Subclavian artery aneurysmal rupture and left internal mammary artery extravasation secondary to advanced Marfan syndrome
This case highlights the unusual life-threatening findings found in a patient with Marfan syndrome (MFS) in the emergency department setting. MFS is a rare autosomal dominant disease that affects 1 in 3000 –5000 individuals and has a highly variable range of clinical severity.This case is a 63-year-old male with COPD, scoliosis, aortic and mitral valve replacements on warfarin, and MFS who presented with acute onset hemoptysis, tachypnea, and oxygen saturation of 77% on 4 l nasal cannula. Emergent chest computed tomography angiography (CTA) revealed both a contained rupture of a left subclavian artery aneurysm and ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alex U. Siegel, Alexandra Castro, Jacob Sechrist Source Type: research

Impact of a shelter-in-place order during the COVID-19 pandemic on the incidence of opioid overdoses
This study aims to assess the role of the COVID-19 pandemic on the incidence of opioid overdose before and after a SIP order. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer Rosenbaum, Nicole Lucas, Gregory Zandrow, Wayne A. Satz, Derek Isenberg, Joseph D'Orazio, Nina T. Gentile, Kraftin E. Schreyer Source Type: research

The safety of the sepsis fluid bolus for patients at increased risk of volume overload
Sepsis, caused by a dysregulated host response to infection, is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity affecting millions annually and killing one in four afflicted [1]. Guidelines recommend rapid intravenous (IV) fluid resuscitation of at least 30  mL/kg in septic patients in order to improve outcomes [1]. Many hospitals consider this intervention a core measure for which adherence is tracked. However, since fluid overload increases the risk of intubation [2], physicians are wary to aggressively fluid-resuscitate septic patients who are at risk of fluid-overload – namely, patients with congestive heart fai...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Murtaza Akhter, Terence Potter, Jeffrey Stowell Source Type: research

A randomized controlled trial of adding intravenous corticosteroids to H1 antihistamines in patients with acute urticaria
We have read the original article entitled “A randomized controlled trial of adding intravenous corticosteroids to H1-antihistamines in patients with acute urticaria” by Palungwachira et al. published in American Journal of Emergency Medicine (2020 Feb 19. pii: S0735–6757(20)30098-X. doi:10.1016/j.ajem.2020.02.025) [1]. We would like t o congratulate the authors for this rational study, and to make some contributions on this subject. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mustafa Arga, Özlem Cavkaytar, Hamdi Cihan Emeksiz Source Type: research

Barriers to point-of-care ultrasound utilization during cardiac arrest in the emergency department: a regional survey of emergency physicians
Though point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is recognized as a useful diagnostic and prognostic intervention during cardiac arrest (CA), critics advise caution. The purpose of this survey study was to determine the barriers to POCUS during CA in the Emergency Department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mallika R. Singh, Jennifer S. Jackson, Mark A. Newberry, Cameron Riopelle, Vu Huy Tran, Leila L. PoSaw Source Type: research

Recreational ketamine-induced cholangiopathy and ulcerative cystitis
We report a case of a teenage patient with the rare simultaneous presentation of ketamine-induced cholangiopathy and ulcerative cystitis. Due to increased recreational and chronic ketamine use, cases of ketamine-induced cholangiopathy and ulcerative cystitis are likely to rise with the increased knowledge, awareness, and reporting of these entities by radiologists and emergency physicians. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David M. Vu, Katerina Freyre-Diaz, Oleg Opsha, Yekaterina Opsha Source Type: research

