George Niederehe, Ph.D.: Tribute and Thanks.
Authors: Evans JD, Lisanby SH, Gordon J PMID: 30737007 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Influence of positive and negative dimensions of dementia caregiving on caregiver well-being and satisfaction with life: Findings from the IDEAL study
There is an increasing recognition, in both policy and practice, of the need for better support for informal caregivers of people with dementia.1,2 Understanding the factors that can influence the well-being of caregivers is important for the development of effective support. Caregiving can be both a rewarding and a stressful experience, yet caregiving research has tended to focus on the negative outcomes of caregiving. It is well recognized that caregiving can have a detrimental impact on caregivers ’ health and well-being;3 however, caregivers can also experience positive aspects of providing care, which may have a...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Catherine Quinn, Sharon M. Nelis, Anthony Martyr, Christina Victor, Robin G. Morris, Linda Clare, IDEAL study team Source Type: research

Precisely-measured hydration status correlates with hippocampal volume in healthy older adults
Dehydration is a well-known cause of reversible cognitive impairment in older people, especially those with pre-existing cognitive deficits. The standard practice is to treat any confused older person arriving in an emergency room with intravenous fluid. Typically, these patients are seen to “perk right up” and are quickly discharged. Surprisingly, this near universal clinical practice has motivated few mechanistic studies, and it remains uncertain why cognition in older people is so sensitive to hydration status. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Tracy Butler, Anup Deshpande, Patrick Harvey, Yi Li, Henry Rusinek, Elizabeth Pirraglia, Ricardo S Osorio, Lidia Glodzik, Guillaume Madelin, Wen W. Yu, John Masaeka, Dympna Gallagher, Mony J. de Leon Source Type: research

Influence of Positive and Negative Dimensions of Dementia Caregiving onCaregiver Well-Being and SatisfactionWith Life: Findings From theIDEAL Study
There is an increasing recognition, in both policy and practice, of the need for better support for informal caregivers of people with dementia.1,2 Understanding the factors that can influence the well-being of caregivers is important for the development of effective support. Caregiving can be both a rewarding and a stressful experience, yet caregiving research has tended to focus on the negative outcomes of caregiving. It is well recognized that caregiving can have a detrimental impact on caregivers ’ health and well-being;3 however, caregivers can also experience positive aspects of providing care, which may have a...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Catherine Quinn, Sharon M. Nelis, Anthony Martyr, Christina Victor, Robin G. Morris, Linda Clare, IDEAL study team Tags: Regular Research Article Source Type: research

The roles of apathy and depression in predicting Alzheimer's disease: a longitudinal analysis in older adults with mild cognitive impairment.
Apathy and depression are two of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and often co-occur with one another. Though apathy can occur in the context of depression, it can also occur independently and is often under-diagnosed and under-treated (1). Apathy differs from depression. Though some patients demonstrate loss of motivation or pleasure, depression is characterized by low mood and negative cognitions such as guilt, hopelessness or suicidal ideation (2). (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 7, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Myuri Ruthirakuhan, Nathan Herrmann, Danielle Vieira, Damien Gallagher, Krista L. Lanct ôt Tags: Regular Research Articles Source Type: research

Applying Rigor: Intervention Studies for Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia
Researchers in the Netherlands have long been innovators in nonpharmacologic and service-based interventions for older adults. The GRIP intervention by Appelhof et al1 featured in this issue of AJGP is laudable. It targets the growing population of individuals with young-onset dementia (YOD) in facilities. However, despite strengths including a multidisciplinary team-based approach, a person-centered intervention that considered resident preferences, and a stepped-wedge study design, GRIP did not have any significant impact on behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) or psychotropic medication use. (Source:...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 7, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Amanda N. Leggett, Helen C. Kales Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

The Roles of Apathy and Depression in Predicting Alzheimer Disease: A Longitudinal Analysis in Older Adults With Mild Cognitive Impairment
Apathy and depression are two of the most common neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and often co-occur with one another. Although apathy can occur in the context of depression, it can also occur independently and is often underdiagnosed and undertreated.1 Apathy differs from depression. Although some patients demonstrate loss of motivation or pleasure, depression is characterized by low mood and negative cognitions such as guilt, hopelessness, or suicidal ideation. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 7, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Myuri Ruthirakuhan, Nathan Herrmann, Danielle Vieira, Damien Gallagher, Krista L. Lanct ôt Tags: Regular Research Article Source Type: research

