The Effect of Medical Scribes in Emergency Departments: A Systematic Review
Integrating medical scribes with clinicians has been suggested to improve access, quality of care, enhance patient/clinician satisfaction, and increase productivity revenue. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 16, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kristen Ullman, Lauren McKenzie, Bradley Bart, Glennon Park, Roderick MacDonald, Eric Linskens, Timothy J. Wilt Tags: Clinical Reviews Source Type: research

Why Did They Continue Playing? The Sinking Titanic as a Metaphor for the End of Life
Atlantic Ocean, 15 April 1912. 00:30 (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 16, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Luigi Riccioni Tags: Humanities and Medicine Source Type: research

A Model Oncologic Emergency Medicine Curriculum for Residency Training
Background Emergency medicine (EM) resident training in oncologic emergencies is limited, and significant gaps have been identified. Although 90% of emergency medicine residency program directors recognize the importance of residency training in oncologic emergencies, there is no standardized oncologic emergency curriculum. Objective We propose a focused oncologic EM curriculum that serves as a complement to existing EM didactics curriculums to prepare EM residents to recognize and manage the most common oncologic emergencies. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 16, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Monica K. Wattana, Demis N. Lipe, Christopher J. Coyne, Sarah Shafer, Patricia Brock, Kumar Alagappan Tags: Education Source Type: research

Association of Resident Shift Length with Procedural Complications
Training programs for resident physicians struggle to balance the need for clinical experience with the impact of fatigue on patient safety. The length of shifts worked by emergency medicine (EM) residents is likely an important determinant of resident fatigue. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: J. David Gatz, Daniel B. Gingold, Daniel L. Lemkin, R. Gentry Wilkerson Tags: Education Source Type: research

Herpes Simplex Virus-Associated Keratitis
A 58-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension presented to the Emergency Department (ED) with several weeks of right eye irritation, erythema, foreign-body sensation, and mild lid swelling. She gradually developed blurry vision and a watery discharge, which prompted her evaluation. She did not use corrective lenses and could not recall any trauma to the eye prior to symptom onset. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua E. Glick, Jonathan Bar Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Comparison of Suction Rates Between a Standard Yankauer, a Commercial Large-Bore Suction Device, and a Makeshift Large-Bore Suction Device
Commercial large-bore suction catheters and makeshift large-bore suction catheters with an endotracheal tube (ETT) attached to a meconium aspirator have been shown to have superior suction rates compared with a standard Yankauer. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dhimitri A. Nikolla, Briana King, Andrew Heslin, Jestin N. Carlson Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research

Severe Corneal Ectasia After Blunt Eye Trauma
We present an interesting case of ocular complications after minor blunt injury. We hope these images will help readers recognize this rare condition. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Benjamin Liotta, David Kuo, Theodore Chan Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Developing and Implementing a Geriatric Emergency Department (GED): Overview and Characteristics of GED Visits
Older adults account for a large and growing segment of the emergency department (ED) population (1,2). In 2017, there were more than 22 million ED visits among adults 65 years and older in the United States (3). The number of adults 65 years and older is expected to double to approximately 84 million by 2050, which will substantially increase the number of ED visits in this population (1,4). Older adults often present to the ED with atypical signs and symptoms of disease, multiple comorbidities, polypharmacy, geriatric syndromes (e.g., delirium, cognitive impairment, depression, and functional impairments), and social nee...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aladdin H. Shadyab, Edward M. Castillo, Theodore C. Chan, Vaishal M. Tolia Tags: Clinical Review Source Type: research

Iatrogenic Pulmonary Air Embolism with Rapid Resolution: A Case Report
Iatrogenic pulmonary air embolism is a fairly common and sometimes deadly complication of i.v. contrast injection. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Natassia Buckridge, Stacey Frisch, Richard Sinert Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Clinical Practice Statement: What is the Emergency Department Management of Patients with Angioedema Secondary to an ACE-Inhibitor?
Angioedema is a complication that has been reported in up to 1.0% of individuals taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is). Importantly, the onset of angioedema can occur anywhere from hours to several years after initiation of therapy with ACE-Is. Although most cases of ACE-I –induced angioedema (ACE-I-AE) are self-limiting, a major clinical concern is development of airway compromise, which can potentially require emergent airway management. The underlying pathophysiology of ACE-I-AE is incompletely understood, but is considered to be due in large part to excess brady kinin. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Steven Rosenbaum, R. Gentry Wilkerson, Michael E. Winters, Gary M. Vilke, Marie Yung Chen Wu Source Type: research

