The DAGMAR Score: D-dimer assay-guided moderation of adjusted risk. Improving specificity of the D-dimer for pulmonary embolism
We generated a novel scoring system to improve the test characteristics of D-dimer in patients with suspected PE (pulmonary emboli).Electronic Medical Record data were retrospectively reviewed on Emergency Department (ED) patients 18  years or older for whom a D-dimer and imaging were ordered between June 4, 2012 and March 30, 2016. Symptoms (dyspnea, unilateral leg swelling, hemoptysis), age, vital signs, medical history (cancer, recent surgery, medications, history of deep vein thrombosis or PE, COPD, smoking), laboratory va lues (quantitative D-dimer, platelets, and mean platelet volume (MPV)), and imaging results (CT...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nancy Glober, Christopher R. Tainter, Jesse Brennan, Mark Darocki, Morgan Klingfus, Michelle Choi, Brenna Derksen, Frances Rudolf, Gabriel Wardi, Edward Castillo, Theodore Chan Source Type: research

Intravenous paracetamol versus dexketoprofen in acute musculoskeletal trauma in the emergency department: A randomised clinical trial
Musculoskeletal system traumas are among the most common presentations in the emergency departments. In the treatment of traumatic musculoskeletal pain, paracetamol and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesics (NSAID) are frequently used. Our aim in this study is to compare the efficacy of intravenous dexketoprofen and paracetamol in the treatment of traumatic musculoskeletal pain. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Atakan Yilmaz, Ramazan Sabirli, Mert Ozen, Ibrahim Turkcuer, Bulent Erdur, Cuneyt Arikan, Ezgi Demirozogul, Ahmet Sarohan, Murat Seyit, Nusret Ok Source Type: research

Utilization of chest CT for injured patients during visits to U.S. emergency departments: 2012 –2015
Increased use of computed tomography (CT) during injury-related Emergency Department (ED) visits has been reported, despite increased awareness of CT radiation exposure risks. We investigated national trends in the use of chest CT during injury-related ED visits between 2012 and 2015. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brian J. Yun, Robert M. Rodriguez, Anand M. Prabhakar, David A. Peak, DaMarcus E. Baymon, Ali S. Raja Source Type: research

Laryngopyocele: A deep neck infection diagnosed by emergency ultrasound
Laryngopyocele is a rare diagnosis that can cause life-threating conditions such as airway obstruction and even death. Emergency ultrasound (POCUS) can be very helpful during the diagnosis and monitoring of the illness because it is both easy to apply and repeatable. A deep neck infection was diagnosed as laryngopyocele by POCUS in the emergency department; this is the first case in the literature. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mehmet Ali Aslaner Source Type: research

Tracheal rupture as a result of coughing
Tracheal rupture is a rare injury that can result in life-threatening complications. It is mostly caused by trauma or iatrogenic reasons such as endotracheal intubation, tracheostomy, neck and chest surgeries. Spontaneous tracheal rupture is seen more rarely and all the spontaneous tracheal ruptures defined in literature include posterior membranous wall which is the weakest portion of the trachea [1-8]. Based on our knowledge, our case of anterolateral spontaneous tracheal rupture as a result of coughing is the first case reported. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Meltem Akkas, Canan Tiambeng, Nalan Metin Aksu, Ruhi Onur Source Type: research

Uveitis and acute glaucoma as first presenting symptoms of sarcoidosis in a healthy male
Sarcoidosis is a disease characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas in many tissues. The granulomas most commonly affect the lungs and the disease commonly presents with bilateral hilar adenopathy, lesions on the eyes, skin, or joints, and pulmonary reticular opacities [1]. Between 30 and 60% cases of pulmonary sarcoidosis are found through routine chest X-rays and considered asymptomatic [2]. There is no known etiology. It is estimated to affect 10 to 20 per 100,000 [1]. (See Fig. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Olivia Hallas, Andrew Yocum, Damien Jackson, Erin L. Simon Source Type: research