International Perspectives on Old Age Psychiatry Training.
This article describes the psychiatry of old age specialist training programs in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. These training programs have varying durations, ranging from 1 to 3 years. Although it may not be a mandatory requirement to complete a psychiatry of old age clinical rotation, psychiatry of old age experience and competencies are expected during general psychiatry training. There is generally a lack of opportunity to learn about other clinical specialties relevant to older adults, such as geriatric medicine and neurology. Finally, much work is needed to better coordinate psychiatry of ol...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Extent and Predictors of Potentially Inappropriate Antidepressant Use among Older Adults with Dementia and Major Depressive Disorder
Approximately 5.5 million older adults (age ≥ 65 years) in the United States (US) suffer from dementia.1 Compromised quality of life (QoL) with dementia is common, which is due to progressive memory impairment as well as several co-occurring physical and mental chronic conditions. Depression is one of the most common psychiatric conditions affecting older adults with dementia.2 Concurrent depression may lead to a wide array of negative outcomes among individuals with dementia, such as early cognitive decline, low medication adherence, increased functional disabilities, high rates of nursing home placement, and increased...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 6, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Sandipan Bhattacharjee, Jeannie K. Lee, Asad E. Patanwala, Nina Vadiei, Daniel C. Malone, Shannon M. Knapp, Wei-Hsuan Lo-Ciganic, William J. Burke Tags: Regular Research Articles Source Type: research

Physicians are less likely to assess and manage suicide risk among older adults: broader implications for suicide prevention within primary care
The study by Simons et al1 in this issue conducted retrospective EHR reviews of 93 veterans from three hospitals to identify age differences in suicide risk screening and management in their last medical visit before making a suicide attempt. We know from prior studies that of those dying by suicide, up to 45% will have visited their primary care provider within a month before their death, while only 20% will have seen a mental health professional2. The current study adds to this literature by examining age group differences in clinicians ’ assessment of specific risk factors and their provision of crisis interventio...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 4, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Patrick J. Raue Source Type: research

Ten-Year Prevalence of Cognitive Impairment Diagnoses and Associated Medical and Psychiatric Conditions in a National Cohort of Older Female Veterans.
CONCLUSION: Few studies have characterized the prevalence of cognitive impairment in female veterans despite the expected increases in CI and impending demographic shifts in the military. The high prevalence of medical and psychiatric conditions in female veterans with CI highlights their healthcare burden and emphasizes the need for further investigations into the prevention, treatment, and care of cognitive impairment in this understudied population. PMID: 30704839 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 3, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Chronology
Time defines us –all the way from thatrandom delivered date of birth,through the demanding daily tick-tock,till the tall pendulum stops swingingand the numbers are, at last, engravedin ornamental stone.Time defies us –despite all our wishful effortsto slow down or even stopthe relentless moving sidewalk,step to one side for just a moment,look back and look ahead, take stock,maybe even change direction.Time delights us –when every once in a long whiletime disappears, just vanishes whileone is making things, things like music,meals, a baby, or fresh fashioned prayer,even a poem, perhaps, that can echostil l...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 2, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Tags: Poem Source Type: research

Mild Behavioral Impairment as a Marker of Cognitive Decline in Cognitively Normal Older Adults
Dementia, the most common cause of which is Alzheimer's disease (AD), affects an estimated 45 million people and is a leading cause of morbidity and death; it has devastating impact on people with the disease and those caring for them and costs the world economy around US $818 billion per year.1 Developing new and more effective treatments for AD is an urgent priority however there have been no new licensed pharmacologic therapies for 15 years.2 As such there is an increasing realization of the need for improved markers of early identification of people with pre-clinical AD, and their translation into effective stratificat...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 2, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Byron Creese, Helen Brooker, Zahinoor Ismail, Keith A Wesnes, Adam Hampshire, Zunera Khan, Maria Megalogeni, Anne Corbett, Dag Aarsland, Clive Ballard Tags: Regular Research Articles Source Type: research