Child With Neck Lesion
A 10-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with swelling in the anterior part of her neck (Figure  1). The swelling had been present for 4 days and was increasing in size. The swelling was painful, and the pain was made worse with swallowing. The child had no fever and there had been no drainage from the skin. The patient's mother reported three similar episodes of neck swelling in the past. Th e patient had normal vital signs. On physical examination, she was found to have an approximately 3 × 4 cm anterior midline submental swelling that was erythematous, firm, tender to palpation, and moved ...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 14, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bergthor Jonsson, Manu Madhok Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Silently Suffering: A Pediatric Black Widow Spider Envenomation
We present a case of a 3-year-old boy who was brought to our emergency department because of sudden ear pain followed by labored breathing, abdominal pain, refusal or inability to speak, and grunting respirations. A black widow spider bite was suspected based on additional history obtained, and the spider was found in his helmet, confirming the diagnosis. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 13, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Eric R. Friedman, Stacey Seidel, Samantha Heiser, Katherine Prybys Tags: Selected Topics: Toxicology Source Type: research

Clostridium Perfringens Septic Arthritis of the Sternoclavicular Joint
We present the case of a 70-year-old patient with a history of stage IV colon cancer who presented to the emergency department with chest and neck pain for 3 days. After assessment, he was discharged home on analgesics. Within 24 h he returned, critically ill with C. perfringens septic arthritis of the left sternoclavicular joint and septic shock. Why Should an Emergency Physician Be Aware of This? Emergency physicians should be aware of the possibility of C. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ahmed I. Mohamed, Muhammed Elhady Muhammed Elgasim, Gerard Markey Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Ethnic Disparities in COVID-19 among Older Adults Presenting to the Geriatric Emergency Department
There is a dearth of epidemiological data on ethnic disparities among older COVID-19 patients. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 9, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aladdin H. Shadyab, Edward M. Castillo, Jesse J. Brennan, Theodore C. Chan, Vaishal M. Tolia Tags: Public Health in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Pneumothorax with bullous lesions as a late complication of COVID-19 pneumonia - a report on two clinical cases
Background: Coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) is mainly affecting the respiratory tract, causing viral pneumonia with fever, hypoxemia, and cough. Commonly observed complications include acute respiratory failure, liver or kidney injury, and cardiovascular or neurologic symptoms. In some patients, inflammatory damage results in long term complications like pulmonary fibrosis, chronic pulmonary thrombotic microangiopathy, or neurologic symptoms. The developement of spontaneous pneumothorax is reported as a rare complication mainly in consequence to mechanic ventilation in the criticall ill. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 9, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Martin Schiller, Andreas Wunsch, Juergen Fisahn, Andreas Gschwendtner, Ute Huebner, Wolfgang Kick Tags: Adults Clinical Communications Source Type: research

A Case Report You Can't Make Up: A Bladder Foreign Body
Relative to the overall number of foreign body cases that present to hospitals each year, the urinary bladder is an uncommon location (1,2). However, it is the most common site of foreign bodies in the urogenital tract, due to its distendable nature and small orifices, which make clearance of the foreign body difficult (1,3,4). Objects may be inserted into the bladder by several means, including: the intraurethral route; migration from another organ (such as an intrauterine device from the uterus); or through a traumatic, penetrating process (such as a bullet) (1,4,5). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Scott Winot, Andrew C. Hill, Erin L. Simon Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

An Uncommon Cause of Shock: Acute Thrombosis of the Inferior Vena Cava
We present a case of obstructive shock caused by placement of an inferior vena cava filter complicated by acute occlusion with extensive deep venous thrombosis. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elspeth K. Pearce Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Double Appendix: Implications for the Emergency Department
A double appendix, also known as vermiform appendix duplex, is a rare anomaly in humans, with a reported incidence of 1 in 25,000. The rarity of vermiform appendix duplication makes it a noteworthy medical occurrence. Approximately 100 reported cases have been documented since the first observed case in 1892. There are multiple types of appendiceal duplications, some of which include duplications of other organs. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matthew Tinkham, Marie Ziesat, John Straumanis, Samantha Heisler Tags: Clinical Communications: Pediatric Source Type: research

