Priapism in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)
Thromboembolic complications related to SARS-CoV-2 have been extensively reported. They include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, ischemic stroke, and acute coronary syndrome. Penile thrombosis has not been reported as a thrombotic complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection with hypercoagulability.Here we describe a case of priapism as a thromboembolic complication in a patient with COVID-19 who recovered from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms mainly related to an hypercoagulability state. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Myriam Lamamri, Ala Chebbi, Jordan Mamane, Sofia Abbad, Milena Munuzzolini, Florence Sarfati, St éphane Legriel Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Priapism in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19): A case report
Thromboembolic complications related to SARS-CoV-2 have been extensively reported. They include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, ischemic stroke, and acute coronary syndrome. Penile thrombosis has not been reported as a thrombotic complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection with hypercoagulability.Here we describe a case of priapism as a thromboembolic complication in a patient with COVID-19 who recovered from acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms mainly related to an hypercoagulability state. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Myriam Lamamri, Ala Chebbi, Jordan Mamane, Sofia Abbad, Milena Munuzzolini, Florence Sarfati, St éphane Legriel Source Type: research

Application of termination of resuscitation rules during the COVID-19 pandemic by emergency medical service
The COVID-19 pandemic is placing unprecedented burdens on the healthcare system in some parts of the United States, one of which is the infection and quarantining of healthcare workers. Emergency medical service (EMS) providers are at a greater risk of contracting COVID-19 due to their proximity to critically ill patients while performing life-saving medical interventions, such as cardiac resuscitation. EMS providers in New York City (NYC) have been especially vulnerable, as approximately 20% of their emergency medicine technicians (EMTs), paramedics, and supervisors have been out of work in early April due to illness with...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Francis O'Connell, Peter Sweetser, Theodore Quan, M.D. Ali Pourmand Source Type: research

The authors ’ response: Propofol and sedation in patients with coronavirus disease 2019
We would like to thank you for your valuable comments on our manuscript. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mitsuhito So, Toru Hifumi, Shutaro Isokawa, Masato Shimizu, Norio Otani, Shinichi Ishimatsu Source Type: research

Propofol and sedation in patients with coronavirus disease
Currently, coronavirus disease (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has become a pandemic. I read the interesting article “Neuroleptic malignant syndrome in patients with COVID-19” recently published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine [1]. Intravenous anesthetic propofol has been widely used for sedation in intensive care units. This case report described continuous infusions of propofol for the sedation of patients with COVID-19. The exact amount of propofol, which is administered by bolus followed by continuous infusion, was not described in this report ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ju-Tae Sohn Source Type: research

Risk stratification of patients with atrial fibrillation in the emergency department
Early and accurate risk stratification of Atrial fibrillation (AF) patients in the Emergency Department (ED) could aid the physician in determining a timely treatment strategy appropriate to the severity of disease. We conducted a retrospective review of 243 adult patients who presented to a tertiary ED with AF in 2017. Primary outcome studied was 30-day adverse event (a composite outcome of repeat visit to the ED, cardiovascular complications, and all-cause mortality).Secondary outcome studied was 90-day all-cause mortality. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chloe F.C. Yeo, HuiHua Li, Zhi Xiong Koh, Nan Liu, Marcus E.H. Ong Source Type: research

Identifying low-risk chest pain in the emergency department: Obstructive coronary artery disease and major adverse cardiac events
Accurate risk stratification for obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and major cardiac adverse events (MACE) is important in emergency departments. We compared six established chest pain risk scores (the HEART score, CAD basic model, CAD clinical model, TIMI, GRACE, uDF) for prediction of obstructive CAD and MACE. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yo Sep Shin, Shin Ahn, Youn-Jung Kim, Seung Mok Ryoo, Chang Hwan Sohn, Dong Woo Seo, Won Young Kim Source Type: research

SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and emergency medicine: The worst is yet to come
Emergency departments are available 24/7 to provide health care. Emergency medicine is a stressful work, with a time pressure that is an intrinsic characteristic of the job, focusing on breadth of acute care [1,2]. Furthermore, the lack of bed spaces, the increase of admissions without any increase of staff can induce burn-out symptoms for emergency physicians and their early departure for other specialties [3,4]. Since the end of 2019, a new Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) responsible to the CoronaVirus Disease (COVID-19) was discovered in the city of Wuhan, Hubei, China [5]. (Source: The Amer...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jean-Baptiste Bouillon-Minois, Jeannot Schmidt, Fr édéric Dutheil Source Type: research

