A prospective analysis of time to screen protocol ECGs in adult Emergency Department triage patients
This study investigates the time necessary for Patient Care Technicians (PCTs) to deliver ECGs to ED attendings to confirm automated interpretation. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nadia A. Villarroel, Connor J. Houghton, Shelby C. Mader, Kye E. Poronsky, Ashley L. Deutsch, Timothy J. Mader Source Type: research

Building your emotional bench: How to sustain a career in emergency medicine
Is it possible to train for the eventuality of doubt; the critical self-analysis which occurs after an unsuccessful resuscitation, when dealing with a toxic consultant, or if we simply make a mistake? (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael B. Weinstocka, Mike Pallaci, Annahieta Kalantari Source Type: research

A plunge in the number of traumatic traffic injuries in an emergency Center in Anhui Province, China
Letter to the Editor. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Wanbo Zhu, Jiazhao Yang, Lei Xu, Shiyuan Fang Source Type: research

The prognostic value of immature granulocyte in patients with acute pancreatitis
In this study, we aimed to investigate the percentage of immature granulocyte (IG %) in patients with acute pancreatitis in order to predict the severity of the disease and in-hospital mortality. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Serkan Karakulak, H üseyin Narcı, Cüneyt Ayrık, Semra Erdoğan, Enver Üçbilek Source Type: research

Evaluation and management of the critically ill adult asthmatic in the emergency department setting
Asthma is a common reason for presentation to the Emergency Department and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. While patients may have a relatively benign course, there is a subset of patients who present in a critical state and require emergent management. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brit Long, Skyler Lentz, Alex Koyfman, Michael Gottlieb Source Type: research

Is ketamine sedation without local anesthesia sufficient for pediatric laceration repair? A double-blind randomized clinical trial
The objective of this study was to evaluate whether sedation with ketamine without local anesthesia was sufficient in children undergoing primary repair. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hyuksool Kwon, Jin Hee Lee, Yoo Jin Choi, Jae Yun Jung Source Type: research

Narrowing the gap between efficacy and effectiveness using the TIDieR checklist
In this issue of the American Journal of Emergency Medicine, Fladie et al. describe the completeness of reporting in a large random sample of 233 randomized interventional trials in the emergency medicine literature [1]. Each trial was assessed using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist which includes various informational items such as intervention delivery, procedures, information about the materials, any study modifications, and adherence assessment methods and outcomes [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jesse M. Pines Source Type: research

Video capsule endoscopy for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in the emergency department: A systematic review and meta-analysis
The assessment of the severity of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in emergency department (ED) patients is difficult to assess with commonly available diagnostic tools. Small studies have shown that video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a promising risk-stratification method and may be better than current clinical decision rules such as the Rockall score and the Glasgow Blatchford score. This review aims to assess the accuracy of VCE to detect active upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage compared to a reference standard. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nidhi Shah, Chen Chen, Nataly Montano, David Cave, Rebecca Siegel, Nina T. Gentile, Alexander T. Limkakeng, Anita B. Kumar, Yan Ma, Andrew C. Meltzer Source Type: research

Interventions to improve older adults' Emergency Department patient experience: A systematic review
To summarize interventions that impact the experience of older adults in the emergency department (ED) as measured by patient experience instruments. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michelle J. Berning, Lucas Oliveira J. e Silva, Nataly Espinoza Suarez, Laura E. Walker, Patricia Erwin, Christopher R. Carpenter, Fernanda Bellolio Source Type: research

Is caval index an appropriate tool for predicting hypovolemia in stroke
We have read with interest the recent article, “Challenge of Intravascular Volume Assessment in Acute Ischemic Stroke” by Miller J.B. et al. [1]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Engin Ozakin, Kadir Ugur Mert Source Type: research