Point-of-Care Ultrasound Findings in a Case of Orbital Cellulitis: A Case Report
Ophthalmologic complaints are common in the emergency department. The utility of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) as an accessible, noninvasive modality to evaluate ocular pathology is of great value —particularly in settings where resources are limited or where ophthalmologic consultation may not be readily available. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gabrielle Beam, Ryan Check, Nick Denne, Joseph Minardi, Bradley End Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Type 1 Kounis syndrome induced by inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine
: Vaccination is the most important way to out of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Vaccination practices have started in different countries for community immunity. In this process, health authorities in different countries have preferred different type of COVID-19 vaccines. Inactivated COVID-19 vaccine is one of these options and has been administered to more than 7 million people in Turkey. Inactivated vaccines are generally considered safe. Kounis syndrome (KS) is a rare clinical condition which defined as the co-existence of acute coronary syndromes and allergic reactions. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: İbrahim Halil Özdemir, Bülent Özlek, Mehmet Burak Özen, Ramazan Gündüz, Özgür Bayturan Source Type: research

Babesiosis in the Emergency Department: A Case Report
Babesiosis, a tick-borne illness spread by Ixodes scapularis, is an emerging infectious disease in the Northeastern and upper Midwestern United States. Infection can present as a flu-like illness with anemia, thrombocytopenia, and jaundice. This disease can even be fatal in the immunocompromised or highly infected patient. Co-infection with other tick-borne illnesses is common, and prompt treatment with antiprotozoal agents and antibiotics is indicated to prevent adverse outcomes. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 13, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Taras Varshavsky, Darren Cuthbert, Renee Riggs Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Migratory Fish Bone Presented With Extensive Surgical Subcutaneous Emphysema: A Case Report
Fishbone ingestion represents a common cause for emergency department (ED) referral. In the majority of cases, an observed fishbone can be easily retrieved in the clinic setting. An impacted fishbone in the throat, albeit uncommon, carries potential risks of life-threatening events. Unusual complications caused by a migrated fishbone, including deep neck abscess, airway obstruction, and major vessels injury, are greatly influenced by the type of ingested fishbone and time between onset and presentation. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 13, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Athierah Muhammad, Geng Ju Tuang, Farah Dayana Zahedi, Nik Roslina Nik Hussin Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

Is a Lumbar Puncture Required to Rule Out Atraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Emergency Department Patients With Headache and Normal Brain Computed Tomography More Than Six Hours After Symptom Onset?
Atraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a deadly condition that most commonly presents as acute, severe headache. Controversy exists concerning evaluation of SAH based on the time from onset of symptoms, specifically if the headache occurred> 6  h prior to patient presentation. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael D. April, Samuel M. Keim, Alex Koyfman, William J. Meurer, Florian Schmitzberger, Brit Long Tags: Evidence-Based Medicine Source Type: research

Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in an Adult
Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children is a phenomenon that has emerged during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. There are, however, few reported cases of a similar disease in adults. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mary-Kate Amato, Christopher Hennessy, Kaushal Shah, Jeffrey Mayer Tags: Clinical Communications: Adult Source Type: research

They Don't Teach Us
It's 2014 and I'm on my first clinical rotation. I have one patient. And I have one job: control her blood sugar while her body is blasted with steroids, convinced to accept a new heart. “Hey, what's it mean if it says ‘expired’ where the room number was? I can't find the patient I've been following.”The fellow gives me a look. It is one of both pity and amusement.“Oh,” I say. The word hangs heavy and stale in the room. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marina Boushra Tags: Humanities and Medicine Source Type: research

A beriberi unhealthy latte: encephalopathy and shock from severe nutritional deficiency
We report the case of a middle-aged woman with extreme malnutrition caused by complications of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery who presented with signs and symptoms of severe thiamine deficiency and septic shock. Case Report: A 43-year-old woman who had undergone RYGB surgery and who had multiple complications presented to the emergency department with agitation, confusion, and lethargy. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 6, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Self, Jason Signorelli, Daniel Lasoff, Andrew Lafree, Christopher Coyne, Stephen R. Hayden, Gabriel Wardi Tags: Clinical Communications: Adults Source Type: research

