Scientists warn too much of 'superfood' porridge topping flaxseed 'could cause cyanide poisoning' 
Flaxseed contains a naturally occurring compound that can produce cyanide gas as it degrades. Adults could end up ill if they consume just three teaspoons of it in one sitting. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dig in! Archaeologists serve up ancient menus for modern tables
Porridge, loaves and sauces Egyptians and Romans consumed have become today ’s cookbook crazeDuringa 1954 BBC documentary about Tollund Man, the mysterious body of a hanged man discovered in a peat bog in Denmark, the noted archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler ate a reconstruction of the 2,000-year-old ’s last meal. After tasting the porridge of barley, linseed and mustard seeds, he dabbed at his moustache and declared the mystery was solved: Tollund Man had killed himself rather than eat another spoonful.Food reconstruction has come a long way since then. Last week Seamus Blackley, a scientist more famous for creating t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: James Tapper Tags: Archaeology Food Roman Britain World news Bread UK news Beer Microbiology Science Source Type: news

Here ’s What Eating Processed Foods for Two Weeks Does to Your Body
Ultra-processed foods—the kinds made irresistible by sugar, fat and salt—are ubiquitous in the U.S., making up as much as 60% of the average American diet. But a small, intensive new study published in the journal Cell Metabolism shows that their low price and convenience comes at a cost to health. When people ate a highly processed diet for two weeks, they consumed far more calories and gained more weight and body fat than they did when they ate a less processed diet—even though both diets had the same amounts of nutrients like sugar, fat and sodium. It wasn’t a shock to find ultra-processed foods ...
Source: TIME: Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition embargoed study Source Type: news

Council worker, 21, who lived off Ready Brek porridge struck down with SEPSIS
Raffaella Franza, of Brighton, developed a fear of food after choking twice as a child, In September 2018, a sinus infection developed into potentially fatal sepsis. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

In the Loop: Practice -- and moulage -- makes perfect inside Mayo Clinic's Simulation Centers
Amy Lannen often leaves notes warning her colleagues not to eat the Jell-O, cocoa powder, oatmeal and other foods she keeps on a shelf at work. It's not that she's a snack hoarder. (At least not that we know of.) Lannen's goodies are actually the tools of her trade. Lannen, who works at the J. Wayne [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 29, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Does Sugar Make Kids Hyper? That ’ s Largely A Myth
(CNN) — Does sugar make kids hyper? Maybe. “If you look at the peer-reviewed evidence, we cannot say sugar absolutely makes kids hyper; however, you can’t discount that sugar may have a slight effect” on behavior, said Kristi L. King, senior pediatric dietitian at Texas Children’s Hospital and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In the mid-1990s, a meta-analysis reviewed 16 studies on sugar’s effects in children. The research, published in the medical journal JAMA, concluded that sugar does not affect behavior or cognitive performance in children. “However, a sm...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: News Health CNN Sugar Source Type: news

Forget adding blueberries to your porridge, now scientist say you should fork out for chokeberries
Chokeberries, also known as aronia berries, are high in antioxidants. Polish scientists tested their ability to be heated in porridge in a study and found they are packed with vitamins. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Holy fudge: soft foods helped humans form 'f' and 'v' sounds – study
Diet of porridge and gruel shaped human faces, which diversified English languageThe texts of the 16th century were first to record the F-word for posterity. It appeared in William Dunbar ’s poem A Brash of Wowing in 1503 and later, thanks to an angry monk, in a notescrawled in the margin of a 1528 copy of De Officiis, Cicero ’s moral manifesto.But according to researchers, the English language might never have enjoyed a richness of F-words had it not been for early farmers and the food processing they favoured. Dairy products and other soft foods, such as gruel, porridge, soup and stews, helped shape our faces, the re...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Anthropology Linguistics World news Food Evolution Biology Source Type: news

Eczema: The remedy to prevent dry and itchy skin at home - and all you need is porridge
ECZEMA could be treated with creams, moisturisers and ointments. But how can you get rid of the dry skin condition at home? This is an easy and natural remedy to prevent the itchy and sore signs of eczema - and all you need is some porridge. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What types of food are surprisingly unhealthful?
Unhealthful food types include some breads, bottled smoothies, instant oatmeal, and trail mix. Learn more about the most surprisingly unhealthful foods here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Is Breakfast Really Good For You? Here ’s What the Science Says
You’ve heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. But you’ve also probably heard that it’s fine to skip. A new research review published in The BMJ only adds to the debate: It analyzed 13 breakfast studies and found that eating a morning meal was not a reliable way to lose weight, and that skipping breakfast likely does not lead to weight gain. So should you say goodbye to your eggs and toast? Here’s what the science says about breakfast. Does eating breakfast help you lose weight? The weight-loss question has been central to the breakfast debate for years, in part because several h...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What are the benefits of oatmeal?
Oatmeal is a popular breakfast food because it is high in protein and dietary fiber. In this article, learn about the benefits of oatmeal and how to make it. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Making Mayo's Recipes: Overnight refrigerator oatmeal
Do this easy pre-made breakfast tonight to pack and go tomorrow. Just place ingredients for overnight refrigerator oatmeal in a mason jar, and you'll have breakfast ready in the morning. Loaded with calcium, protein and fiber, these jars keep in the fridge up to 2 days. Try unsweetened almond or soy milk for a dairy-free [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 10, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What foods protect the liver?
Some foods and drinks can help protect liver health. These include coffee, oatmeal, grapes, nuts, and fatty fish, among others. Learn more about the foods and drinks that are good for liver health here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Getting leptin levels 'just right' may provide cardiovascular protection
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Like that famous bowl of porridge, when leptin levels are 'just right' they help protect our cardiovascular health, scientists say.This satiety hormone, made primarily by fat cells, is best known for telling our brains we are full. In obesity, leptin levels are high but the brain becomes resistant to its message and the cardiovascular system instead comes under attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news