Imaging Utilization Patterns and Injury Characteristics Associated with Electric Standing Scooters in a Major Urban Area
Background: The recent proliferation of electric standing scooters in major urban areas of the United States has been accompanied by injuries of varying severity and nature, representing a growing public health concern. Objective: Our aim was to characterize imaging utilization patterns for injuries associated with electric scooter (e-scooter) use, including their initial emergency department (ED) management. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of the electronic medical record for all patients presenting to affiliated EDs for e-scooter –related injuries between July 2018 and April 2020. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 25, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Akash Bhatnagar, Maysoon Al-Hihi, Rehan Ali, Neil Sharma, Patrick Lai, Akarshan Monga, Shahram Hadidchi, Orest Kayder, Benedict Amalraj, Hamed Kordbacheh, Samuel Johnson, Hani Abujudeh, James H. Paxton, Nicholas Lewis Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Effectiveness and Safety of P2Y12 Inhibitors Pretreatment in Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Long Transfer Times
Early initiation of a new P2Y12 inhibitor in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients prior to primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is recommended over clopidogrel. However, comparative data remain limited, especially in semi-rural regions with subsequent longer transfer times. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 23, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vincent Roule, Idir Rebouh, Eric Roupie, Guillaume Malcor, Mathieu Bignon, Julien Trotel, Benoit Potier, Guillaume Lecoq, Xavier Arrot, Farzin Beygui Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Bilateral Hyphema - An Unexpected Complication of Exercise Resistance Band Use: A Case Report
Resistance bands commonly used for strength training exercise come with an unexpected risk for ocular trauma. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 23, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elizabeth Ford, R. Gentry Wilkerson Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

First-Dose Efficacy of Methylnaltrexone in Patients with Severe Medical Illness and Opioid-Induced Constipation: A Pooled Analysis
Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a frequent consequence of opioid analgesia that may increase patient risk for emergency department visits and hospitalization. Methylnaltrexone is a peripherally acting µ-opioid receptor antagonist indicated for the treatment of OIC. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: W. Frank Peacock, Neal E. Slatkin, Robert J. Israel, Nancy Stambler Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

A Retrospective Comparison of Intravenous Opioid Use for Abdominal Pain in the Emergency Department After Implementation of Order Set Restriction
This study was developed to provide insight into the effects of an i.v. opioid order set on prescribing of i.v. opioids in the emergency department (ED) for nontraumatic, unspecified abdominal pain. Research is needed in this area to catalyze more consistent and evidence-based i.v. opioid prescribing. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Emily Halsey, Donna Shuler Truoccolo Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Body Packing: Hiding in Plain Sight
A 31-year-old man was brought to the emergency department by airport customs officials for medical examination due to suspicion of concealed drugs in his body. He was conscious and oriented with a blood pressure of 124/80 mm Hg and a pulse rate of 80 beats/min. Respiratory and cardiovascular system examinations were normal. Abdomen was soft and nontender, but rectal examination revealed multiple pellet-like structures in the rectum. Blood and urine examinations for toxins were unremarkable. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vijeta Grewal, Anish Kapil Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Chronic Sore Throat Mandates Re-Thinking
A 69-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with sore throat for 6 months. She reported experiencing intermittent fever with productive cough and recent body weight loss. She had no dysphagia, shortness of breath, or night sweats. No history of recent travel or tuberculosis (TB) contacts were reported. She had a medical history of thymoma post excision 4 years ago. Her vital signs revealed temperature of 36.7 °C, heart rate of 123 beats/min, respiratory rate of 16 breaths/min, and blood pressure of 163/96 mm Hg. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shih-Chia Yang, Shih-Hao Lo, Chi-Wei Lee Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Letter to the Editor
Editor's Note: JEM does not typically retract articles that result in controversy of difference of opinion among authors and readers of the Journal. We support and encourage publication of legitimate, constructive scientific discourse. Case reports can only demonstrate possible associations and should be interpreted as such, however, it is important to report even potential associations in order to add to existing literature. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 6, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Response to “Bilateral Retinal Detachments in a Healthy 22-year-old Female Following Moderna SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination”
Dear Editor, (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 6, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nadeem Vaidya Source Type: research

Reply to Letter to the Editor
Editor's Note: JEM does not typically retract articles that result in controversy of difference of opinion among authors and readers of the journal. We support and encourage publication of legitimate, constructive scientific discourse. Case reports can only demonstrate possible associations and should be interpreted as such, however, it is important to report even potential associations in order to add to existing literature. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 5, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rachna Subramony, Amir Aminlari Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

They Also Serve Who Only Sit and Answer Covid-19 Hotline Telephones
In 2009, when I was 64, Paul McCartney's song, written when he was 16 (1), kept reverberating through my mind since I had a decision to make: recertify in emergency medicine (EM) or not. I thought about it a great deal. Initially I decided no, since I did not think I'd still be practicing at 73 or 74. There was also no need to be board certified in my hospital at the time. Then I thought, "You've always met the challenge head on. Why not go out the way you came in, not shirking a test? ” Having certified in 1989 and recertified in 1999, I successfully recertified in 2009. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 5, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Richard M. Ratzan Source Type: research

Response to Letter to the Editor: “Bilateral Retinal Detachments in a Healthy 22-year-old Female Following Moderna SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination”
As the authors of the manuscript “Bilateral Retinal Detachments in a Healthy 22-year-old Female Following Moderna SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination,” we would like to respond to the concerns of several retinal specialists including Chen et al. and Vaidya et al. who recently published letters-to-the-editor in your journal regarding our man uscript. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 5, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rachna Subramony, Amir Aminlari Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Response to “Bilateral Retinal Detachments in a Healthy 22-Year-Old Woman After Moderna SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination”R
Editor's Note: JEM does not typically retract articles that result in controversy of difference of opinion among authors and readers of the journal. We support and encourage publication of legitimate, constructive scientific discourse. Case reports can only demonstrate possible associations and should be interpreted as such, however, it is important to report even potential associations to add to existing literature. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 3, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Simon D. Chen, Chris Hodge Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Reply: Bilateral Retinal Detachments in a Healthy 22-year old Female Following Moderna SARS-CoV-2 Vaccination
Subramony et al reported a case of a 22-year old female with myopia who presented with bilateral retinal detachments 10 days following a second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine (1). They suggest that their case is unique and presents a possible correlation between the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine and the risk for retinal detachment. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 3, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Simon D Chen, Chris Hodge Source Type: research

Manual Palpation vs. Femoral Arterial Doppler Ultrasound for Comparison of Pulse Check Time During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in the Emergency Department: A Pilot Study
Few acute care providers consider pulse assessment in the critically ill patient a challenging skill. Evaluating for the presence or absence of a pulse with manual palpation (MP) is currently the gold standard taught by the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council guidelines (1,2). Minimizing interruptions to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including the time spent during pulse checks, increases compression fraction and improves survival outcomes (3 –8). However, utilizing MP for pulse assessment in an accurate and timely fashion is more complicated than it seems. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brad E. Schwartz, Priyanka Gandhi, Daniel Najafali, Melissa Meade Gregory, Nirmal Jacob, Travis Helberg, Celina Thomas, Bobbi-Jo Lowie, Maite A Huis in ’t Veld, Raul Cruz-Cano Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research