Therapeutic Alternative to Transfusion in Nonpregnant Women With Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Uterine Blood Loss
We read with interest the article by Boone and colleagues about the management of nonpregnant women admitted to an emergency department (ED) with iron deficiency anemia (IDA) due to uterine bleeding (1). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ivo Beverina, Carlos Jeric ó, Manuel Quintana-Díaz, José Antonio García-Erce Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Response to Letter to the Editor “Therapeutic Alternative to Transfusion in Nonpregnant Women With Iron Deficiency Anemia Caused by Uterine Blood Loss”
We appreciate the letter from Beverina and colleagues in regard to our cohort study that examined current emergency physician practice patterns in the management of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) due to uterine blood loss in a U.S., tertiary-care, county hospital emergency department (ED) (1). As noted in our article, we acknowledge the important work being performed by that group in improving the management of IDA and agree with the need for providers to better incorporate patient blood management principles into a wide variety of practice settings (2,3). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen Boone, Jacquelyn M. Powers Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Expanding Pediatric Emergency Physician's Scope of Practice in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic
Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) reshaped the dynamics of medical care. Highly trained pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) physicians witnessed a drastic reduction of patient volumes due to regional lockdowns. Our emergency department was overflowing with adult critically ill patients. System adjustments became imperative to meet health care demands. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ameer Hassoun, Suzanne Pugh, Indira Merced, Manish Sharma Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

American Academy of Emergency Medicine
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Editorial Board
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Stephen R. Hayden, MD, University of California at San Diego (UCSD) (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Issue Highlights
The authors sought to determine if C-reactive protein  (CRP) and symptom duration could be used to improve the diagnosis of appendicitis compared to white blood cell count (WBC) and absolute neutrophil count (ANC). The diagnostic accuracy of WBC, ANC, and CRP were retrospectively compared for 539 patients with symptom duration less than or equal to 1 day compared to symptom duration for more than 1 day. While sensitivity and specificity of all the laboratory perimeters increased at>1 day of symptom duration, no laboratory test had adequate characteristics to be used alone to diagnose appendicitis in the popula...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Partial contents
□ Can Comprehensive Respiratory Pathogen Panels Be Used to Exclude Pertussis Infection? (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Instructions for Contributors
The Official Journal of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Clinical Effects of Balanced Crystalloids vs Saline in Adults with Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Intravenous fluid (IVF) administration is a key component in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Normal saline is currently the primary fluid recommended by clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of DKA; however, it has been shown to cause a hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis due to its high chloride concentration when compared to human plasma. Balanced crystalloid solutions, like Lactated Ringer ’s (LR) and Plasma-Lyte A (Baxter Inc), do not cause a metabolic acidosis as their chloride concentrations are similar to human plasma. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Hobensack, Nhan “Marc” Phan Tags: Abstracts Source Type: research

Impact of Perceived Inappropriate Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation on Emergency Clinicians ’ Intention to Leave the Job: Results From a Cross-Sectional Survey in 288 Centres Across 24 Countries
The rate of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) efforts in patients with high disease burden and frailty has been increasing since the early 2000 ’s despite the known poor 1-year functional recovery rate in these patients. These heroic measures have the potential to lead to not only increased emotional strain on patients and their families but also could lead to greater rates of burnout among emergency physicians and emergency department st aff. This international multi-center cross sectional survey was conducted to evaluate whether moral distress caused by the frequent perception of inappropriate resuscitation effor...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jacob Howard, Zachary B. Lewis Tags: Abstracts Source Type: research

First-Attempt Success Rate of Video Laryngoscopy in Small Infants (VISI): A Multicentre, Randomized Controlled Trial
This study evaluated first-attempt intubation success rate using direct laryngoscopy versus standard blade video laryngoscopy in small infants. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kenneth Brach Williams, Zachary B. Lewis Tags: Abstracts Source Type: research

Association of Timing of Electrocardiogram Acquisition After Return of Spontaneous Circulation With Coronary Angiography Findings in Patients With Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and electrocardiogram (ECG) is an important determinant of management after return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Immediate coronary angiography is recommended in patients whose ECG demonstrates ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI). Guidelines recommend acquiring an ECG as soon as possible after ROSC, however they do not specify the best time to do so. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vivian Diep, Nhan “Marc” Phan Tags: Abstracts Source Type: research

Enhancement in Performance of Septic Shock Prediction Using National Early Warning Score, Initial Triage Information, and Machine Learning Analysis
Several studies reported that the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) has shown superiority over other screening tools in discriminating emergency department (ED) patients who are likely to progress to septic shock. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hyoungju Yun, Jeong Ho Park, Dong Hyun Choi, Sang Do Shin, Myoung-jin Jang, Hyoun-Joong Kong, Suk Wha Kim Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Teaching Rapid Assessment Skills in Triage for the Emergency Medicine Clerkship
Rapidly assessing an undifferentiated patient and developing a gestalt for “sick vs. not sick” is a core component of emergency medicine (EM). Developing this skill requires clinical experience and pattern recognition, which can be difficult to attain during a typical EM clerkship. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Frances Rudolf, Leslie C. Oyama, Kristy Schwartz, Jorge A. Fernandez, Stephen R. Hayden Tags: Education Source Type: research

