalmology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

New understanding of retinoblastoma proteins' role in cell death and cancer progression
A new review article focuses on RB role in apoptosis provides a comprehensive overview on the role of RB proteins in the coordinated control of cell decisions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 2, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gene modulation method may provide insight on regrowing inner-ear sensory hair cells
An expert in the biology and physiology of the inner ear has developed a method to temporally modify the expression of the retinoblastoma-1 gene in mice. Modulation of the RB1 gene can allow for the regrowth of cells in the inner ear and potentially restore hearing and balance caused by the loss of sensory hair cells. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 11, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Fintan Morley-Smith to have eyes removed or risk dying from cancer
At three months old Fintan Morley-Smith, from Buckinghamshire, was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma, a rare eye cancer. At four his first eye was removed, and at six doctors removed his second eye. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Toddler's tumour revealed by camera flash in picture
Stacey Sutherland's son diagnosed with retinoblastoma, rare type of eye cancer, after mother notices flash on picture shows white pupil (Source: Telegraph Health)
Source: Telegraph Health - May 18, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: retinoblastoma Newcastle Stacey Sutherland eye cancer Royal Victoria Infirmary flash spots tumour Polar Express County Durham Source Type: news

Murphy keeps smiling after losing an eye to cancer
Strangers often tell Christine and Bryan that their daughter Murphy has such big, beautiful eyes. What they don’t know is that one of her eyes is not real. “We just want to say, ‘You have no idea!’, but we just smile and say, ‘thank you!’” Murphy before surgery When Murphy was five months old, Christine noticed that her daughter’s right pupil looked a bit iridescent. As a neurological nurse, she knew what to do to test a patient’s eyesight: she covered her daughter’s right eye to no effect. But when she covered the left eye, “Murphy lost her mind.” Chr...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - April 7, 2015 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jenny Fernandez Tags: Cancer Our patients’ stories Ankoor Shah Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center MRI retinoblastoma Source Type: news

New role uncovered for 'oldest' tumor suppressor gene
This study has found that the gene also has another important function, in helping to 'glue' severed strands of DNA back together. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 26, 2015 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Adult survivors of childhood eye cancer experience few cognitive or social setbacks
Adult survivors of retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer that usually develops in early childhood, have few cognitive or social problems decades following their diagnosis and treatment, researchers report. The findings offer good news for patients, but it's important to continue to monitor for long-term effects as the brain changes throughout life. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 24, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Adult survivors of childhood eye cancer experience few cognitive or social setbacks
(Wiley) Adult survivors of retinoblastoma, a type of eye cancer that usually develops in early childhood, have few cognitive or social problems decades following their diagnosis and treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 24, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Survivors of childhood eye cancer experience normal cognitive functioning as adults
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) Most long-term survivors of retinoblastoma, particularly those who had been diagnosed with tumors by their first birthdays, have normal cognitive function as adults, according to a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study. The research, which appears in the current issue of the journal Cancer, found that the vast majority of survivors work full time, live independently and fulfill other milestones of adult life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 24, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Survivors of childhood eye cancer experience normal cognitive functioning as adults
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital study found adults diagnosed with retinoblastoma as infants often performed better on tasks than survivors diagnosed at an older age; suggests brain may compensate for early insult. (Tara Brinkman, PhD) (Source: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital)
Source: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital - November 24, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

Retinoblastoma: 50 Years of Progress, With More to Be DoneRetinoblastoma: 50 Years of Progress, With More to Be Done
Dr Roger Steinert shares the key points from the Jackson Memorial Lecture on retinoblastoma. Despite treatment advances, more remains to be done to combat this significant global health problem. Medscape Ophthalmology (Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Ophthalmology Headlines - November 14, 2014 Category: Opthalmology Tags: Ophthalmology Commentary Source Type: news

New app scours baby pictures for eye health risks
A new app from Baylor University takes advantage of a smartphone’s camera — and of the smartphone owner’s tendency to take a lot of pictures — to potentially detect rare eye cancers in babies. Baylor chemist Bryan Shaw and Baylor computer scientist Greg Hamerly have launched the White Eye Detection app, in which parents can upload […] (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - November 6, 2014 Category: Information Technology Authors: Jonah Comstock Tags: Uncategorized Baylor University infant health iPhone eye health Pediatrics retinoblastoma White Eye Detection app Source Type: news

Mycosis Fungoides and Leiomyosarcoma – Cancer Therapeutic Drugs and...
RnRMarketResearch.com adds “Mycosis Fungoides and Leiomyosarcoma – Pipeline Review, H2 2014” to its store. The report provides an overview of the Mycosis Fungoides and Leiomyosarcoma therapeutic...(PRWeb October 31, 2014)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014-h2-retinoblastoma/leiomyosarcoma-pipeline/prweb12293087.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - November 1, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New treatment designed to save more eyes from cancer
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have developed a new technique for treating the eye cancer retinoblastoma to improve the odds for preventing eye loss, blindness or death in children with advanced forms of the disease. The new procedure is credited saving the eyesight of a 4-year-old girl. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 14, 2014 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news