Foreign body sensation: A rare case of dysphagia lusoria in a healthy female
Dysphagia lusoria is a rare disease due to an aberrant right subclavian artery that passes posteriorly between the esophagus and the spine1. David Bayford coined the term itself meaning "freak or jest of nature" in 1761 describing a case in which the patient had long term dysphagia that eventually led to death. Most cases of dysphagia are due to an aberrant right subclavian artery running posterior to and causing esophageal compression, but only 20-40% of aberrant arteries actually lead to trachea-esophageal symptoms, including dysphagia2. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rajalakshmy Arakoni, Rebecca Merrill, Erin L. Simon Source Type: research

Novel method of infant chest compression. Does the arrangement of the thumbs matter?
Following the discussion [1-3] on a novel technique for chest compression in infants and newborns (nTTT), described in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine [4], we decided to examine whether the angle of chest compression in accordance with the technique affected the basic quality parameters of resuscitation. Infant chest compression with nTTT is described as follows: “the ‘new two-thumb technique’ (nTTT) of chest compressions in an infant consists in using two thumbs directed at the angle of 90° to the chest while closing the fingers of both hands in a fist” [5]. (Source: The American Jou...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 8, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kurt Ruetzler, Jacek Smereka, Lukasz Szarpak, Michael Czekajlo Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Point-of-care influenza testing does not significantly shorten time to disposition among patients with an influenza-like illness
Availability of anti-viral agents and need to isolate infected patients increases the need to confirm the diagnosis of influenza before determining patient disposition. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elissa M. Schechter-Perkins, Patricia M. Mitchell, Kerrie P. Nelson, James H. Liu, Angela Shannon, Jean Ahern, Beverley Orr, Nancy S. Miller Source Type: research

Progress towards reducing crowding
Crowding is one of the greatest threats to ED function, and most crowding is driven by delays which occur after emergency medical care is finished and patients are waiting for consultation, admission or transfer involving a different part of the hospital. Multiple crowding-related interventions both inside and outside the ED have been described, in a segment of the literature fraught with publication bias [1] since we tend to both report and publish only the things which work. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Drew Richardson Source Type: research

Hospital Information Technology is critical to the success of a point-of-care ultrasound program
Over the past two decades, advances in point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) technology have not only made it more accessible to providers, but also allowed its integration into the increasingly electronic workflow of the modern healthcare system. The breadth of this integration includes most aspects of a typical POCUS clinical workflow as well as image archival and retrieval, documentation, quality assurance and billing. Attempts to modernize existing processes often lead to alienation of low-end users, which in turn negates the intended benefits of the technology. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Arthur K. Au, Srikar Adhikari, Benjamin H. Slovis, Peter B. Sachs, Resa E. Lewiss Source Type: research

Preparation of lifeguards to Basic Life Support in the drowning
A lifeguard needs to start cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the drowning with breath absence as soon as possible, even before taking them out from water [1]. First Aid/CPR/AED knowledge and skills should be taught during the Lifeguard Candidates (LC) training [2] rather than later on a first aid course or a qualified first aid course (QFAC). Currently in Poland, one can participate in QFAC even several months after completing the lifeguard training [3]. The American Red Cross, lifeguarding training provider in the US requires certified refresher First Aid/CPR/AED training every two years [4]. (Source: The American Jo...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jerzy Kiszka, Iwona Tabaczek-Bejster, Katarzyna Walicka-Cupry ś Source Type: research

Pharmacist impact on sepsis bundle compliance through participation on an emergency department sepsis alert team
The 2012 Surviving Sepsis Campaign's guidelines for the management of severe sepsis and septic shock introduced 3-hour and 6-hour sepsis management bundles to facilitate appropriate and timely treatment [1]. These bundles emphasize the importance of early identification through collection of blood cultures, lactate measurements, fluid resuscitation, and prompt administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics [1-2]. Multiple studies have shown a reduction in mortality with bundled sepsis management [3,4]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicholas Yarbrough, Meghan Bloxam, James Priano, Patricia Louzon Lynch, Lauren N. Hunt, Jennifer Elfman Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Platelet indices may not be associated with diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal bleeding
I read with a great interest the article of Senel et al. about the diagnostic and prognostic value of platelet indices in the gastrointestinal system bleeding [1]. The authors reported that platelet indices might be used in diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal bleeding. I would like to comment about this paper. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Cengiz Beyan Source Type: research