Reliability of the visio-vestibular examination for concussion among providers in a pediatric emergency department
Visio-vestibular examination (VVE) deficits are common following pediatric concussion. Guidelines recommend assessing these deficits on all potentially concussed youth given their diagnostic and prognostic value, however test psychometrics of the VVE in the emergency department (ED) setting are unknown. Our objective was to determine the inter-rater (IRR) and test-retest reliability (TRR) of the VVE in a pediatric ED. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel J. Corwin, Kristy B. Arbogast, Casey Swann, Rebecca Haber, Matthew F. Grady, Christina L. Master Source Type: research

Sepsis alerts called in the field vs the ED: impact of severity and in-hospital confounders
We read with great interest the paper published by Mixon et al. [1], who reported that sepsis alerts called in the field via emergency medical services (EMS) decrease time to antibiotics and increase the likelihood of antibiotic administration occurring within 60 min of arrival, when compared to sepsis alert called in the emergency department (ED), but don ’t affect strong outcomes including mortality, in hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Romain Jouffroy, Beno ît Vivien Source Type: research

Prehospital oxygen for stroke victims
It was of great interest to read Dr. Dylla and colleagues' well-done retrospective cohort study investigating prehospital oxygen treatment in acute stroke patients [1]. It was also very informative to read Dr. Zhang's review [2] and the authors' response [3]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: John Collins, Michael Sumner, Mehwish Barlas, Pamela Ohman Strickland, Jonathan McCoy Source Type: research

Comment on the published paper entitled Predictors of Early Death in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Akg üllü Ç et al.
We wish to comment on the published paper entitled Predictors of Early Death in Patients with Acute Pulmonary Embolism by Akg üllü Ç et al. [1]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David Garrido, Esteban Visarrea Source Type: research

Sepsis alerts called in emergency department versus in the field via emergency medical services: do not forget that severity and in-hospital cofounders influence outcomes!
We read with great interest the paper published by Mixon et al. [1], who reported that sepsis alerts called in the field via emergency medical services (EMS) decrease time to antibiotics and increase the likelihood of antibiotic administration occurring within 60 min of arrival, when compared to sepsis alert called in the emergency department (ED), but don ’t affect strong outcomes including mortality, in hospital and intensive care unit length of stay. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Romain Jouffroy Source Type: research

Covid19 and the power of the state during a pandemic
On March 6, 2020, the State of Pennsylvania, where I live, declared a public health emergency in light of the Covid19 pandemic [1]. In so doing, the Governor activated broad powers to respond to the public health crisis. During a declared disaster, the Governor may suspend regulations, control the ingress and egress (entry and exit) of people, seize property, control the movements of the population and utilize the police to make arrests [2]. Such powers are expansive and designed to respond to public health crises and disasters. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Darren P. Mareiniss Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Effect of opioid analgesics on emergency department length of stay among low back pain patients in the United States
The objective of this study was to compare emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) between patients treated with opioid analgesia versus non-opioid analgesia for low back pain (LBP) in the ED. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seth W. Anderson, Sandipan Bhattacharjee, Asad E. Patanwala Source Type: research

Emergency Severity Index as a predictor of in-hospital mortality in suspected sepsis patients in the emergency department
To demonstrate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the Emergency Severity Index (ESI), quick Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA), Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) criteria, and National Early Warning Score (NEWS) for predicting in-hospital mortality and intensive care unit (ICU) admission in suspected sepsis patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Pariwat Phungoen, Sukanya Khemtong, Korakot Apiratwarakul, Kamonwan Lenghong, Praew Kotruchin Source Type: research

COVID-19 in health care workers – A systematic review and meta-analysis
It is essential to know the proportion of health care workers (HCW) who are COVID 19 positive, as well as the severity and mortality among them. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ankit Kumar Sahu, V.T. Amrithanand, Roshan Mathew, Praveen Aggarwal, Jamshed Nayer, Sanjeev Bhoi Source Type: research