Time to first defibrillation and survival outcomes of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with refractory ventricular fibrillation
This study aimed to determine whether the time to first defibrillation was associated with good neurological outcomes in OHCA patients with refractory ventricular fibrillation. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stephen Gyung Won Lee, Jeong Ho Park, Young Sun Ro, Ki Jeong Hong, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin Source Type: research

eccSOFA: SOFA illness severity score adapted to predict in-hospital mortality in emergency critical care patients
Boarding of ICU patients in the ED is increasing. Illness severity scores may help emergency physicians stratify risk to guide earlier transfer to the ICU and assess pre-ICU interventions by adjusting for baseline mortality risk. Most existing illness severity scores are based on data that is not available at the time of the hospital admission decision or cannot be extracted from the electronic health record (EHR). We adapted the SOFA score to create a new illness severity score (eccSOFA) that can be calculated at the time of ICU admission order entry in the ED using EHR data. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kian Niknam, Jason Nesbitt, Tsuyoshi Mitarai, Matthew J.R. Nudelman, Alexandra June Gordon, Jennifer G. Wilson, Michael A. Kohn Source Type: research

Assessing the impact of resuscitation residents on the treatment of cardiopulmonary resuscitation patients
The objective of this study is to compare 30-day mortality between cardiac arrest patients with resuscitation resident (RR) involvement versus patients without. Our secondary outcome is to determine if RR involvement altered rates of initiating targeted temperature management (TTM). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David M. Lee, David A. Berger, Patrick A. Wloszczynski, Patrick Karabon, Lihua Qu, Michael J. Burla Source Type: research

D-Dimer as a potential biomarker for disease severity in COVID-19
This study seeks to determine the utility of D-dimer levels as a biomarker in determining disease severity and prognosis in COVID-19. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mert Ozen, Atakan Yilmaz, Vefa Cakmak, Resad Beyoglu, Alten Oskay, Murat Seyit, Hande Senol Source Type: research

Medications for treatment of agitation in the emergency department: Let's not be too fast to conclude to a status quo
It was with great interest that we read the article by Schneider et al. [1]. The issue of managing agitation in the emergency department is important for every emergency physician. Although these situations are infrequent on a daily basis, they are of great systemic importance because they require a significant amount of human and logistical resources in an extremely urgent manner, often under threat of material or even physical violence towards the staff. The conclusions of the work of Schneider et al. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicolas Cazes, Aur élien Renard Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Post-arrest wide complex rhythm: What is the cause of death?
A 72-year-old man presented to the ED following witnessed cardiac arrest. After return of spontaneous circulation, an ECG was performed which demonstrated a wide complex rhythm with “shark fin” morphology. With careful examination it is possible to identify the J point and determine that the electrocardiogram (ECG) findings actually represent massive ST-elevation indicative of occlusion myocardial infarction (OMI). Initial troponin was undetectable. The patient underwent em ergent cardiac catheterization and had a 100% proximal LAD occlusion that was successfully stented. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexander Bracey, Pendell Meyers, Stephen W. Smith Source Type: research

Prognostic significance of cardiac troponin level in Covid-19 patients without known cardiovascular risk factors
The coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an ongoing global pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The SARS-CoV-2 primarily infects the lung epithelial cells via angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) receptor [1], thereby causing respiratory signs and symptoms. Meanwhile, since ACE-2 is highly expressed in the cardiac myocytes, it is observed that the SARS-CoV-2 can also cause cardiac injury [2,3], thereby leading poor outcomes in Covid-19 cases. However, there is a very limited data about whether admission cardiac troponin levels are associated with a poor survival in Covid...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tufan Çınar, Mert İlker Hayıroğlu, Vedat Çiçek, Şahhan Kılıç, Süha Asal, Selami Doğan, Mehmet Şeker, Murat Selçuk, Mehmet Uzun, Ahmet Lütfullah Orhan Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Toc
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Info for authors
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Zoster meningitis in an immunocompetent host with headache and atypical rash
We present a case of Herpes zoster (HZ) meningitis in a young healthy male adult with major presenting symptom of headache and new-onset rash to underscore the variation in atypical presentations of aseptic meningitis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shadi Khalil, Eva Tovar Hirashima Source Type: research

Nicardipine: When high dose nitrates fail in treating heart failure
We present a case report of a patient with refractory hypertension to high dose nitrates likely due to nitroglycerin resistance or an attenuated response. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jason R. Raggi, Thomas W. O'Connell, Daniel J. Singer Source Type: research