Assessing the methodological quality of retrospective research protocols
Medical records are informal collections of impressions and observations that contain both objective and subjective information attained during the patient care process. They are not designed or created for research but frequently are used for this secondary purpose. While chart review studies tend to be inexpensive, relatively easily performed, and do not generally require specialized equipment, there are limitations to this type of study [1]. Information in medical charts is usually at least two steps removed from the patient with clinicians recording patient information, often with an intermediate transcription, followe...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey Ouellette, Stacy L. Gardner, Betsy Wilson, Angela D. Faber, Jeffrey Jones Source Type: research

Reply to the Letter titled “Platelet indices may not be associated with diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal bleeding”
I've read the letter titled “Platelet indices may not be associated with diagnosis and prognosis of gastrointestinal bleeding”, which was sent by an esteemed reader, with great interest. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tugba Senel, Burak Furkan Demir, Ihsan Ates Source Type: research

Diagnostic accuracy of a rapid telemedicine encounter in the Emergency Department
Emergency Department crowding is an increasing problem, leading to treatment delays and higher risk of mortality. Our institution recently implemented a telemedicine physician intake ( “tele-intake”) process as a mitigating front-end strategy. Previous studies have focused on ED throughput metrics such as door to disposition; our work aimed to specifically assess the tele-intake model for clinical accuracy. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph A. Izzo, Jonathan Watson, Rahul Bhat, Matthew Wilson, Joseph Blumenthal, Christina Houser, Edward Descallar, Daniel Hoffman, Ethan Booker Source Type: research

Diagnostic accuracy of laboratory and ultrasound findings in patients with a non-visualized appendix
Ultrasound (US) and laboratory testing are initial diagnostic tests for acute appendicitis. A diagnostic dilemma develops when the appendix is not visualized on US. Objective: To determine if specific US findings and/or laboratory results predict acute appendicitis when the appendix is not visualized. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on children (birth-18  yrs) presenting to the pediatric emergency department with suspected acute appendicitis who underwent right lower quadrant US.Children with previous appendectomy, US at another facility, or eloped were excluded. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Laurie Malia, Jesse J. Sturm, Sharon R. Smith, R. Timothy Brown, Brendan Campbell, Henry Chicaiza Source Type: research

Suspected gonorrhea and chlamydia: Incidence and utilization of empiric antibiotics in a health system emergency department setting
This study will allow providers to better identify patients with potential GC to streamline antibiotic treatment. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jenna Garlock, Leborah Lee, Michaelia Cucci, Lawrence Frazee, Chanda Mullen Source Type: research

Pyelonephritis treatment in the community emergency department: Cephalosporins vs. first-line agents
The purpose of this study was to assess treatment with a fluoroquinolone or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole versus cephalosporins for pyelonephritis in discharged patients from a community hospital setting. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shaylyn Vogler, Emily Pavich Source Type: research

On-demand synchronous audio video telemedicine visits are cost effective
Claims data raises the possibility that on demand telemedicine programs might increase new utilization, offsetting the cost benefits described in some retrospective analyses.We prospectively evaluated the cost of a synchronous audio-video on-demand telemedicine taking into account both what patients would have done instead of the telemedicine visit as well as the care patients received after the visit. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Garrison Nord, Kristin L. Rising, Roger A. Band, Brendan G. Carr, Judd E. Hollander Source Type: research

Urgent care peripheral nerve blocks for refractory trigeminal neuralgia
After medication failure, patients with refractory trigeminal neuralgia (TGN) often present urgently and seek more potent or invasive therapies such as opioids or surgical options. Peripheral nerve blocks, safe and simple, may offer extended pain relief prior to opioid use or more invasive ganglion level procedures. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael D. Perloff, Justin S. Chung Source Type: research

Generalized anxiety disorder among emergency department patients
Mental illness is common among the US population with an overall estimated 8% prevalence. Previous studies have estimated undiagnosed mental illness in the ED at 41 –42%, with only a minority identified by the treating physician [1,2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Catherine A. Marco, Justin Anderson, Mitchell McMurray, Matthew Lovell, Jaree Naqvi, Nicholas Seitz Source Type: research