Vehicle related injury patterns during the COVID-19 pandemic: What has changed?
Following the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, normal daily life in the United States (US) has changed dramatically. As the US population shifts to practice social distancing, there are undoubtedly changes in the pattern of traumatic injuries presenting to Emergency Departments across the US. This analysis aims to analyze previously undocumented trends on how the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the pattern of vehicle related injuries in selected US states. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mason Sutherland, Mark McKenney, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

Toxic shock-like syndrome and COVID-19: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)
Early reports of COVID-19 in pediatric populations emphasized a mild course of disease with severe cases disproportionately affecting infant and comorbid pediatric patients. After the peak of the epidemic in New York City, in late April to early May, cases of severe illness associated with COVID-19 were reported among mostly previously healthy children ages 5-19. Many of these cases feature a toxic shock-like syndrome or Kawasaki-like syndrome in the setting of SARS-CoV-2 positive diagnostic testing and the CDC has termed this presentation Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome (MIS-C). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrea G. Greene, Mona Saleh, Eric Roseman, Richard Sinert Source Type: research

Ultrasound-guided transgluteal sciatic nerve analgesia for refractory back pain in the ED
Sciatic radicular back pain is a painful condition resulting in approximately 2% of emergency department (ED) visits a year. Typically, the ED treatment has been limited to various analgesic regimens with limited success sometimes resulting in hospital admissions for pain control. Regional anesthesia has become increasing popular for lower-limb analgesia, but has not universally permeated the ED setting. The transgluteal sciatic nerve block (TGSNB) is a procedure that can provide effective analgesia for lower extremity pain. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew J. Goldsmith, Andrew Liteplo, Bryan D. Hayes, Nicole Duggan, Calvin Huang, Hamid Shokoohi Source Type: research

Videoconferencing in the emergency medical dispatch center: A pilot study
Everywhere in the European Union, citizens can dial 112 to reach the emergency services, number available free of charge and available 24/7. Obtaining accurate information from a 112 caller is pivotal to dispatch appropriate resource and live video footage from scene may aid. In a recent study, Ter Avest et al. found that video helps to provide more information from the scene, and that the use of mobile phone video was readily accepted [1]. In France, EMS dispatch centers are organized with a front-line office who handles and gathers information on the call, and then transfers it to an EMS physician who analyzes the call. ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gwenol é Pineau, Yann Penverne, Morgane Péré, Joël Jenvrin, Emmanuel Montassier, Arnaud Martinage Source Type: research

COVID-19: The end of a story through the eyes of an emergency practitioner
Almost three billion humans are confined, which makes a lot of people. Almost all countries seem to be affected by this viral threat. And at this time, there are only two ways to deal with it. Either we isolate affected individuals from the rest of the population until they are well, or we have the rest of the population confined until the threat passes. Ideally, a combination of the two options works best. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sa ïd Jidane, Lahcen Belyamani Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Ketamine for emergency sedation of agitated patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis” [Am. J. Emerg. Med. 2019]
The authors regret that an error was included in the section titled Statistical Analysis and Quantitative Synthesis. In this section, a paragraph was mistakenly inserted from a different unrelated paper. The correct section should read: (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Natalie Sullivan, Chen Chen, Rebecca Siegel, Yan Ma, Ali Pourmand, Nataly Montano, Andrew Meltzer Source Type: research

Ultrasound-guided transgluteal sciatic nerve analgesia for refractory back pain in the ED: A case series
Sciatic radicular back pain is a painful condition resulting in approximately 2% of emergency department (ED) visits a year. Typically, the ED treatment has been limited to various analgesic regimens with limited success sometimes resulting in hospital admissions for pain control. Regional anesthesia has become increasing popular for lower-limb analgesia, but has not universally permeated the ED setting. The transgluteal sciatic nerve block (TGSNB) is a procedure that can provide effective analgesia for lower extremity pain. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew J. Goldsmith, Andrew Liteplo, Bryan D. Hayes, Nicole Duggan, Calvin Huang, Hamid Shokoohi Source Type: research

