Debriefing a code: why bother and how to accomplish it in under ten minutes
For a long time as an attending, I was very uncomfortable with the idea of debriefing a code. Debriefing was not happening after every code. I felt awkward initiating the debriefing session and did not feel like I knew what I was doing. The clinical team never seemed excited about them. Overall, they just did not have the effect I was hoping for. At first I thought it was me, but then I noticed that this occurrence was not unique to me. It appeared that a lot of my colleagues shared the same discomfort that I did. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Frosso Adamakos Tags: Emergency Forum Source Type: research

Severely elevated intraocular pressure following traumatic asphyxia: a case report
Traumatic asphyxia is a syndrome caused by a sudden pressure rise in the chest caused by crushing injury of the thorax or upper abdomen. It is associated with a variety of thoracic injuries, neurological symptoms, and ocular complications. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Danny Epstein, Shadi Safuri, Sergiu Socea, Efrat Naaman, Yaron Bar-Lavie Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Massive ovarian cyst mimics constipation
Background: Abdominal pain and constipation are common presenting symptoms of pediatric patients presenting to the emergency department. Sometimes these symptoms are related to uncomplicated constipation from stool burden, and other cases may be secondary to more serious pathologies, including obstruction from intra- or extra-intestinal compression. Point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) can be helpful in discerning the etiology for this undifferentiated symptomatology. Case Report: A 14-year-old girl presented with 3 days of constipation and abdominal pain. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Katie Rong, Meghan Kelly Herbst Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

The ethics of procedural education under pandemic conditions
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic significantly disrupted emergency medicine residents ’ education. Early in the pandemic, many facilities lacked adequate personal protective equipment (PPE), and intubation was considered particularly high risk for transmission to physicians, leading hospitals to limit the number of individuals present during the procedure. This posed difficulties f or residents and academic faculty, as opportunities to perform endotracheal intubation during residency are limited, but patients with COVID-19 requiring intubation are unstable and have difficult airways. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua W. Joseph, Leslie A. Bilello, Alden M. Landry, Mary C. O'Brien, Kenneth D. Marshall Tags: Ethics in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Emergency Medicine Residency Does Not Reduce a Racial Minority-Based Test Performance Gap
Health care inequity is corrected more readily when safe, high-quality care is provided by physicians who reflect the gender, race, and ethnicity of patient communities. It is important to train and evaluate racially diverse physicians involved in residency training. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yvette Calderon, Michael S. Beeson, Mary M. Johnston, Kevin B. Joldersma, Earl J. Reisdorff Tags: Education Source Type: research

Analgesic Efficacy of Oral Aspirin/Ketamine Combination for Management of Acute Musculoskeletal Pain in the Emergency Department – A Proof of Concept Pilot Study
Musculoskeletal pain (MSK) affects one out of three adults and is the most common source of significant long-term pain, physical disability, and under-treatment in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ashley Davis, Catsim Fassassi, Daniel Dove, Jefferson Drapkin, Antonios Likourezos, Ankit Gohel, Patrizia Favale, Rukhsana Hossain, Mahlaqa Butt, Louis Gerges, Sergey Motov Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research

An Immaculate Deception: Persistently Elevated Serum β-Hcg in Metastatic Signet Ring Cell Gastric Adenocarcinoma
Persistent elevations in beta-human chorionic gonadotropin ( β-hCG) can be an ominous sign of both trophoblastic and non-trophoblastic malignancies. The absence of a clearly identified etiology of β-hCG elevation warrants pursuit of further diagnostic testing to determine the source of ectopic β-hCG. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 27, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Adam T. Hryniewicki, Andrew LaFree Tags: Clinical Communications: OB/GYN Source Type: research

Treatment of acute bronchitis and its impact on return emergency department visits
Antibiotics are not recommended in healthy, uncomplicated adults for the treatment of acute bronchitis, yet are still often prescribed. No randomized studies have examined whether prescribing antibiotics in the emergency department (ED) impacts hospital return rates. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 27, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexandria Taylor, Isabelle Zerfas, Christina Le, Frank D'Amico, F. Richard Heath, Megan Baumgartner Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Does Flexeril Work? Utility of Muscle Relaxants in Lower Back Pain
Lower back pain (LBP) has a staggering impact on the modern human condition. With a yearly prevalence estimated 20% to 40% and a lifetime prevalence of approximately 80% to 90%, almost everyone will at some point develop LBP (1 –6). Its high incidence, prevalence, and association with disability translate to high economic burden. Five percent of American workers will miss at least 1 day of work due to LBP, leading to 101.8 million lost workdays and $50 billion loss in productivity annually (7,8). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 15, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael O'Neal, Riham Alwan Tags: LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Source Type: research

Balancing Vision With Pragmatism: The Geriatric Emergency Department Guidelines-Realistic Expectations From Emergency Medicine and Geriatric Medicine
In 2014, the Geriatric Emergency Department (GED) Guidelines were published and endorsed by four major medical organizations. The multidisciplinary GED Guidelines characterized the complex needs of the older emergency department (ED) patient and current best practices, with the goal of promoting more cost-effective and patient-centered care. The recommendations are extensive and most EDs then and now have neither the resources nor the hospital administrative support to provide this additional service. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 15, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Richard D. Shih, Christopher R. Carpenter, Vaishal Tolia, Ellen F. Binder, Joseph G. Ouslander Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

The Epidemiology of Hand and Finger Lacerations in United States Emergency Departments
Hand and finger lacerations presenting to U.S. emergency departments (EDs) are common, although the burden of these injuries is not well understood. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 15, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexis B. Sandler, John P. Scanaliato, Sorana Raiciulescu, Leon J. Nesti, John C. Dunn Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Modified Shock Index as a Predictor for Mortality and Hospitalization Among Patients With Dementia
One in four older adults in the Emergency Department (ED) suffers from severe cognitive impairment, creating great difficulty for the emergency physicians who determine the urgency of their patients ’ condition, which informs decisions regarding discharge or hospitalization. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 15, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Re'em Sadeh, Sagi Shashar, Ela Shaer, Tzachi Slutsky, Iftach Sagy, Victor Novack, Vladimir Zeldetz Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Ultrasound-Guided Superior Laryngeal Nerve Block Facilitates Anesthesia Management in Bariatric Surgery
We described the successful completion of conscious endotracheal intubation with superior laryngeal nerve internal branch block (SLNi) in a patient with pathologic obesity. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 12, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jiehao Sun, Erjia Zhang, Xiaodan Chen, Wei Gao Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Artificial Intelligence in Emergency Medicine: Benefits, Risks, and Recommendations
Artificial intelligence (AI) can be described as the use of computers to perform tasks that formerly required human cognition. The American Medical Association prefers the term ‘augmented intelligence’ over ‘artificial intelligence’ to emphasize the assistive role of computers in enhancing physician skills as opposed to replacing them. The integration of AI into emergency medicine, and clinical practice at large, has increased in recent years, and that trend is lik ely to continue. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Laura Vearrier, Arthur R. Derse, Jesse B. Basford, Gregory Luke Larkin, John C. Moskop Tags: Computers in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Pandemic Pinna Injury
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed the worldwide use of surgical masks and respirators by health care workers and the public. Prolonged use of a mask is now common, with providers and members of the public wearing masks for upwards of 8 h. Prevalence of deleterious effects of mask use is considered very low, with the risk –benefit ratio favoring universal mask use. However, injury to the ear and pinna is a possible adverse effect of prolonged use and should be recognized by physicians and health care providers. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 9, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Juan Mark Rendon, Casey L. Jones, Walter L. Green Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research