Mondor Disease in a Patient With Recurrent Deep Venous Thromboses
We present a case of Mondor disease in a man with a history of recurrent deep venous thromboses (DVTs). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephanie Cabral, Diane Kuhn, Sarah Dubbs Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Palm Bruising in Infants: A Recognizable Pattern of Abuse
Bruising in an infant is an important sentinel injury that should raise concern for child physical abuse, and should prompt a medical evaluation for occult injury. Hyperflexion during forceful squeezing of an infant's hand results in a distinct pattern of bruising along the palmar and interdigital creases, as well as the palmar eminences. Self-inflicted injury by the infant or injury resulting from benign handling should not be accepted as plausible explanations for this injury. The presence of concurrent occult injuries is common, and further supports concerns for abuse. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tagrid M. Ruiz-Maldonado, Katie L. Johnson, Jennifer L. Sabo, Lynn K. Sheets, Antoinette Laskey Tags: Violence: Recognition, Management and Prevention Source Type: research

Diagnostic Accuracy of Lung Point-Of-Care Ultrasonography for Acute Heart Failure Compared With Chest X-Ray Study Among Dyspneic Older Patients in the Emergency Department
Acute heart failure and exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are sometimes difficult to differentiate in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shunichiro Nakao, Christian Vaillancourt, Monica Taljaard, Marie-Joe Nemnom, Michael Y. Woo, Ian G. Stiell Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Emergency Presentations of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor-Related Endocrinopathies
Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) are an important component of anticancer treatment, with indications across an increasing range of oncological diagnoses. ICIs are associated with a range of immune-mediated toxicities. Immune-related endocrinopathies pose a distinct challenge, given the nonspecific symptom profile and potentially life-threatening sequelae if not recognized. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tom Knight, Tim Cooksley Tags: Selected Topics: Oncological Emergencies Source Type: research

Effect on Pain of an Oral Sucrose Solution vs. Placebo in Children 1 to 3  Months Old Needing Nasopharyngeal Aspiration: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Oral sweet solutions have been proposed as effective pain-reducing agents for procedures. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Serge Gouin, Laurence Alix-S éguin, Marie Pier Desjardins, Jocelyn Gravel, Denis Lebel, Nathalie Gaucher Tags: Brief Reports Source Type: research

Interaction Effect Between Prehospital Mechanical Chest Compression Device Use and Post –Cardiac Arrest Care on Clinical Outcomes After Out-Of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest
Prehospital application of a mechanical chest compression device (MCD) and post –cardiac arrest (PCA) care including coronary reperfusion therapy (CRT) or targeted temperature management (TTM) could affect the clinical outcome in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 28, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Eujene Jung, Ki Jeong Hong, Sang Do Shin, Young Sun Ro, Hyun Ho Ryu, Kyoung Jun Song, Jeong Ho Park, Tae Han Kim, Joo Jeong Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Personal Assessment of Ability to Drive Under the Influence of Alcohol vs. Objective Measurement
Alcohol intoxication often affects patient management in the emergency department. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 27, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Blake Bashor, Kelly Hay, Jill Stoltzfus, Holly Stankewicz Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor as a decision marker for early discharge of patients with COVID-19 symptoms in the emergency department
SARS-CoV-2 strains healthcare capacity. Better risk stratification, with discharge of patients with a predicted mild disease trajectory can ease this burden. Elevated blood soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) has previously been shown associated with risk of intubation in confirmed COVID-19 patients. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 25, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marius Ahm Stauning, Izzet Altintas, Thomas Kallemose, Jesper Eugen-Olsen, Mette Bendtz Lindstr øm, Line Jee Hartmann Rasmussen, Hejdi Gamst-Jensen, Jan O Nehlin, Ove Andersen, Jens Tingleff Source Type: research

Building Back Better: Applying Lessons from the COVID-19 Pandemic to Expand Critical Information Access
The COVID-19 pandemic generated an unprecedented volume of evolving clinical guidelines that strained existing clinical information systems and necessitated rapid innovation in Emergency Departments (EDs). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 25, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hope E.M. Schwartz, Nicholas R. Stark, Cathleen S. Sowa, Malini K. Singh, Christopher R. Peabody Source Type: research