Theophylline toxicity: Successful management of a patient with distributive shock secondary to drug overdose
Presenting a case of acute theophylline and salbutamol overdose with distributive shock. Twenty one years old lady presented with history of consumption of 3  g of theophylline and 40 mg of salbutamol. On admission she had altered sensorium with the systolic blood pressure of 60 mmHg, unrecordable diastolic blood pressure and heart rate of 147/min. Investigations revealed severe metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, hypocalcemia which was managed by int ravenous fluids, vasopressors, infusion of injection calcium gluconate and injection potassium chloride. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: V.P. Chandrasekaran, Anand Parthasarathy, Balaji Muruga, Senthamil, Tharanesh Source Type: research

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emergency department visits and patient safety in the United States
This study aims to investigate the effects of COVID-19 on ED visits, and possible reasons for changes. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brad Boserup, Mark McKenney, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

Critical procedure performance in pediatric patients: Results from a national emergency medicine group
We sought to examine the frequency of pediatric critical procedures performed in a national group of emergency physicians. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jestin N. Carlson, Mark Zocchi, Coburn Allen, T. Kent Denmark, Jay D. Fisher, Matthew Wilkinson, Katherine Remick, Abbie Sullivan, Jesse M. Pines, Arvind Venkat, US Acute Care Solutions Research Group Source Type: research

Dermatologic manifestations and complications of COVID-19
The novel coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While much of the focus has been on the cardiac and pulmonary complications, there are several important dermatologic components that clinicians must be aware of. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Gottlieb, Brit Long Source Type: research

Cryptococcal meningitis in an immunocompetent patient
Cryptococcal meningitis is a fungal infection that is most commonly thought of as an opportunistic infection affecting immunocompromised patients, classically patients with Human Immunodeficiency (HIV) infection. It is associated with a variety of complications including disseminated disease as well as neurologic complications including intracranial hypertension, cerebral infarcts, vision loss and other neurologic deficits. It is diagnosed by lumbar puncture with CSF studies, including fungal culture and cryptococcal antigen testing. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Laura S. Murphy, Aaron J. Lacy, Austin T. Smith, Karan S. Shah Source Type: research

Newly diagnosed diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis precipitated by COVID-19 infection
We report a case of an individual without prior history of diabetes presenting in diabetic ketoacidosis after being diagnosed with COVID-19 one week prior. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ashley I. Heaney, Gregory D. Griffin, Erin L. Simon Source Type: research

Opportunities and challenges of traditional Chinese medicine going abroad for COVID-19 treatment
We appreciate the work that Kai Zhang has done to highlight the treatment of COVID-19 in China via the use of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) [1]. COVID-19 initially occurred in China at the end of December 2019 [2]. The Chinese government began to build many shelter hospitals in Hubei Province to treat patients with COVID-19, and medical workers from all over the country rushed to Wuhan to provide assistance [3]. Among the medical staff supporting Hubei Province, there were more than 4500 members of China's TCM system. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Xiao-qing Huang, Meng-Yun Zhou, Yong-ran Cheng, Lan Ye, Ming-Wei Wang, Juan Chen, Li-jun Zhao, Zhan-hui Feng Source Type: research

Emergency medicine program director perception and processes for consultant abuse of residents -results of a national survey
Although investigators have described patient abuse of residents, there is a paucity of research examining the issue of consultant abuse towards physicians-in-training [1-6]. We evaluated emergency medicine residency program director's (PD) perception of consultant abuse targeted towards residents and the processes in place to confront alleged perpetrators. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jessica Lopez, Mark Huber, Thomas McLaughlin, Alainya Tomanec, K. Tom Xu, Anne Messman, Peter Richman Source Type: research

Toxic shock-like syndrome and COVID-19: A case report of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C)
The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused a total of nearly 300,000 deaths worldwide [1]. SARS-CoV-2-positive pediatric compared to adult patients differ presenting with pharyngeal erythema with 40% either asymptomatic or had URI symptoms [2]. A recent systematic review article on COVID-19 reports a low pediatric prevalence [3]. On May 14, the CDC released a Health Advisory on a severe life-threatening complication of pediatric COVID-19 termed Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) [4]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrea G. Greene, Mona Saleh, Eric Roseman, Richard Sinert Source Type: research