Exercise and Cognitive Training as a Strategy to Improve Neurocognitive Outcomes in Heart Failure: a pilot study
Mild to moderate cognitive impairment (MCI) is estimated to occur in 25% to 50% of stable chronic heart failure (HF) patients and is associated with adverse clinical outcomes, poor quality of life and higher mortality.1 Heart failure negatively impacts function in most cognitive domains.2,3 Memory loss, the most common cognitive deficit in HF, is particularly challenging because of its negative impact on the individual's capacity to participate in essential self-care activities such as managing complex medication regimens and adhering to dietary restrictions. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - February 1, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Rebecca A Gary, Sudeshna Paul, Elizabeth Corwin, Brittany Butts, Andrew H. Miller, Kenneth Hepburn, Bryan Williams, Drenna Waldrop-Valverde Tags: Regular Research Articles Source Type: research

Measuring and Intervening to Instill Purpose in Life for Older Adults to Prevent Cognitive Decline
In this issue of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, Giyeon Kim and colleagues1 employ secondary data analyses of longitudinal data from the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS) to determine the association of a constructed scale which assesses purpose in life (PIL) with cognitive outcomes, a clever use of a large and readily available data set. They find that persons with one standard deviation above the mean on the purpose in life scale score nearly one point higher on an overall assessment of cognitive function determined by a composite scale ranging from 0 to 35. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 30, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Dan Blazer Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Health-Promoting Strategies for the Aging Brain.
We present the evidence for conditions and risk factors that may contribute to cognitive decline and dementia and for interventions that may mitigate their impact on cognitive functioning later in life, or even prevent them and their cognitive sequelae from developing. Although much work remains to be done to meet the challenges of the aging brain, strategies to promote its health have been demonstrated and offer much promise, which can only be realized if we mount a vigorous public health effort to implement these strategies. PMID: 30686664 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 29, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Promoting Health Behaviors For Aging Persons.
Authors: Alexopoulos GS PMID: 30679021 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Improving everyday functioning in the old-old with a working memory training.
Working memory (WM), or the ability to maintain and simultaneously process information for use in a complex task, is a crucial human cognitive mechanism. It is essential to everyday life functioning, but clearly undergoes a linear decline with aging [1]. Procedures to improve WM performance, along with any effects on untrained tasks (transfer effects) have thus been the focus of various studies conducted in the last ten years. Though still debated, there is now a body of evidence in the aging literature to support the effectiveness of WM training procedures in producing specific gains in WM tasks similar to those used in t...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 28, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Erika Borella, Alessandra Cantarella, Barbara Carretti, Annalisa De Lucia, Rossana De Beni Tags: Regular Research Articles Source Type: research

Improving Everyday Functioning in the Old-Old with Working Memory Training
Working memory (WM), or the ability to maintain and simultaneously process information for use in a complex task, is a crucial human cognitive mechanism. It is essential to everyday life functioning, but clearly undergoes a linear decline with aging.1 Procedures to improve WM performance, along with any effects on untrained tasks (transfer effects), have thus been the focus of various studies conducted in the last 10years. Although still debated, there is now a body of evidence in the aging literature to support the effectiveness of WM training procedures in producing specific gains in WM tasks similar to those used in the...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 28, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Erika Borella, Alessandra Cantarella, Barbara Carretti, Annalisa De Lucia, Rossana De Beni Tags: Regular Research Article Source Type: research