Derivation of a prediction model for emergency department acute kidney injury
Quality management of Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) is dependent on early detection, which is currently deemed to be suboptimal. The aim of this study was to identify combinations of variables associated with AKI and to derive a prediction tool for detecting patients attending the emergency department (ED) or hospital with AKI (ED-AKI). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aled O. Phillips, David A. Foxwell, Sara Pradhan, Soha Zouwail, Timothy H. Rainer Source Type: research

External validation of prehospital stroke scales for emergent large vessel occlusion
It is suggested that a prehospital scale should be utilized to identify patients with emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO). We aimed to perform external validation of nine ELVO scales. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yu-Chen Chiu, Ming-Ju Hsieh, Yen-Heng Lin, Sung-Chun Tang, Jen-Tang Sun, Wen-Chu Chiang, Li-Kai Tsai, Chung-Wei Lee, Yu-Ching Lee, Jiann-Shing Jeng Source Type: research

Factors associated with Interhospital transfers of emergency general surgery patients from emergency departments
Emergency general surgery (EGS) conditions account for over 3 million or 7.1% of hospitalizations per year in the US. Patients are increasingly transferred from community emergency departments (EDs) to larger centers for care, and a growing demand for treating EGS conditions mandates a better understanding of how ED clinicians transfer patients. We identify patient, clinical, and organizational characteristics associated with interhospital transfers of EGS patients originating from EDs in the United States. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sara Fernandes-Taylor, Dou-Yan Yang, Jessica Schumacher, Fiona Ljumani, Baruch Fertel, Angela Ingraham Source Type: research

Pediatric barrier enclosure for nasopharyngeal suctioning during Covid-19 pandemic: A simulation based-study
Nasopharyngeal Suctioning (NS) is a common procedure for upper respiratory tract infections in children. However, this procedure represents a risk of transmission of SARS-Cov-2 [1] during fall and upcoming winter seasons as flu and Covid-19 diseases are concomitant, and symptoms are similar [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Buyck, Arielle Levy, Laurence Tabone, Carl-Eric Aubin, Philippe Jouvet, Florent Baudin Source Type: research

The author's response to “The causality between suicide-related mortality and previous emergency psychiatric consultation”
Thank you for the meaningful opinions. It is an honor to be able to answer the valuable comments. As authors of the paper mentioned in this letter, we would like to give our opinion. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeong Min Son, Joo Jeong Source Type: research

The emergency department care for hemodialysis patient during the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic poses significant challenges to patients with end-stage kidney disease who receive treatment in outpatient dialysis centers. These patients represent a fragile population that is at higher risk for both infection and transmission. At the start of the pandemic, many suspected COVID-19 dialysis patients were diverted to the emergency department (ED) for testing/treatment, placing a tremendous burden on the ED and inpatient dialysis units. Several recommendations and guidelines have been established to optimize patient care while also decreasing the burden on the ED and inpatient dialysis units and maxim...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: M.B. Connealy, S.Q. Lew, M. Alsamman, J.J. Lange, A. Pourmand Source Type: research

Is the use of greater than 1  L of intravenous crystalloids associated with worse outcomes in trauma patients?
Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend only 1  L of intravenous (IV) crystalloid before transitioning to blood products. We sought to determine if receiving>1  L of IV crystalloid during the initial resuscitation is associated with worse outcomes. We also sought to determine if receiving no crystalloids is associated with better outcomes. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tony Zitek, Ramsey Ataya, Lian Farino, Salman Mohammed, Glenn Miller Source Type: research

Safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine in 152 outpatients with confirmed COVID-19: A pilot observational study
We investigated the efficacy and safety of hydroxychloroquine for empirical treatment of outpatients with confirmed COVID-19. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ozgur Sogut, Mehmet Mustafa Can, Ramazan Guven, Onur Kaplan, H üseyin Ergenc, Tuba Betül Ümit, Olgun Demir, Murat Kaya, Tarık Akdemir, Sümeyye Çakmak Source Type: research