Communication and bed reservation: Decreasing the length of stay for emergency department trauma patients
Prolonged emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and patient experience. At our community hospital, trauma patients were experiencing extended ED LOS incommensurate with their clinical status. Our objective was to determine if operational modifications to patient flow would reduce the LOS for trauma patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 7, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Derrick Huang, Aveh Bastani, William Anderson, Janice Crabtree, Scott Kleiman, Shanna Jones Source Type: research

Reducing mortality in near-hanging patients with a novel early management protocol
Hanging is one of the most common causes of suicide world-wide, more prevalent in developing countries. There are no established protocols for early management of near-hanging patients who present to the emergency department (ED). The use of early intubation, strict blood pressure control and targeted temperature management has shown promise in small studies. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Muralitharan Tharmarajah, Hamza Ijaz, Mimi Vallabhai, Narendra Nath Jena, Maxine LeSaux, Jeffrey P. Smith, Chen Chen, Yan Ma, Katherine A. Douglass, Andrew C. Meltzer Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Reducing mortality in near-hanging patients with a novel early management protocol: A prospective cohort study in India
Hanging is one of the most common causes of suicide world-wide, more prevalent in developing countries. There are no established protocols for early management of near-hanging patients who present to the emergency department (ED). The use of early intubation, strict blood pressure control and targeted temperature management has shown promise in small studies. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 6, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Muralitharan Tharmarajah, Hamza Ijaz, Mimi Vallabhai, Narendra Nath Jena, Maxine Le Saux, Jeffrey P. Smith, Chen Chen, Yan Ma, Katherine A. Douglass, Andrew C. Meltzer Source Type: research

Pediatric extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation settled in an emergency department for a propafenone intentional intoxication
We present a pediatric case of intentional ingestion of 1.8  g of propafenone that caused refractory cardiogenic shock. The patient was successfully rescued with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency department of a secondary level peripheral hospital. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 3, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marco Marano, Bianca M. Goffredo, Mara Pisani, Sergio Filippelli, Corrado Cecchetti, Fabrizio Drago, Maria A. Barbieri, Joseph Nunziata, Leonardo Genuini, Matteo Di Nardo Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Pediatric extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation settled in an emergency room for a propafenone intentional intoxication
We present a pediatric case of intentional ingestion of 1.8  g of propafenone that caused refractory cardiogenic shock. The patient was successfully rescued with extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in the emergency room of a secondary level peripheral hospital. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 3, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marco Marano, Bianca M. Goffredo, Mara Pisani, Sergio Filippelli, Corrado Cecchetti, Fabrizio Drago, Maria A. Barbieri, Joseph Nunziata, Leonardo Genuini, Matteo Di Nardo Source Type: research

Comparison of ultrasonography and computed tomography in the determination of traumatic thoracic injuries
In this study, the accuracy of bedside thoracic ultrasonography (TUSG) performed by emergency physicians with patients in the supine position was compared with that of thoracic computed tomography (TCT) for the determination of thoracic injuries due to trauma. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 3, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nalan Kozaci, Mustafa Avc ı, Ertan Ararat, Tansu Pinarbasili, Muharrem Ozkaya, Ibrahim Etli, Eda Donertas, Omer F. Karakoyun Source Type: research

Emergency medicine practice environment and impact on concert examination performance
This study was undertaken to identify practice settings of emergency physicians, and to determine if there was a difference in performance on the 2017 ConCert between physicians of differing practice types and settings. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Catherine A. Marco, Robert P. Wahl, James D. Thomas, Ramon W. Johnson, O. John Ma, Anne L. Harvey, Earl J. Reisdorff Source Type: research

Comparison of the age-adjusted and clinical probability-adjusted D-dimer to exclude pulmonary embolism in the emergency department
Diagnosing pulmonary embolism (PE) in the emergency department (ED) can be challenging because its signs and symptoms are non-specific. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sameer Sharif, Michelle Eventov, Clive Kearon, Sameer Parpia, Meirui Li, River Jiang, Paula Sneath, Carmen Otero Fuentes, Christopher Marriott, Kerstin de Wit Source Type: research