Perspectives: Measuring the Impact of Articles Published in The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018
With this perspective, the editorial leadership of The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (AJGP), in consultation with the managing editor at Stellar Medical Publications (David Newcombe) and publisher at Elsevier (Josh Spieler), is initiating a new annual feature, reporting measures of impact for articles published during each 12-month period (July 1 to June 30), the so-called “medical year.” Our goal is to extend previous bibliometric analyses demonstrating domains of science published in the AJGP and attracting the greatest number of citations by examining not only number of citations (used in the calc...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 26, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Charles F. Reynolds, Stephan Arndt, Dan G. Blazer, Jordan Karp, Helen Lavretsky, Gwenn Smith, David Steffens, Ipsit Vahia Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Measuring the Impact of Articles Published in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry: July 1, 2017-June 30, 2018
With this perspective, the editorial leadership of the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry (AJGP), in consultation with the managing editor at Stellarmed (David Newcombe) and publisher at Elsevier (Josh Spieler), is initiating a new annual feature, reporting measures of impact for articles coming out during each 12-months period (July 1-June 30), the “medical year.” Our goal is to review the conventionally accepted bibliometric analyses demonstrating the domains of geriatric mental health science published in the AJGP and attracting the greatest number of citations (used in the calculation of impact factor...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 26, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Charles F. Reynolds, Stephan Arndt, Dan G. Blazer, Jordan F. Karp, Helen Lavretsky, Gwenn Smith, David Steffens, Ipsit Vahia Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Age Differences in Suicide Risk Screening and Management prior to Suicide Attempts
Contacts with healthcare providers in the immediate days or weeks leading to a suicide attempt or death represent missed opportunities to reduce patients ’ suicide risk. Prior studies, including a systematic review, have found middle aged and older adults make visits to general medical providers more often than younger adults before suicide.1,2 However, when compared to age-matched controls, older adults who die by suicide are not more likely to se e their primary care providers in the month before death, suggesting that primary care visits are not a specific marker of suicide risk. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 22, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Kelsey Simons, Kimberly Van Orden, Kenneth R. Conner, Courtney Bagge Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Advice on how to choose a geriatric psychiatry fellowship
The population of older adults with mental health and substance use disorders in the United States is increasing at a significant rate. This growth creates a critical need for trained geriatric psychiatrists. Unfortunately, the number of psychiatrists choosing to receive subspecialty training in geriatric psychiatry has not kept pace with the growing needs of society. Many different methods to enhance the recruitment of physicians interested subspecialty training are being discussed nationally. One way to improve recruitment is to provide prospective residents a clear understanding of the process by which one may apply to ...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 21, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Rajesh R. Tampi, Kristina F. Zdanys, Shilpa Srinivasan, Brandon C. Yarns Source Type: research

Pride and prejudice in the treatment of depression and anxiety in acutely ill older adults
It is a truth universally acknowledged1 regarding geriatric mental health, that while depression and anxiety disorders are uncommon in healthy elders,2,3 they frequently affect acutely ill older adults – especially those with functional impairment.4 Simning et al drive this point home in this issue of AJGP, observing a high burden of depression and anxiety in settings of medically ill, functionally impaired older adults. They report that the prevalence of clinically significant depressive and an xiety symptoms are 39% and 24%, respectively, in older adults who had received rehabilitation services in inpatient rehabil...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 21, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Eric J. Lenze, Michael S. Avidan Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Reliably Assessing Language Function in Dementia in the 21st Century
Dr. Verma is an Associate Medical Director at PAREXEL, a contract research organization. PAREXEL were not involved at any stage in the writing or review of this article. “The limits of my language mean the limits of my world.” ― Ludwig Wittgenstein (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 21, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Mohit Verma Source Type: research

Late-Life Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Following Rehabilitation Services in Medicare Beneficiaries.
CONCLUSION: Older adults who receive rehabilitation services are at risk of having depressive and anxiety symptoms after these services have terminated. As mental illness is associated with considerable morbidity and may affect rehabilitation outcomes, additional efforts to identify and treat depression and anxiety in these older adults may be warranted. PMID: 30655031 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Why Do They Just Sit? Apathy as a Core Symptom of Alzheimer Disease.
CONCLUSION: Apathy, but not depression, was significantly associated with worse function, with the strongest effects in mild dementia. Results emphasize the need for separate assessments of apathy and depression in the evaluation and treatment of patients with dementia. Understanding their independent effects on function will help identify patients who may benefit from more targeted management strategies. PMID: 30655032 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Purpose in Life Protects Against Cognitive Decline among Older Adults
Life expectancy and the proportion of the population aged older than 65 continue to increase (1). Examining positive psychological factors that may help protect against poor health and promote positive well-being has been an area of increased focus. The research reported here focuses on a particular aspect of positive well-being: purpose in life. Purpose in life is typically conceptualized as intentions, goals, and sense of direction that derive meaning from life's experiences (2,3). Historically, this construct originated from humanistic psychology and writings of Dr. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 18, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Giyeon Kim, Su Hyun Shin, Monica A. Scicolone, Patricia Parmelee Source Type: research