Comparison of efficacy dimenhydrinate and metoclopramide in the treatment of nausea due to vertigo; a randomized study
This study aimed to compare the therapeutic efficacy of dimenhydrinate and metoclopramide in patients with nausea and vertigo. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dogan Ercin, Bulent Erdur, Ibrahim Turkcuer, Murat Seyit, Mert Ozen, Atakan Yilmaz, Dilek Ozge Zincir Ercin Source Type: research

Is the use of greater than 1  L of intravenous crystalloids associated with worse outcomes in trauma patients?
Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend only 1  L of intravenous (IV) crystalloid before transitioning to blood products. We sought to determine if receiving>1  L of IV crystalloid during the initial resuscitation is associated with worse outcomes. We also sought to determine if receiving no crystalloids is associated with better outcomes. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tony Zitek, Ramsey Ataya, Lian Farino, Salman Mohammed, Glenn Miller Source Type: research

Provider-in-triage prediction of hospital admission after brief patient interaction
We sought to determine if emergency physician providers working in the triage area (PIT) of the ED could accurately predict the likelihood of admission for patients at the time of triage. Such predictions, if accurate, could decrease the time spent in the ED for patients who are admitted to the hospital by hastening downstream workflow. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael D. Zwank, Jenny J. Koops, Nell R. Adams Source Type: research

The causality between suicide-related mortality and previous emergency psychiatric consultation
In a recent research article, Jeong et al. [1] concluded that previous emergency psychiatric consultation could decrease the suicide-related mortality for suicide re-attempts. The research results showed the patients who had received psychiatric treatment in previous suicide attempts had lower suicide-related mortality compared to patients who did not. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Zheli Chen, Liang Xu Source Type: research

Trends in outpatient emergency department visits during the COVID-19 pandemic at a large, urban, academic hospital system
The objective of this study was to explore trends in the number of outpatient (treat and release) ED visits during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Theodoros V. Giannouchos, Joseph Biskupiak, Michael J. Moss, Diana Brixner, Elena Andreyeva, Benjamin Ukert Source Type: research

Emergency service experience following the terrorist attack in Mogadishu, 14 October 2017, a scene of lay rescuer triage
In this study, we aimed to share our experience and to discuss the importance of triage and prehospital care systems. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mustafa Enes Demirel, İbrahim Hussein Ali, Mustafa Boğan Source Type: research

Resident physician perception on how food choice affects wellness and professional development
The wellness of physicians in training has received significant attention in recent years as physicians have been found to be at higher risk of burnout, depression, and suicide than the general population [1-3]. The American Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) now requires residency programs to provide education to residents regarding wellness strategies and resources [4]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yudith Diaz Baez, Jason D. Chodakowski, Mark B. Mycyk, Amy V. Kontrick Source Type: research

Mosquito borne illness in a Floridian hiker
Chikungunya is an arboviral infection that manifests as an acute viral illness associated with an inflammatory arthritis. It was first described during an outbreak in Tanzania in 1952 and, until 2013, outbreaks had been limited in Africa, Asia, Europe and the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In late 2013, the first local transmission of Chikungunya was identified in Caribbean countries with subsequent spread throughout Central and South America. In 2019, the CDC reported 171 travel-associated cases of Chikungunya in the United States. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Aleem Azal Ali, Belinda Bajric, Carmen L. Isache, Ravindra P. Maharaj Source Type: research

“Bring 'em all”: The ED in a tradition of refuge
The rapid deployment of advanced emergency medical care is a celebrated function of the modern emergency department. However, as anyone who has worked in an ED can attest, a wide array of conditions and situations are cared for which defy straightforward medical categorization. It is not uncommon for victims of human trafficking; the cold, hungry, and homeless; the estranged elderly; those in custody by law enforcement; and many others with nowhere else to turn to find their way into a local ED. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicholas H. Kluesner, Charles J. Holden Source Type: research

