Cardiac Tamponade and COVID-19 Vaccination: correspondence
Dear Editor, we would like to share ideas on the publication “Cardiac Tamponade After COVID-19 Vaccination [1].” Hryniewicki et al. concluded that “Although a direct causal link cannot be demonstrated, we present this case to increase awareness among emergency physicians of pericarditis as a rare, but potentially serious adverse event associated with CO VID-19 vaccination. [1].” We agree that the COVID-19 vaccine might induce some adverse event and cardiac tamponade is possible. However, the underlying patho-mechanism is unknown. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 6, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Pathum Sookaromdee, Viroj Wiwanitkit Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Use of an Asymptomatic COVID-19 Testing Protocol in a Pediatric Emergency Department
: High rates of asymptomatic infections with Coronavirus of 2019 (COVID-19) have been reported. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 6, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: James S. Ford, Evan C. Chua, Charankyla K. Sandhu, Beth Morris, Larissa S May, Stuart H. Cohen, James F. Holmes Source Type: research

Telemedicine Use by Older Adults in a COVID-19 Epicenter
In early 2020 New York City (NYC) was the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic in the US. Older adults were at especially high risk. Telemedicine (TM) was used to shift care from overburdened emergency departments (ED) to provide health care to a community in lock down. TM options presented unique challenges to our diverse older adult population including visual, hearing, cognitive and language limitations. Our objective was to evaluate the use of TM during the peak of the pandemic in NYC. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 6, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ellen Sano, Emily Benton, James Kenny, Erica Olsen, Anisa Heravian, Jimmy Truong Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Not Feeling Swell: SVC Syndrome Falsely Attributed to COVID-19 Vaccine Reaction
The mass immunization campaign against COVID 19 has resulted in more patients presenting to the Emergency Department with concern for a vaccine reaction. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 6, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bryan P. McNeilly, R. Gentry Wilkerson Tags: Adult Clinical Communications Source Type: research

A Beginner's Guide to Hospital Printer Maintenance
Physicians are expected to possess a wealth of scientific knowledge. Our training builds upon a foundation in chemistry, biology, and physics so as to understand the complexities of illness and master the tools to fight it. We kneel at the altar of science and technology in the belief that our patients will benefit from our supplication. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 6, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kevin McGurk Tags: Humanities and Medicine Source Type: research

The Prevalence and Characteristics of Non-Transports in a Provincial Emergency Medical Services System: A Population-Based Study
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provide patients with out-of-hospital care, but not all patients are transported to the hospital. Non-transport represents an often undefined yet potentially significant risk for poor clinical outcomes. Few North American studies have quantified this risk. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 4, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steven Carrigan, Judah Goldstein, Alix Carter, Yukiko Asada, Andrew Travers Tags: Selected Topics: Prehospital Care Source Type: research

A Prolonged QTc Interval Leads to the Diagnosis of Hyperthyroidism in an Adolescent Boy
Syncope is a common cause of pediatric emergency department visits and carries a broad differential diagnosis, which includes a few rare but critical cardiac conditions. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 4, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua Glasser, Cindy Chin, Ricardo A Samson, Brent J. Barber Tags: Clinical Communications: Pediatric Source Type: research

The Prevalence and Characteristics of Non-Transports in a Provincial Emergendy Medical Services System: A Population-Based Study
Emergency Medical Services (EMS) provide patients with out-of-hospital care, but not all patients are transported to the hospital. Non-transport represents an often undefined yet potentially significant risk for poor clinical outcomes. Few North American studies have quantified this risk. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 4, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steven Carrigan, Judah Goldstein, Alix Carter, Yukiko Asada, Andrew Travers Tags: Selected Topics: Prehospital Care Source Type: research

Reuse of Personal Protective Equipment: Results of a Human Factors Study Using Fluorescence to Identify Self-Contamination During Donning and Doffing
. At least  115,000 health and care workers (HCWs) are estimated to have lost their lives to COVID-19, according to the the chief of the World Health Organization (WHO). Personal protective equipment (PPE) is the first line of defense for HCWs against infectious diseases. At the height of the pandemic, P PE supplies became scarce, necessitating reuse, which increased the occupational COVID-19 risks to HCWs. Currently, there are few robust studies addressing PPE reuse and practice variability, leaving HCWs vulnerable to accidental contamination and harm. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 4, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Devin Doos, Paul Barach, Elisa Sarmiento, Rami Ahmed Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Effects of Sepsis Fluid Metric Compliance in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure, End-Stage Renal Disease, or Obesity
Existing concerns of precipitating fluid overload states in septic shock patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD), congestive heart failure (CHF), and obesity might impact compliance with fluid resuscitation guidelines. The recent article by Boccio et  al. certainly adds valuable information to the current literature (1). After carefully reviewing the article, we would like to share our comments. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dania Taylor, Jigar Patel, Ivan Berezowski, Ahmed Abdelmonem, Mariame Shaw Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

American Academy of Emergency Medicine
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Issue Highlights
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

(LEFT) Partial Contents; (RIGHT) Elsevier E-alert 1/2 pg vertical BW filler
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research