Technology, Communication, Mood, and Aging: An Emerging Picture.
Authors: Vahia IV PMID: 30642649 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Evaluation of Technology-Based Interventions for Informal Caregivers of Patients With Dementia-A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.
CONCLUSION: Technology-based interventions have the potential to support informal caregivers of PWD. Because of advantages such as high flexibility and availability, technology-based interventions provide a promising alternative compared with "traditional services," e.g., those for people living in rural areas. More high-quality RCTs for specific caregiver groups are needed. PMID: 30642650 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Immigration: A Modifier of Dementia Risk in Old Age?
Authors: Albert SM PMID: 30642651 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Opioid Use Disorder and Its Treatment Among Older Adults: An Invited Commentary
Although nonmedical and illicit use of opioids disproportionately occurs among young and middle-aged adults, opioid use disorder (OUD) and related consequences among older adults merit more attention, as highlighted by Joshi et al.1 in their article. Medications for addiction treatment (MAT), including methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone, are considered a cornerstone for treating OUD. Yet, MAT is underutilized because of stigma (e.g., toward persons with OUD and/or MAT itself) and structural barriers (e.g., limited insurance coverage and lack of providers), among other reasons. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Patience Moyo Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Katharine Hepburn: Markings and Remembrances
In the Journal's ongoing series, “Images in Aging,”, I am pleased to remember and to celebrate the life and work of Katharine Hepburn. My favorite of her four Oscar-winning films, On Golden Pond (1981), is a deeply moving, at times funny, and always compassionate portrayal of the journey into dementia taken by her husband, play ed by Henry Fonda, in the role of a Penn professor of engineering who is caught up in denial and, finally, terrified by losing his way home. Hepburn conveys the grief and love felt by a compassionate care giver, and the inestimable importance of having a companion in this long journey in...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Charles F. Reynolds Tags: Images in Aging Source Type: research

Opioid Use Disorder and its Treatment among Older Adults: An Invited Commentary on Joshi et al. (2019)
Although non-medical and illicit use of opioids disproportionately occur among young and middle-aged adults, opioid use disorder (OUD) and related consequences among older adults merit more attention as highlighted by Joshi et al. in their article.1 Medications for addiction treatment (MAT), including methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone, are considered a cornerstone for treating OUD. Yet, MAT is underutilized due to stigma (e.g., toward persons with OUD, and MAT), and structural barriers (e.g., limited insurance coverage, and lack of providers) among other reasons. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Patience Moyo Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Exercise for depression: a feasibility trial exploring neural mechanisms
Exercise has emerged as an effective non-pharmacological treatment for depression in older and younger adults 1. The neural benefits of exercise overlap with several regional structural brain abnormalities in depression (i.e., prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, and hippocampus) 2. Only one study (N=41) has examined structural brain changes associated with exercise in depression and did not find changes in hippocampal volume; however, poor intervention adherence (mean=30%) limits interpretation of these findings 3. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 17, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Swathi Gujral, Howard Aizenstein, Charles F. Reynolds, Meryl A. Butters, George Grove, Jordan F. Karp, Kirk I Erickson Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Increasing Social Activities Reduces Depression in Old Age, but Which Activities Matter?
The study by Solomonov et al.1 in this issue of the Journal describes a small sample but delivers a fascinating result. Forty-eight older adults with major depression, but not impaired cognition, received nine sessions of the streamlined “Engage” psychotherapy. Alexopoulos and Arean2 developed Engage to facilitate exposure to emotionally rewarding experiences under the hypothesis that depressive disorders are either the cause or the result of a cycle of living without satisfying rewards. Restoring rewards should reduce depressio n. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 16, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Gary J. Kennedy Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Increasing social activities reduces depression in old age; but which activities matter?
The study by Solomonov et al (1) in this issue of the journal describes a small sample but delivers a fascinating result. Forty-eight older adults with major depression but not impaired cognition received nine sessions of the streamlined “Engage” psychotherapy. Alexopoulos and Arean (2) developed Engage to facilitate exposure to emotionally rewarding experiences under the hypothesis that depressive disorders are either the cause or the result of a cycle of living without satisfying rewards. Restoring rewards should reduce depres sion. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 16, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Gary J. Kennedy Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Commentary on “Accelerated DNA Methylation Aging in U.S. Military Veterans: Results From the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study”
Research stemming from the ongoing military activities of the United States has yielded new insights regarding the impact of war and combat and military life in general. Adverse effects of war, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, brain injury, and physical traumas, may make people “age faster,” as reflected in physical appearance and in health problems typically associated with older age.1–3 Genome-wide DNA methylation provides the measure of Δage, which quantifies accelerated DNA aging and can predict adverse health outcomes. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 15, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: David Mischoulon Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Commentary on: Accelerated DNA Methylation Aging in U.S. Military Veterans: Results from the National Health and Resilience in Veterans Study
Dr Mischoulon has received research support from Nordic Naturals. He has provided unpaid consulting for Pharmavite LLC and Gnosis USA, Inc. He has received honoraria for speaking from the Massachusetts General Hospital Psychiatry Academy, Blackmores, and PeerPoint Medical Education Institute, LLC. He has received royalties from Lippincott Williams& Wilkins for published book “Natural Medications for Psychiatric Disorders: Considering the Alternatives.” (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 15, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: David Mischoulon, Joyce R. Tedlow Tags: Invited Perspective Source Type: research