Hemophagocytic syndrome with severe sepsis caused by Capnocytophaga canimorsus
Capnocytophaga canimorsus, commonly transmitted by dog bites, can cause severe sepsis, and the mortality rate is very high. We experienced a case of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) complicated by severe sepsis caused by C. canimorsus. A 58-year-old man with no remarkable medical history was admitted to another hospital with fever and mild consciousness disorder developed 3  days after being bitten by his dog. The next day, the patient developed disseminated intravascular coagulation and shock and was transferred to our emergency medical center. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shinya Terashima, Koichi Hayakawa, Fukuki Saito, Daiki Wada, Hiromu Iwamura, Atsuyuki Kuro, Yujiro Ozaki, Yasushi Nakamori, Kazuyoshi Ishi, Yasuyuki Kuwagawa Source Type: research

Hemorrhagic pancreatic pseudocyst: A rare complication
Pancreatic pseudocysts are seen both in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Prevalence of pancreatic pseudocyst in chronic pancreatitis is 20% to 40% and is most commonly seen in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Intracystic hemorrhage from a pseudoaneurysm is a rare and potentially a lethal complication of pancreatic pseudocyst with an incidence of less than 10%. We herein present a case of a 42-year-old male with a past medical history of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, stable pseudocyst in the tail of pancreas, alcohol abuse and seizures who presented with abdominal pain and acute anemia had this rare complication of hemorrha...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Pujitha Kudaravalli, Nikita Garg, Venkata Satish Pendela, Harvir Singh Gambhir Source Type: research

Impact of changing the admission process of patients with pneumonia on the length of stay in the emergency department
Timely specialist consultations are indispensable for safe, high-quality care for patients in the emergency department (ED). However, consultation delays can affect patient flow and contribute to prolonged length of stay (LOS) in the ED, which in turn leads to ED overcrowding [1-3]. Prolonged LOS and overcrowding in the ED could be connected not only to patient dissatisfaction and compromised emergent care but also to increased patient mortality [4-6]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seung Baik Han, Ji Hye Kim, Yu Jin Lee, Areum Durey Source Type: research

The effects of a morphine shortage on emergency department pain control
In 2018, due to a national morphine shortage, our two study emergency departments (EDs) were unable to administer intravenous (IV) morphine for over six months. We evaluated the effects of this shortage on analgesia and patient disposition. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ellen Kettler, Jesse Brennan, Christopher Coyne Source Type: research

The relationship between staff teaming models and emergency department efficiency
Effective medical teamwork has been shown to improve quality of care, patient satisfaction, and work environment [1-3]. However, few studies have measured the effect of teamwork on objective metrics such as emergency department (ED) patient flow and LOS [4]. Currently there are several staff teaming models utilized in EDs. As these departments have unique number and type of providers, physical layout, and core missions (particularly regarding education), no staff teaming model has been universally adopted. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Khalid N. Almulhim, Robert Shesser, Ali Pourmand, Tess Whiteside, Erin Kane Source Type: research

Early short-term prediction of emergency department length of stay using natural language processing for low-acuity outpatients
Low-acuity outpatients constitute the majority of emergency department (ED) patients, and these patients often experience an unpredictable length of stay (LOS). Effective LOS prediction might improve the quality of ED care and reduce ED crowding. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Chien-Hua Chen, Jer-Guang Hsieh, Shu-Ling Cheng, Yih-Lon Lin, Po-Hsiang Lin, Jyh-Horng Jeng Source Type: research

Assessment of primary outcome measures for a clinical trial of pediatric hemorrhagic injuries
We evaluated the acceptability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) and other outcomes as the primary outcomes for a pediatric hemorrhagic trauma trial (TIC-TOC) among clinicians. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel K. Nishijima, Melissa Gosdin, Hiba Naz, Daniel J. Tancredi, Hilary A. Hewes, Sage R. Myers, Rachel M. Stanley, P. David Adelson, Randall S. Burd, Yaron Finkelstein, John VanBuren, T. Charles Casper, Nathan Kuppermann, the TIC-TOC Collaborators of t Source Type: research