Influence of age and gender on arrival of patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction to tertiary centers during COVID-19 pandemic. Experience of Madrid, Spain, STEMI network (Codigo Infarto Madrid)
During COVID-19 pandemic, health care systems have suffered a tremendous impact, due to the huge number of patients needing hospitalization. This has led to more restrictive indications for invasive procedures and to defer elective procedures [1], contributing to a reduction on the activity at catheterization laboratories. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ra úl Moreno, Joaquín J. Alonso, Rafael Caballero, Ervigio del Corral, Jaime Elízaga, Roberto Martin Asenjo, Manuel Jiménez Mena, Fernando Alfonso, Antonio Fernández-Ortiz, Francisco Javier Goicolea, Javier Botas, Felipe Navarro, Eduardo Alegría-Bar Source Type: research

Potential role of telemedicine in solving ST-segment elevation dilemmas in remote areas during the COVID-19 pandemic
A recent report showed that ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) may be the first clinical manifestation in COVID-19 patients, with no culprit lesions identifiable in approximately 40% of patients [1]. This could pose a problem in remote areas, especially water-locked areas, in which referral should be considered wisely. The authors are currently based in Indonesia, an archipelago spanning over 17 thousand islands, with challenges due to its geography and uneven distribution of health workers. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Raymond Pranata, Alexander Edo Tondas, Ian Huang, Michael Anthonius Lim, Bambang Budi Siswanto, Markus Meyer, Veselin Mitrovic Source Type: research

The authors reply: Ozone therapy's efficacy and complications
We have read the correspondence written by Bonetti and Travagli carefully. First of all, we would like to thank the authors for reading our case report [1]. We appreciate the authors and the physicians who were applying ozone therapy. Also, we referred to some of the studies in the literature that show ozone therapy's efficacy. The authors mentioned that the term “massive” might not be appropriate. Of course, we know “massive” term means in medical language. We evaluate the patient with her history, physical examination, laboratory, and imaging studies for diagnosis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bu ğra İlhan, Halil Doğan Source Type: research

Infected subgaleal hematoma in a 4-month-old girl
Subgaleal hematoma is an uncommon, but potential sequela of birth trauma and instrument-assisted delivery of neonates, as well as head trauma in young children. A rare complication is an infection of the subgaleal hematoma, which typically happens due to concomitant scalp lacerations. Escherichia coli is the most common causative pathogen in peripartum cases, and Staphylococcus aureus predominates in trauma cases. An even more rare complication is infection of the hematoma with intact overlying skin, the proposed mechanism of action of which is a hematogenous spread of the bacteria. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shafee Salloum, Wesley Sit, Mollie M. Walton, Kambiz Kamian Source Type: research

Gaseous ozone or method of administration: Hunt for the culprit
İlhan and Doğan present an article about a subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum case, as a complication of intradiscal ozone application for the treatment of cervical discopathy [1]. As members of committees of ozone therapy scientific societies we consider it necessary to clarify some asp ects, starting with the title. In medical language, the term emphysema means presence of air or other gas in the body's tissues, while the term “massive” refers to quantities which is administered or produced in rather large. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Matteo Bonetti, Valter Travagli Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

MS 23256-Reply to correspondence “Gaseous ozone or method of administration: hunt for the culprit”
We have read the correspondence written by Bonetti and Travagli carefully. First of all, we would like to thank the authors for reading our case report [1]. We appreciate the authors and the physicians who were applying ozone therapy. Also, we referred to some of the studies in the literature that show ozone therapy's efficacy. The authors mentioned that the term “massive” might not be appropriate. Of course, we know “massive” term means in medical language. We evaluate the patient with her history, physical examination, laboratory, and imaging studies for diagnosis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bugra Ilhan Source Type: research

A tattoo granuloma with uveitis (TAGU) without sarcoidosis
Tattooing is associated with a handful of potential complications. Short-term complications such as pain, pruritus, erythema, or swelling at the tattoo-site commonly occur from local skin trauma. Long-term complications tend to involve infections or immune-mediated reactions such as sarcoidosis. The sudden development of a papulonodular skin eruption affecting a particular pigment in a tattoo is often the initial manifestation of undiagnosed sarcoidosis in these patients. However, in a small number of individuals, the granulomatous change in the tattoo and uveitis occur in the absence of any evidence of sarcoidosis. (Sourc...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Radetic, Sami Khan, Arthi Venkat, Thomas Mendel, Michael Phelan Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Septic arthritis in a patient after tonsillectomy
We present a rare case of septic arthritis in a 6-year-old female of the ankle 3  days following tonsillectomy. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen G. Chong, Jesse Wray, Rachel E. Bridwell, Eric Chin Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