Two Interventions for PatientsWith Major Depression and Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Impact on Quality of Life.
CONCLUSION: Maintaining quality of life is a favorable outcome in depressed patients with COPD whose course is one of deterioration. These findings highlight the usefulness of PID-C, an easy to learn, personalized adherence enhancement intervention that, after further testing, may be integrated into the rehabilitation and care of depressed COPD patients. PMID: 30630702 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Corrigendum to 'Does Cognition Predict Treatment Response and Remission in Psychotherapy for Late-Life Depression?' [The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 23 (2015) 215-219].
Authors: Beaudreau SA, Rideaux T, O'Hara R, Arean P PMID: 30622002 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry Tags: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

Information for Subscribers
(Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

In This Issue
(Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Source Type: research

The Ladies Who Know
It's not a club you want to join.The dues are too damned high.But after you've buried your husbandThe ladies who know begin to appear.One brings you a book of meditations.They helped her then and they help her now.Others, widowed forever, take you to dinner.They tell you their stories,These ladies you barely know.They tell you their storiesThey listen to yours as long as you need to tell them.There are worse things than dying in your bedOn a Sunday morning full of plans.There are worse things than dying in your bedThere are worse things than dying . (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Nancy R. Davison Tags: Poem Source Type: research

Grocery List
We used to buy bags of potatoes and onionsHalf gallon of milk and a six pack of beer.Pork tenderloin, steaks by the dozenLettuce, tomatoes, zucchini and squashesTo cook in the eveningWe, two, togetherWith wine and cloth napkins, one squatty candle.Now I go to the market, just when I have toA potato, one onion, a box of orange tea.Six eggs, a small steak and one single pork chopAll in the fridge, the pantry, the freezer,In case I get hungryBut mostly, I don't.Cooking for one is its own kind of torment. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Nancy R. Davison Tags: Poem Source Type: research

The Ladies Who Know or the Last Wives Club
It's not a club you want to join.The dues are too damned high.But after you've buried your husbandThe ladies who know begin to appear.One brings you a book of meditations.They helped her then and they help her now.Others, widowed forever, take you to dinner.They tell you their stories, these ladies you barely know.They tell you their storiesThey listen to yours as long as you need to tell them.There are worse things than dying in your bed on a Sunday morning full of plans.There are worse things than dying in your bedThere are worse things than dying …Slowly, you become one of the ladies who know. (Source: The Americ...
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Nancy R. Davison Tags: Poem Source Type: research

Autobiography
Poetry is a new form of expression for me. My subject is aging and loss – a way to sort out my new life after the death of my husband of forty-eight years. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Nancy R. Davison Tags: Editorial Source Type: research

Author's Note
Poetry is a new form of expression for me. My subject is aging and loss —a way to sort out my new life after the death of my husband of 48years. I have always written—journals, book reviews, art catalogs, sermons, prayers, and short stories about old ladies even before I was one. My November novel (NaNoWriMo, or National November Writing Month, requires 50,000 words between midnight November 1 and midnight November 30), Annie Belle's Memory, is about a woman with Alzheimer's who tells her stories to her invisible friend from childhood. (Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)
Source: The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry - January 11, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Nancy R. Davison Tags: Poem Source Type: research