Prehospital High-Flow Nasal Oxygen Therapy on COVID-19 Patients: An Additional Waiting Time
We read with great interest the case report by Kedzierewicz et  al. (1) about the use of high-flow nasal oxygen (HFNO) therapy in the prehospital setting and its logistical constraints. It is legitimate to want to initiate effective in-hospital therapies earlier in the patient's care; thus, the desire to use prehospital HFNO therapy on Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients in respiratory distress appears logical indeed. Nevertheless, an additional non-negligible constraint on the use of HFNO therapy in the prehospital setting that was not mentioned by the authors is the time needed to heat and humidify gas to the t...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicolas Cazes, Aur élien Renard, Hélène Marsaa, Pascal Menot Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Intranasal Fentanyl and Midazolam Use in Children 3 Years of Age and Younger in the Emergency Department
Although the efficacy and safety profiles of both intranasal fentanyl and midazolam are well studied in pediatric patients, few studies examine their use in younger children. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jonathan G. Chang, Rebecca B. Regen, Rahul Peravali, Sarah S. Harlan, Matthew P. Smeltzer, Rudy J. Kink Tags: Pharmacology in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

American Academy of Emergency Medicine
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Contents
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

(LEFT) Partial Contents; (RIGHT) Elsevier E-alert 1/2 pg vertical BW filler
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Instructions for Authors
(Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

A Case of a Lethal Diquat Ingestion in a Toddler
Diquat is an herbicide that may cause rapid and profound systemic toxicity. It can cause multisystem organ failure, primarily via its effects on the gastrointestinal, renal, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems. Case fatality rates as high as 43% have been reported. There is a paucity of pediatric literature on diquat poisoning, and in this article, we will discuss an unfortunate pediatric case that highlights the severity of diquat toxicity. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 23, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Manette Ness-Cochinwala, Juan Sebastian Proa ño, Jeffery N. Bernstein, Paul Martinez, Hugh Ladd, Balagangadhar Totapally Tags: Selected Topics: Toxicology Source Type: research

Diagnosing Achilles Tendon Rupture with Ultrasound in Patients Treated Surgically: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury with increasing incidence due to the rising popularity of high-velocity sports, continued physical activity of the aging American population, and use of fluoroquinolones and steroid injections. The diagnosis can often be missed or delayed, with up to 20% misdiagnosed, most commonly as an ankle sprain. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 17, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amir Aminlari, Jennifer Stone, Ryan McKee, Rachna Subramony, Adam Nadolski, Vaishal Tolia, Stephen R. Hayden Tags: Ultrasound in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

A Case for Thrombectomy: Acute Onset Hemiparesis from a Large Vessel Occlusion
We describe a case of an elderly man with an acute stroke secondary to LVO and present images demonstrating the use of mechanical thrombectomy. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rahul V. Nene, Arvin R. Wali, David R. Santiago-Dieppa, Shanmukha Srinivas, Kama Z Guluma Tags: Visual Diagnosis in Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Takotsubo rather than Kounis syndrome complicating SARS-CoV-2 vaccination
Letter to the Editor (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: J. Finsterer Source Type: research

Incidence, clinical characteristics, risk factors and outcomes of acute coronary syndrome in patients with Covid-19: Results of the UMC-19-S10
There is a lack of knowledge about the real incidence of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in patients with COVID-19, their clinical characteristics and prognosis. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 2, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aitor Alqu ézar-Arbé, Òscar Miró, Juan González del Castillo, Sònia Jiménez, Pere Llorens, Alfonso Martín, Francisco Javier Martín-Sánchez, Eric Jorge García-Lamberechts, Pascual Piñera, Javier Jacob, Juan Miguel Marín Porrino, Blas Jiménez, Source Type: research

In Memoriam
It is with great sadness that I wish to inform readers of The Journal of Emergency Medicine that longtime member of the editorial staff, Marty Martell, recently passed away. Marty was well known to editors and reviewers of JEM. She was an integral part of the JEM family for longer than I can remember. She started with the Journal when Peter Rosen, our founding editor, came to San Diego, back in 1989. Back in those days, all journal operations were by hand and snail mail. Marty would actually receive paper manuscripts, photocopy them, assign them to reviewers and associate editors, mail them out, and track their reviews. (S...
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen R. Hayden Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Perineural Dexamethasone as a Peripheral Nerve Block Adjuvant in the Emergency Department: A Case Series
Acute pain is one of the most common complaints encountered in the emergency department (ED). Single-injection peripheral nerve blocks are a safe and effective pain management tool when performed in the ED. Dexamethasone has been explored as an adjuvant to prolong duration of analgesia from peripheral nerve blocks in peri- and postoperative settings; however, data surrounding the use of dexamethasone for ED-performed nerve blocks are lacking. (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicole M. Duggan, Arun Nagdev, Bryan D. Hayes, Hamid Shokoohi, Lauren A. Selame, Andrew S. Liteplo, Andrew J. Goldsmith Tags: Clinical Communications: Adults Source Type: research

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Still Controversial
We would like to thank you for giving us the opportunity to respond to the concerns raised in Hu 's letter and also to thank Hu for showing the interest in our article (1). (Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The Journal of Emergency Medicine - November 1, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sangsoo Han, Young Soon Cho Tags: Reply to Letter to the Editor Source Type: research