Emergency department provider and facility variation in opioid prescriptions for discharged patients
To study the variation in opioid prescribing among emergency physicians and facilities for discharged adult ED patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 30, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael J. Ward, K.C. Diwas, Cathy A. Jenkins, Dandan Liu, Amit Padaki, Jesse M. Pines Source Type: research

Impact of an emergency medicine pharmacist on empiric antibiotic prescribing for pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections
This study aimed to determine the impact of an EMP on appropriate empiric antibiotic prescribing for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and intra-abdominal infections (CA-IAI). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 28, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Benjamin D. Kulwicki, Kasey L. Brandt, Lauren M. Wolf, Andrew J. Weise, Lisa E. Dumkow Source Type: research

Comparison of pediatric post-reduction fluoroscopic- and ultrasound forearm fracture images
Emergency department (ED) reduction of pediatric fractures occurs most commonly in the forearm and can be challenging if fluoroscopy is not available. We sought to assess the ability of point of-care ultrasonography (POCUS) to predict adequacy of reduction by fluoroscopy. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 27, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jonathan D. Auten, John H. Naheedy, Nicole D. Hurst, Andrew T. Pennock, Kathryn A. Hollenbach, John T. Kanegaye Source Type: research

Acute presentations of infective endocarditis
Long and Koyfman have highlighted the acute presentation of infective endocarditis (IE) in intravenous drug users [1]. The acute presentation includes a range of pulmonary stigmata which may dominate the clinical picture almost to the exclusion of an index of suspicion for IE. Those stigmata include chest pain, cough, haemoptysis, pulmonary infarction, lung abscess, pleural effusion, and empyema, respectively, all ultimately attributable to septic emboli [2]. Another acute presentation is the one characterised by acute left ventricular failure and severe breathlessness as a result of IE-related acute aortic valve regurgita...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

What are the key elements in suture education? Comparison of cosmetic appearances after facial lacerations repaired by junior residents and experts
The technical factors which improve cosmetic outcomes and which need to be emphasized in education of junior residents have yet to be described. We compared cases in which suturing was performed by either junior emergency medicine residents or experts, in order to determine the focus of future education and training. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jin Hong Min, Yeon Ho You, Yong Chul Cho, Won Joon Jeong, Jung Soo Park, Se Kwang Oh, Sung Uk Cho, Yong Nam In, Chi Hwan Kwack, In Sool Yoo Source Type: research

Cecal volvulus in long-distance runners: A proposed mechanism
Participation in marathons and other endurance exercise, including formal sporting events such as triathlons, and the “Ironman” challenge are steadily increasing [1]. Specifically, the popularity of marathon running has increased dramatically: from an estimated 25,000 marathon finishers in 1976, to>500,000 in 2015; this represents a 20-fold increase in the past 4 decades [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brent D. Bauman, Jennifer E. Witt, Victor Vakayil, Shumaila Anwer, Eric D. Irwin, Mary R. Kwaan, Timothy L. Pruett, James V. Harmon Source Type: research

Serum lactate as a predictor of neurologic outcome in emergency department patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning
This study was conducted to assess and clarify the predictive risk factor of neurologic outcome in patients with acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jong Woo Jung, Jun Ho Lee Source Type: research

Ultrasound guided erector spinae plane block for bilateral lumbar transverse process fracture: A new or a pushing indication?
We have read with great interest a case report written by Ahiskalioglu et al. [1] entitled “Erector spinae plane block for bilateral lumbar transverse process fracture in emergency department: A new indication”. They performed an erector spinae plane (ESP) block at the T10 level for a 60-year-old female patient who presented with a bilateral isolated L2 transverse process fracture. Th e ESP block was described by Ferero et al. [2]. The ESP block has been used as a postoperative analgesia technique for various indications such as thoracic surgery and mastectomy. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ince Ilker, Khan Mohammad Zafeer, Shimada Tetsuya Source Type: research