Aeromedical helicopter transport of prisoners: The Mexico City experience
Helicopter medical transport of prisoner patients has unique logistical and medical challenges, as well as potential risks to healthcare providers. Prisoners have specific requirements for safe transport, and it is of paramount importance to know the variables related to transport related mortality since most prisoners that need air evacuation are critically ill. Because we understand that there is a potentially dangerous nature of transport of this population, and because of the unique nature of them, we aimed to provide a detailed insight on predictors of outcome in prisoners who were injured as a result of trauma and th...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Emmanuel Urquieta, Alexa Bello, Daryelle Samantha Varon, Joseph Varon Source Type: research

Sex-based pharmacotherapy in acute care setting, a narrative review for emergency providers
Sex-based medicine, which can be defined as the process of understanding the inherent differences in disease pathophysiology and response to medications that exist between the sexes, seems like a necessary step in the movement towards personalized medicine. While there are strict guidelines for weight-based dosage of pediatric medications, similar guidelines do not exist for the treatment of adults, despite prominent biologic differences between the sexes. The lack of individualization is of particular importance in the treatment of adult patients in the emergency department (ED), because it can determine the trajectory of...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nikita Mehta, Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Caroline Schulman, Francis O ’Connell, Ali Pourmand Source Type: research

Oncologic emergencies in the emergency medicine residency curriculum: A national survey
In the United States, cancer is the second most common cause of death in individuals older than 45  years of age [1]. There is no clear description of the incidence of oncologic presentations to emergency departments (ED), probably due to variability between cancer centers and general hospitals, underreporting of suspicion of cancer, and patients with limited healthcare access presenting prefer entially to EDs. However, cancer patients consume more resources and have higher admission rates [2]. Additionally, the relative proportion of oncologic ED visits is expected to rise given the increasing incidence of cancer, impro...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: E. Rajha, M.T. Pillow, P.A. Brock, S. Jenks Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Thoracic vertebrae fracture: Is it an indicator of abdominal injury?
Traumatic vertebral fracture accounts for 10 –15% of trauma related admissions. While the correlation between lumbar vertebral fractures and abdominal injuries is well established, the relationship between thoracic vertebral fractures (TVF) and abdominal injuries is comparatively less well elucidated. Using a large national trauma database, we aimed to examine the incidence and severity of associated abdominal injuries in blunt trauma patients suffering from TVF. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Y. Hershkovitz, D. Sheffer, K. Peleg, Kessel Boris, J.J. Dubose, I. Jeroukhimov, A. Givon, M. Dudkiewicz, ITG, D. Aranovich Source Type: research

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in television medical dramas: Results of the TVMD2 study
Television medical dramas (TVMDs) use cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as a mean of achieving higher viewing rates. TVMDs portrayal of CPR can be used to teach laypersons attempting to perform CPR and to form a shared professional and layperson mental model for CPR decisions. We studied the portrayal of CPR across a wide range of TVMDs to see whether newer series fulfill this promise. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Luz Ramirez, Jose Diaz, Abbas Alshami, Daryelle S. Varon, Sharon Einav, Salim Surani, Joseph Varon Source Type: research

The authors respond: Ultrasound assessment in pulmonary hypertension
We thank the authors for these clinically important observations relating to the management of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tim Montrief, Rachel E. Bridwell, Alex Koyfman, Erica Simon, Brit Long Source Type: research

Dissecting aneurysm as a differential diagnosis for subcutaneous emphysema
When subcutaneous emphysema occurs as a complication of a painful tooth extraction [1] the differential diagnosis should include dissecting aneurysm of the aorta (DAA). The rationale is that severe pain is capable, not only of generating high trans pulmonary pressure, thereby causing subcutaneous emphysema [1], but also capable of generating an abrupt rise in blood pressure (BP) [2]. An abrupt increase in BP can, in turn, precipitate DAA in various contexts such as recreational drug abuse [3,4] and sexual arousal [5], and, arguably, also after painful tooth extraction. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

