Tramadol Use in United States Emergency Departments 2007-2018
Amidst the opioid epidemic, there has been an increasing focus on opioid utilization in U.S. emergency departments (EDs). Compared with other opioids, little is known about the use of tramadol over the past decade. Tramadol has uncertain efficacy and a concerning adverse effect profile compared with traditional opioids. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 31, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Peter M. Mullins, Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Ali Pourmand, Jeanmarie Perrone, Lewis S. Nelson, Jesse M. Pines Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Haloperidol Versus Ziprasidone With Concomitant Medications and Other Predictors of Physical Restraint Duration in the Emergency Department
Patients with severe agitation are frequently encountered in the emergency department (ED). At times, these patients are physically restrained and given calming medications; however, little is known about the effects of medications and other predictors on restraint duration. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Zlatan Coralic, Elizabeth S. Rader, David R. Vinson, Michael P. Wilson Tags: Selected Topics: Psychiatric Emergencies Source Type: research

Frequency of Opioid Prescription Filling After Discharge from the Pediatric Emergency Department
Little is known about prescription filling of pain medicine for children. In adult populations, race and insurance type are associated with differences in opioid prescription fill rate. We hypothesize that known disparities in pain management for children are exacerbated by the differential rates of opioid prescription filling between patients based on age and race. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 29, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Hrdy, Monika K. Goyal, Gia M. Badolato, Joanna S. Cohen Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

The Effect of Human Supervision on an Electronic Implementation of the Canadian Triage Acuity Scale (CTAS)
Most electronic emergency department (ED) triage systems allow nurses to modify computer-generated triage scores. It is currently unclear how this affects triage validity. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 28, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seth Davis, Chelsey Ju, Philippe Marchandise, Magueye Diagne, Lars Grant Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Use of Person-Centered Language Among Scientific Research Focused on Sickle Cell Disease
Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a lifelong illness affecting many individuals in the United States. Proper management of SCD is imperative, however, the unpredictability of pain crises may lead to frequent emergency department (ED) visits. This SCD feature has led to health-related stigmatization via labels and other terminology within clinical settings, which may be translated through medical research. Thus, it is important for medical literature to adhere to person-centered language (PCL) to diminish such stigmas from transcending into the clinical setting. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 25, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Emily Sowah, Paul Delgado, M. Tomi Adewumi, Mary C. Greenough, Swapnil Gajjar, Jabraan Pasha, Savannah Nicks, Micah Hartwell Tags: Original Contributions Source Type: research

Ultrasound-Guided vs. Landmark Method for Subclavian Vein Catheterization in an Academic Emergency Department
Ultrasound guidance has been shown to decrease complication rates and improve success for internal jugular and femoral vein catheterization in the emergency department (ED). However, the current data on the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided subclavian vein catheterization has failed to provide support for similar conclusions. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 18, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rachna Subramony, Rachel Spann, Anthony Medak, Colleen Campbell Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Provider-Referred Versus Self-Referred Emergency Department Visit After Urgent Care Center Visit
Urgent care centers (UCCs) provide an alternative to emergency departments (EDs) for low-acuity acute care, as they are convenient with shorter wait time, but little is known about the quality of care at UCCs. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 16, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ka Ming Ngai, Nicole Lazarciuc, Lynne D. Richardson Tags: Administration of Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Pharmacy Calls for Prescription Clarification at an Academic Emergency Department
Approximately two-thirds of patients discharged from an emergency department (ED) are prescribed at least one medication. Prescription clarification by outpatient pharmacies for ED patients can lead to delays for patients and added workload. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 13, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher J. Edwards, Vivienne Ng, Nicholas B. Hurst, Juan Contreras, Farshad Mazda Shirazi Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Efficacy of Combination Haloperidol, Lorazepam, and Diphenhydramine vs. Combination Haloperidol and Lorazepam in the Treatment of Acute Agitation: A Multicenter Retrospective Cohort Study
Antipsychotic and sedative combinations are commonly used for treating agitation in the emergency department despite limited evidence regarding their comparative safety and efficacy. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Trevor Jeffers, Brenna Darling, Christopher Edwards, Nina Vadiei Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Women and Diagnostic Imaging: Time for Common Sense and Equity
Women presenting to emergency departments (EDs) are frequently in need of radiologic imaging tests. Yet there is marked variability in the way in which radiology departments address female patients who need to undergo emergent diagnostic imaging. There are differences in the definitions of childbearing age, the requirement for a negative pregnancy test before various radiology studies, and the informed consent process for patients known to be pregnant. These variations can defy common sense and contribute to inequity for female and pregnant patients in the ED in the form of delays while waiting for unnecessary pregnancy te...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joelle Borhart Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Pediatric Musculoskeletal Radiographs: Anatomy and Fractures Prone to Diagnostic Error Among Emergency Physicians
Pediatric musculoskeletal (pMSK) radiograph interpretations are common, but the specific radiograph features at risk of incorrect diagnosis are relatively unknown. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Winny Li, Jennifer Stimec, Mark Camp, Martin Pusic, Joshua Herman, Kathy Boutis Tags: Selected Topics: Emergency Radiology Source Type: research

“Women and Diagnostic Imaging: Time for Common Sense and Equity”
Women presenting to emergency departments (ED) are frequently in need of radiologic imaging tests.  Yet there is marked variability in the way in which the radiology departments address female patients who need to undergo emergent diagnostic imaging. There are differences in the definitions of "childbearing age," the requirement for a negative pregnancy test before various radiology studies, a nd the informed consent process for patients known to be pregnant. These variations can defy common sense and contribute to inequity for female and pregnant patients in the ED in the form of delays waiting for unnecessary pregnanc...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 11, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joelle Borhart Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Comparison of Commercial Versus Homemade Models for Teaching Ultrasound-Guided Peripheral I.V. Placement
Various commercially available and do-it-yourself (DIY) models are used to teach emergency medicine (EM) residents and medical students ultrasound (US)-guided i.v. insertion. Expensive commercial models degrade over time, but DIY models are inexpensive, easily prepared, and readily discarded. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karima Sajadi, Leslie Crosby, Melissa Yu, James Longenbach, Kevin Conor Welch, Maxwell Cooper Tags: Education Source Type: research

Atraumatic Bilateral Renal Subcapsular Urinomas in a Young, Healthy Female
Urinomas are rare and generally result from trauma to any part of the urinary collecting system. Appropriate imaging is crucial in the timely diagnosis and management of urinomas and for ruling out other etiologies such as subcapsular renal hematomas and perinephric abscesses. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lucia Christiana Lin, Jennifer Stone, Sukhdeep Singh, Tung-Chin Hsieh, Rachna Subramony Tags: Clinical Communications: Adults Source Type: research

Point-of-care ultrasound utilized for foreign body in a toe: A case report of botfly  larvae
Myiasis, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is infection with fly larvae commonly occurring in tropical and subtropical areas. Whereas the presentation of skin infection with organisms such as Dermatobia hominis (human botfly) is more easily recognized in these regions, identification of myiasis in the United States is difficult due to its rarity. Due to unspecific signs and symptoms, myiasis may initially be mistaken for other conditions, like cellulitis. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 8, 2022 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Megumi T. Mori, Claire L. Paulson, Marna Rayl Greenberg, Kevin R. Roth Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research