Fentanyl-contaminated cocaine outbreak with laboratory confirmation in New York City in 2019
Illicitly manufactured fentanyl and fentanyl analogues (IMFs) are being increasingly suspected in overdose deaths. However, few prior outbreaks have been reported thus far of patients with laboratory-confirmed IMF toxicity after reporting intent to use only nonopioid substances. Herein we report a case series of nine patients without opioid use disorder who presented to two urban emergency departments (EDs) with opioid toxicity after insufflating a substance they believed to be cocaine. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 7, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Philip DiSalvo, Gail Cooper, Jessica Tsao, Michelle Romeo, Larissa K. Laskowski, Gregg Chesney, Mark K. Su Source Type: research

Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, lymphocyte to monocyte ratio and platelet to lymphocyte ratio to predict the severity of COVID-19
In this study, we aimed to investigate and compare the prognostic impacts of C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC) count, neutrophil (NEU)-to-lymphocyte (LYM) ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), Red Cell Distribution Width (RDW) biomarkers in laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases as well as to explore the most useful diagnostic biomarkers and optimal cutoff values in COVID-19 patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Murat Seyit, Esin Avci, Rukiye Nar, Hande Senol, Atakan Yilmaz, Mert Ozen, Alten Oskay, Hulya Aybek Source Type: research

Violence prevention emergency tool (VPET) screening of youth in the pediatric ED
BackgroundViolence is an increasingly common and significant problem for youth worldwide. Youth who rely on treatment at urban EDs are more likely to die as the result of violence than any other disease/condition for which they seek care. The first step in helping youth that are at risk, is identifying them. We developed a 7 –item screening tool called VPET. The purpose of this study is to validate the VPET screening tool in identifying high-risk youth.Methods and findingsWe prospectively enrolled a convenience sample of children during the index ED visit who were called 3 months and 6 months after this visit. (S...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Danielle Chenard, Griffin Stryuck, Sharon Smith, Maua Mosha, Kevin Borrup, Steven C. Rogers Source Type: research

Identifying acute myocardial infarction in ventricular-paced patients: A case report on the effectiveness of modified Sgarbossa criteria
We report a case where application of the Modified Sgarbossa criteria (mSC) would have immediately identified AMI in a patient with a VP and merited strong advocacy for emergent cardiac catheterization.A 94-year-old male with VP presented to the emergency department (ED) after he had burning sensation in his chest. Initial ECG demonstrated>5  mm of discordant ST elevation in leads III and aVF which gave him 2 points per original Sgarbossa Criteria (oSC) and not meeting criteria for activation for cardiac catheterization. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua M. Newson, Nana Sefa, David A. Berger Source Type: research

Antibiotic prescribing for adult bacteriuria and pyuria in community hospital emergency departments
To describe emergency department (ED) antibiotic prescribing for urinary tract infections (UTIs) and asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) and to identify improvement opportunities. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: John J. Veillette, C. Dustin Waters, Stephanie S. Gelman, Lisa Hoopes, George Vargyas, Alyssa McKay, Tatiana Good, Jared Olson, Todd J. Vento Source Type: research

Ocular trauma secondary to exercise resistance bands during the COVID-19 pandemic
To characterize injuries caused by exercise resistance bands. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hasenin Al-khersan, Thomas A. Lazzarini, Anne L. Kunkler, Diana M. Laura, Kenneth C. Fan, Lily Zhang, David W. Redick, Humberto Salazar, Charles M. Medert, Nimesh A. Patel Source Type: research

Increased age, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and white blood cells count are associated with higher COVID-19 mortality
Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) caused by the highly pathogenic SARS-CoV-2, was first reported from Wuhan, China, in December 2019. The present study assessed possible associations between one-month mortality and demographic data, SpO2, underlying diseases and laboratory findings, in COVID-19 patients. Also, since recent studies on COVID-19, have focused on Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) as an independent risk factor of the in-hospital death and a significant prognostic biomarker of outcomes in critically ill patients, in this study, we assessed predictive potential of this factor in terms of one-month mortality. (...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elnaz Vafadar Moradi, Ali Teimouri, Ramin Rezaee, Negar Morovatdar, Mahdi Foroughian, Parvaneh Layegh, Behrang Rezvani Kakhki, Seyed Reza Ahmadi Koupaei, Vahideh Ghorani Source Type: research

