SARS-CoV-2 positivity in ambulatory symptomatic patients is not associated with increased venous or arterial thrombotic events in the subsequent thirty days
COVID-19 has been associated with increased risk of thromboembolism in critically ill patients. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joby J. Thoppil, D. Mark Courtney, Samuel McDonald, Christopher Kabrhel, Kristen E. Nordenholz, Carlos A. Camargo, Jeffrey A. Kline Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Outcome After Thrombolysis in Patients With Intermediate High-Risk Pulmonary Embolism: A Propensity Score Analysis
The role of thrombolytic treatment in patients with intermediate high-risk pulmonary embolism (IHR-PE) remains controversial. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Luisa Zimmermann, Ulrich Laufs, Sirak Petros, Karsten Lenk Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Out-of-Hospital Intubation Success Rates Vary Based on Transport Environment
Oral endotracheal intubation is a procedure performed by emergency medical services (EMS) providers —who are stationed on ground ambulances, rotor-wing air ambulances (helicopter), and fixed-wing air ambulances (airplane)—for the purpose of securing a patient's airway. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aditya C. Shekhar, Ira Blumen Tags: Selected Topics: Prehospital Care Source Type: research

Trauma in a Patient with a Ventricular Assist Device
Dr. Kathryn Oskar: Today's case is that of a 31-year-old man who was brought into the Emergency Department (ED) by state police after a motor vehicle collision (MVC).  He was the restrained driver in a single-car collision into a guardrail. It is unclear how fast the driver was traveling, but the police reported airbag deployment. The patient was arrested by state police at the scene for operating under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicating substance an d was brought to the ED. He admitted to drinking vodka that night. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 13, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kathryn M. Oskar, Jonathan E. Slutzman, Kathleen Wittels, Susan R. Wilcox Tags: Case Presentations of the Harvard Emergency Medicine Residencies Source Type: research

Emergency Department Diagnosis of Postprocedural Hemorrhagic Cholecystitis Utilizing Point-of-Care Ultrasoun
Hemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of abdominal pain. Most often described in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma, anticoagulation use, coagulopathy (such as cirrhosis or renal failure), and malignancy (biliary angiosarcoma), this rare condition can be difficult to identify unless high on the differential. With point-of-care ultrasound becoming more commonplace in the emergency department (ED), this tool can be successfully used to make a timely diagnosis in the correct clinical context. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 12, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Garrett A. Cavaliere, Christine Kositz Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Hemodynamics in Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) Patients Undergoing Rapid Sequence Intubation With Etomidate or Ketamine
Rapid sequence intubation (RSI) is performed by helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) providers to establish airway control. Common induction agents are etomidate and ketamine, both touted to have relatively stable hemodynamic profiles. Limited data comparing these medications in the air medical setting exist. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 12, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Scott Kunkel, Timothy Lenz Tags: Selected Topics: Aeromedical Emergencies Source Type: research

Pubescent Girl With Urinary Retention
An 11-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with a 1-day history of urinary retention and abdominal pain. She denied dysuria, urinary frequency, hematuria, and trauma. She had never menstruated and reported a history of behavioral urinary-holding presented as bathroom avoidance to continue playing. Vital signs were normal and abdominal examination revealed suprapubic discomfort and distention. Bladder ultrasound (US) showed urinary retention. Urine (800 mL) was evacuated with a Foley catheter. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 12, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sabena Khan, Manu Madhok Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Emergency Department Management of Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients: Unique Immunologic and Hemodynamic Challenges
Since the first heart transplant in 1967, there has been significant progress in this field of cardiac transplantation. Approximately 600 pediatric heart transplants are performed every year worldwide. With the increasing number of pediatric heart transplant patients, and given the few tertiary care pediatric transplant centers, adult and pediatric emergency department (ED) providers are increasingly engaged in the care of pediatric heart transplant recipients in the ED. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aditi Gupta, Swati Sehgal, Neha Bansal Tags: Clinical Reviews Source Type: research

Bacteremia in Adults Admitted from the Emergency Department with Laboratory-Confirmed Respiratory Syncytial Virus
Collecting blood cultures from patients admitted from the emergency department (ED) with acute respiratory infection (ARI) is common, but the rate of secondary bacteremia in adult patients admitted from the ED with ARI associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is unknown. Indiscriminate collection of blood cultures can be associated with contaminated blood cultures and increased inappropriate antimicrobial use and health care costs. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ellen Sano, Betty Chang, William Sieling, Riley Jay, Alexandra Hill-Ricciuti, Matthew Phillips, Lyn Finelli, Lisa Saiman Tags: Clinical Laboratory in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Toxicity Due to Otilonium Bromide Overdose: A Case Report
Otilonium bromide is a quaternary ammonium compound commonly used in the management of irritable bowel syndrome. There are no previously published cases of overdose of otilonium bromide in humans. Due to its poor systemic absorption, it acts locally and has an excellent safety profile. Data from safety and postmarketing observation showed that otilonium bromide is well tolerated and that side effects do not differ significantly from those seen with placebo. The drug has proven to be practically toxicity free in animals and hence, assumed not to cause any specific problems in humans in case of overdose. (Source: The Journal...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Syed Ahmed Zaki, Mohamed Elmohamedy Helal, Asrar Rashid Tags: Selected Topics: Toxicology Source Type: research

‘Cortical Hand’ in the Emergency Department: Two Case Reports
Cortical hand strokes affect the ‘hand knob’ of the motor cortex, resulting in isolated distal upper limb or hand weakness. They are rare and can be easily misdiagnosed for peripheral lesions. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 10, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew L. Davies, Mark Harrison Tags: Selected Topics: Neurological Emergencies Source Type: research

Arterial Line Placement Pitfalls Can Be Demonstrated and Visualized With an Inexpensive, Wearable Trainer
Radial arterial line placement is commonly performed in various clinical settings, including the emergency department. However, learners are successful on the first attempt only half of the time. Simulation can provide learners with procedure practice opportunities outside of clinical practice to increase confidence and chances of success. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 10, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Olivia Paradis, Lauren Bitterman, Kimberly H. Park, Stacey Ernest, Amy Russell, Deena I. Bengiamin, Timothy P. Young Tags: Techniques and Procedures Source Type: research

Impact of Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric on Latinx Families' Perceptions of Child Safety and Health Care Access
Political rhetoric from the former U.S. president influences Latinx adults ’ feelings of safety and their decisions to seek care in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 8, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elodia Caballero, Raul Gutierrez, Eric Schmitt, Jannet Castenada, Natalie Torres-Cacho, Robert M. Rodriguez Tags: Public Health in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Alkaline Urine in the Emergency Department Predicts Nitrofurantoin Resistance
The Proteeae group (i.e., Proteus species, Morganella morganii, and Providencia species) frequently causes urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is generally resistant to nitrofurantoin. Proteeae species can produce urease, which can increase urine pH. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 6, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Johnathan M. Sheele, Claudia R. Libertin, Isaac Fink, Taylor Jensen, Nicole Dasalla, Timothy D. Lyon Tags: Clinical Laboratory in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Defying Occam's Razor: A Case of Pulmonary Embolism Masked By Cardiac Tamponade
Occam's razor instructs physicians to assume one single cause for multiple symptoms, whereas Hickam's dictum encourages them to suspect multiple concurrent pathologies. Although the general practice is to follow Occam's razor, occasionally Hickam's dictum reigns supreme. Here we present one such case, where the concurrent presence of two life-threatening pathologies posed clinical challenges in diagnosis and management. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 5, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vidya Pathak, Vijay Manivel Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research