The feasibility of an inter-professional transitions of care service in an older adult population
Older adults discharged from the Emergency Department (ED) are at high risk for medication interactions and side effects; examples of practice models addressing this transition of care are lacking. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren T. Southerland, Brianne L. Porter, Nicholas W. Newman, Kimberly Payne, Cara Hoyt, Jennifer L. Rodis Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Risk factors for necrosis of skin flap-like wounds after debridement and suture in the emergency room
Skin flap-like wounds are common. These wound flaps are prone to avascular necrosis with simple debrided and sutured, and postoperative hyperplastic scarring and contracture of wound surfaces can adversely affect the patient's appearance. Here, we evaluate the data of cases with flap-like wounds to identify the causes of flap necrosis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daojing Qiu, Xinglei Wang, Xiao Wang, Ya Jiao, Yaonan Li, Duyin Jiang Source Type: research

Comparison of cosmetic appearances after facial lacerations repaired by junior residents and experts
The technical factors which improve cosmetic outcomes and which need to be emphasized in education of junior residents have yet to be described. We compared cases in which suturing was performed by either junior emergency medicine residents or experts, in order to determine the focus of future education and training. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jin Hong Min, Yeon Ho You, Yong Chul Cho, Won Joon Jeong, Jung Soo Park, Se Kwang Oh, Sung Uk Cho, Yong Nam In, Chi Hwan Kwack, In Sool Yoo Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Serum lactate as a predictor of neurologic outcome in ED patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning
This study was conducted to assess and clarify the predictive risk factor of neurologic outcome in patients with acute carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jong Woo Jung, Jun Ho Lee Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Risk factors for necrosis of skin flap-like wounds after ED debridement and suture
Skin flap-like wounds are common. These wound flaps are prone to avascular necrosis with simple debrided and sutured, and postoperative hyperplastic scarring and contracture of wound surfaces can adversely affect the patient's appearance. Here, we evaluate the data of cases with flap-like wounds to identify the causes of flap necrosis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 24, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daojing Qiu, Xinglei Wang, Xiao Wang, Ya Jiao, Yaonan Li, Duyin Jiang Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Variation in diagnostic testing for older patients with syncope in the emergency department
Older adults presenting with syncope often undergo intensive diagnostic testing with unclear benefit. We determined the variation, frequency, yield, and costs of tests obtained to evaluate older persons with syncope. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 23, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher W. Baugh, Benjamin C. Sun, the Syncope Risk Stratification Study Group Source Type: research

Management of children presenting with low back pain to emergency department. A 7-year retrospective study
We aimed to describe characteristics, etiology and health care use in children with low back pain (LBP) presenting to pediatric emergency department (ED) and to develop an algorithm to design a diagnostic approach. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Francesco Saverio Biagiarelli, Simone Piga, Antonino Reale, Pasquale Parisi, Marta Luisa Ciofi degli Atti, Angelo Gabriele Aulisa, Paolo Schingo, Chiara Ossella, Maria Pia Villa, Umberto Raucci Source Type: research

Perceived electrical shock and Bayesian inference with multisensory stimuli
An electrical-accident victim's recollection may be dramatically distorted by Bayesian inference in multisensory integration. Suddenly hearing the sound and seeing the bright flash of an electrical arc can cause a person to form the honest but false impression that they had experienced an electrical shock. Bayesian causal inference governs multisensory perceptual processing in general [1, 2]. If the sensory signals are largely consistent, the brain will infer a common cause for the signals and integrate them [1, 3-6]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Kroll, Mollie B. Ritter, Peter Perkins, Ladan Shams, Chris Andrews Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Management of children presenting with low back pain to emergency department.
We aimed to describe characteristics, etiology and health care use in children with low back pain (LBP) presenting to pediatric emergency department (ED) and to develop an algorithm to design a diagnostic approach. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 21, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Francesco Saverio Biagiarelli, Simone Piga, Antonino Reale, Pasquale Parisi, Marta Luisa Ciofi degli Atti, Angelo Gabriele Aulisa, Paolo Schingo, Chiara Ossella, Maria Pia Villa, Umberto Raucci Tags: Original Contribution Source Type: research

Are testers also admitters? Comparing emergency physician resource utilization and admitting practices
To describe the relationship between emergency department resource utilization and admission rate at the level of the individual physician. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 20, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicole R. Hodgson, Souroush Saghafian, Lanyu Mi, Matthew R. Buras, Eric D. Katz, Jesse M. Pines, Leon Sanchez, Scott Silvers, Steven A. Maher, Stephen J. Traub Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - July 19, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research