A letter to the editor: Evaluation and management of pulmonary hypertension in the emergency department setting
We read with great interest the review article “Evaluation and management of pulmonary hypertension in the emergency department setting” by Simon et al. [1]. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is still an unclear issue in the field of emergency medicine. Even in patients with pulmonary and/or cardiac complaints, it is often not among the diagnoses that come to mind, although it contributes to the morbidity and mortality. Therefore, as in this review, papers on this topic are very valuable. However, we think that there are serious mistakes related to ultrasonographic imaging in this article. (Source: The American Journ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mehmet Ali ASLANER, Adnan Yamano ğlu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

One million screened: Scaling up SBIRT and buprenorphine treatment in hospital emergency departments across Maryland
Identification of problematic alcohol use and substance use in the population has been a clinical challenge, especially during the heightened years of the opioid epidemic. Bringing Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) to scale in medical settings, such as hospital emergency departments (EDs) could facilitate broad identification of substance use disorders, timely delivery of brief interventions, and successful linkages to treatment. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Laura B. Monico, Marla Oros, Sadie Smith, Shannon Gwin Mitchell, Jan Gryczynski, Robert Schwartz Source Type: research

Response: Ultrasound assessment in pulmonary hypertension
We thank the authors for these clinically important observations relating to the management of pulmonary hypertension (PH) in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tim Montrief, Rachel E. Bridwell, Alex Koyfman, Erica Simon, Brit Long Source Type: research

A change of heart: Transformation of the electrocardiogram in a patient with apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
An asymptomatic 83-year-old man with a history of hypertension, prior stroke with no residual deficits, and bilateral carotid artery stenosis, presented for evaluation prior to cataract surgery. His transthoracic echocardiogram was typical for apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (AHCM), and his electrocardiograms (ECG) showed large precordial R-waves and inverted T-waves, previously associated with AHCM, while his ECG 7  years earlier was normal. Mechanistic explanations for the developed ECG abnormalities, and their importance for the detection and monitoring of patients with AHCM are provided. (Source: The American Jour...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Benjamin Gold, John Madias Source Type: research

Nontraumatic lung herniation: A case report
The patient was a 67  year old morbidly obese Caucasian male with a previous history of COPD, asthma, and sleep apnea who was on maintenance oxygen at 2 L by nasal cannula. During one particularly violent episode of coughing his family heard a popping sound and he had the onset of right chest pain. On arrival, he ap peared short of breath and on exam a large area of ecchymosis was noted over the right chest wall. Although somewhat difficult to appreciate secondary to the patient's body habitus, the area appeared to increase in size with inspiration. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Paul Butts Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Toc
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Info for authors
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - March 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

The authors respond: Studying prehospital supplemental oxygen in acute stroke
We appreciate the opportunity to respond to this letter and thank you to the author for taking time to raise these important issues regarding the potential role of prehospital supplemental oxygen (sO2) for stroke. This is an area that needs additional – including prospective – studies to better understand the potential benefits and harms of sO2 for acute stroke. In this retrospective cohort study, the Get with the Guidelines-Stroke (GWTG-S) database was used to identify adult acute stroke patients who presented to an academic Comprehensive St roke Center via EMS between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2017. (S...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Post-traumatic left anterior descending artery dissection
Patients who experience trauma, particularly thoracic trauma, may be at risk for missed cardiac injury. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lexis T. Laubach, Glenn A. Burket, Robert D. Barraco, Dzanan Ramic, Kevin R. Weaver, Marna Rayl Greenberg Source Type: research

Comparison of the CAD consortium and updated Diamond-Forrester scores for predicting obstructive coronary artery disease
Current guidelines recommend the use of the updated Diamond –Forrester (DF) method and Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) Consortium models to assess the pretest probability of obstructive CAD. The present study aimed to compare the performance of these models among patients with chest pain evaluated in an emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Un Woo Lee, Shin Ahn, Yo Sep Shin, Youn-Jung Kim, Seung Mok Ryoo, Chang Hwan Sohn, Won Young Kim, Sang-Hun Lee Source Type: research