A case of a tattoo granuloma with uveitis (TAGU) without sarcoidosis
Tattooing is associated with a handful of potential complications. Short-term complications such as pain, pruritus, erythema, or swelling at the tattoo-site commonly occur from local skin trauma. Long-term complications tend to involve infections or immune-mediated reactions such as sarcoidosis. The sudden development of a papulonodular skin eruption affecting a particular pigment in a tattoo is often the initial manifestation of undiagnosed sarcoidosis in these patients. However, in a small number of individuals, the granulomatous change in the tattoo and uveitis occur in the absence of any evidence of sarcoidosis. (Sourc...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Radetic, Sami Khan, Arthi Venkat, Thomas Mendel, Michael Phelan Source Type: research

Septic arthritis in a patient after tonsillectomy: A case report
We present a rare case of septic arthritis in a 6-year-old female of the ankle 3  days following tonsillectomy. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen G. Chong, Jesse Wray, Rachel E. Bridwell, Eric Chin Source Type: research

Association of response time interval with neurological outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest according to bystander CPR
This study intended to find out how association between response time interval (RTI) and good neurological outcome is affected by bystander CPR. We hypothesized that bystander CPR will ensure positive effect in relationship between RTI and clinical outcome. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sungbae Moon, Hyun Wook Ryoo, Jae Yun Ahn, Dong Eun Lee, Sang Do Shin, Jeong Ho Park Source Type: research

Acute myocarditis associated with COVID-19 infection
We present the case of a 20-year-old male patient without previous history of cardiovascular disease who was admitted to our hospital with a new onset febrile sensation and chest pain. Chest computed tomography revealed a subpleural consolidation with a halo of ground-glass opacification. Blood tests revealed elevated levels of markers of myocyte necrosis (troponin I and creatine kinase –MB). Nasopharyngeal swab was positive for COVID-19. Cardiac MRI showed myocardial edema and late gadolinium enhancement compatible with myocarditis associated with COVID-19 infection. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Muhammed Said Be şler, Halil Arslan Source Type: research

Feasibility of bystander-administered naloxone delivered by drone to opioid overdose victims
Currently, ≤5% of bystanders witnessing an opioid overdose (OD) in the US administer antidote to the victim. A possible model to mitigate this crisis would be a system that enables 9-1-1 dispatchers to both rapidly deliver naloxone by drone to bystanders at a suspected opioid OD and direct them to administer it while awaiting EMS arrival. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph P. Ornato, Alan X. You, Gray McDiarmid, Lori Keyser-Marcus, Aaron Surrey, James Humble, Sirisha Dukkipati, Lacy Harkrader, Shane R. Davis, Jacob Moyer, David Tidwell, Mary Ann Peberdy Source Type: research

Comparison of topical capsaicin and topical piroxicam in the treatment of acute trauma-induced pain: A randomized double-blind trial
This study aimed to compare the analgesic efficacy of topical capsaicin and topical piroxicam in acute musculoskeletal injuries. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Abdullah Osman Kocak, Sinem Dogruyol, Ilker Akbas, Tugba Sanalp Menekse, Sultan Tuna Akgol Gur, Meryem Betos Kocak, Bora Cekmen, Serhat Orun, Zeynep Cakir Source Type: research

Effective intranasal cooling in an 80  year old patient with heatstroke
Intranasal cooling by the evaporation of perflourcarbon is almost exclusively used for the induction of therapeutic hypothermia in post-resuscitation care. This method has proven to be effective and safe. This case presents a successful application to a patient with external heatstroke. The 80  year old male patient was found in deep coma (GCS 4) by emergency medical services (EMS) showing a core temperature around 42 °C. Despite of preclinical physical cooling, the patient showed a persistent temperature of 41.5 °C upon reaching the emergency department. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - June 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Randi Manegold, David Fistera, Carola Holzner, Joachim Risse Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 31, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

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(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - May 31, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research