Inter- ED transfer for patents with acute large vessel stroke: Efficiency vs thoroughness tradeoff
We thank the authors for their interest and agree that timely intervention for patients with large vessel occlusion (LVO) is associated with improved outcomes. Given the clear importance of timely treatment, the primary exposure we were interested in was the time spent at transferring EDs for patients who were transferred and ultimately received mechanical thrombectomy for LVO. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: MichaelJ. Ward, Michael Froehler, William L. Scheving, Kimberly Hart, Candace D. McNaughton Source Type: research

Lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio predicts mortality in cirrhotic patients with septic shock
Patients with liver cirrhosis and septic shock have a significantly higher risk of mortality and morbidity compared with non-cirrhotic patients. The peripheral blood lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) can determine the prognosis of cirrhotic patients. Our study aimed to investigate the usefulness of LMR as a predictive marker of mortality risk in cirrhotic patients with septic shock. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yin-Chou Hsu, Yong-Ye Yang, I-Ting Tsai Source Type: research

Comparison of sustained rate control in atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular rate: Metoprolol vs. Diltiazem
The objective of this study was to compare sustained rate control with intravenous (IV) diltiazem vs. IV metoprolol in acute treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) with rapid ventricular rate (RVR) in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kristi L. Hargrove, Ellen E. Robinson, Kathleen A. Lusk, Darrel W. Hughes, Luke A. Neff, Amanda L. Fowler Source Type: research

Early, awake proning in emergency department patients with COVID-19
Proning has been shown to improve oxygenation and mortality in certain populations of intubated patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Small observational analyses of COVID-19 patients suggest awake proning may lead to clinical improvement. Data on safety and efficacy is lacking. We sought to describe the effect of proning on oxygenation in nonintubated COVID-19 patients. We also evaluated feasibility, safety, and other physiological and clinical outcomes associated with this intervention. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nicole M. Dubosh, Matthew L. Wong, Anne V. Grossestreuer, Ying K. Loo, Leon D. Sanchez, David Chiu, Evan L. Leventhal, Annette Ilg, Michael W. Donnino Source Type: research

The association between scene time interval and neurologic outcome following adult bystander witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest
To analyze the association between Emergency Medical Services (EMS) scene time interval (STI) and survival with functional neurologic recovery following adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ryan A. Coute, Brian H. Nathanson, Michael C. Kurz, Bryan McNally, Timothy J. Mader, The CARES Surveillance Group Source Type: research

The QR code: A treatment for COVID-19 information overload
One of many challenges created by the COVID-19 pandemic for emergency departments (EDs) is the need for unusually rapid dissemination and uptake of new information by healthcare teams [1]. As our understanding of COVID-19 evolves quickly, it is accompanied by a rapid progression of new procedures and protocols related to infection control strategies, testing indications, admissions policies, and the physical flow of patients in the ED setting. Multiple authors have noted that effective communication to staff is important for preventing burnout and promoting resilience in this type of crisis situation [2,3], and having staf...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua J. Baugh, Rebecca Oran, Ted Roberts, Matthew Hankin, Kevin Moore, Benjamin A. White Source Type: research

The impact of COVID-19 lockdown measures on ED visits in Lebanon
As the COVID-19 pandemic spread globally, emergency departments (ED) around the world began to report significant drops in volumes and changes in disease patterns. During the early COVID-19 period, Lebanon followed an aggressive containment approach to halt the spread of the disease. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dina Mahmassani, Hani Tamim, Maha Makki, Eveline Hitti Source Type: research

Who provides what care? An analysis of clinical focus among the national emergency care workforce
Clinician expertise has been associated with improved patient outcomes, yet ED clinicians often work in various clinical settings beyond the ED and, therefore, may risk expertise by having less clinical focus. We sought to describe clinical focus among the emergency care workforce nationally. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - December 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Cameron J. Gettel, Maureen E. Canavan, Gail D'Onofrio, Brendan G. Carr, Arjun K. Venkatesh Source Type: research