Absence of QT prolongation after administration of a 24-mg bimodal-release ondansetron pill (RHB-102)
Prospective data evaluating the effect of ondansetron on the corrected QT (QTc) interval is lacking in emergency department clinical use. As part of a randomized trial of a 24-mg bimodal-release ondansetron (RHB-102) pill, we tested the effect of RHB-102 compared to placebo on QTc change. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph Miller, Stacey House, Luis Lovato, Andrew Meltzer, Barry Hahn, Jahn Avarello, Terry Plasse, Ira Kalfus, Reza Fathi, Robert Silverman Source Type: research

Complications in STEMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction) due to BMI (Body Mass Index)
Obesity is an independent risk factor for hypertension, diabetes, pulmonary hypertension, and dyslipidemia [1]. Any of these risk factors increase cardiovascular risk for ST segment myocardial infarctions (STEMI). In conjunction with obesity, this increases the patient's risk for STEMI [2,3]. Obesity also impacts patients with STEMI, in terms of presentation, treatment, in-hospital outcomes and the morbidity and long-term mortality in patients undergoing vascular surgeries [2-7]. Examining PTCI outcomes of extremely obese patients (Body Mass Index (BMI)  > 40 kg/m2) indicated they were more likely to be younger (6...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: D.O. Douglas McDonald, D.O. Alisha Wright, Cindy Schmidt Source Type: research

Implementation of an ED-based bundled mechanical ventilation protocol improves adherence to lung-protective ventilation
Mechanical ventilation is a common life-saving protocol, but it has also been linked to ventilator-associated lung injury (VALI), a progressive injury caused by positive pressure ventilation [1]. Despite decades of research, lung-protective ventilation (LPV) with low tidal volume (VT) remains one of the few effective protocols for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) [2-5]. Growing evidence suggests that low VT may also benefit critically ill patients without pre-existing lung injury [6-11]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 25, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tyler M. Foley, Brittany A. Philpot, Alysa S. Davis, Morgan B. Swanson, Karisa K. Harland, Justin D. Kuhn, Brian M. Fuller, Nicholas M. Mohr Source Type: research

Initial creatine kinase level as predictor for delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae associated with acute carbon monoxide poisoning
In this study, we aimed to investigate the optimal cut-off value for creatine kinase level to predict DNS. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 25, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Heekyung Lee, Hyunggoo Kang, Byuk Sung Ko, Jaehoon Oh, Tae Ho Lim, Yongil Cho Source Type: research

Resource utilization across the continuum of HIV care: An emergency department-based cohort study
The objective of this study was to determine the healthcare resource utilization for people living with HIV (PLWH) presenting to the emergency department (ED) across the HIV Care Continuum. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Abia Abia, Richard E. Rothman, Amir M. Mohareb, Grace Li Hsien Lim, Anuj V. Patel, Benjamin Bigelow, Eili Y. Klein, Gai Cole, Kelly A. Gebo, Richard D. Moore, Yu-Hsiang Hsieh Source Type: research

Predictors of clinically relevant differences between noninvasive versus arterial blood pressure
Blood pressure (BP) measurements are important for managing patients with hypertensive emergencies (HE). Previous studies showed that there was significant difference between IABP and NIBP but no information whether these differences changed management. Our study investigated the factors associated with the differences affecting BP management of patients with HE. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alison Raffman, Umang Shah, Jackson F. Barr, Soha Hassan, Lesley U. Azike, Saman Tanveer, Suzanne Bracklow, Brandon Parker, Daniel J. Haase, Quincy K. Tran Source Type: research

Utility of the blood urea nitrogen to serum albumin ratio as a prognostic factor of mortality in aspiration pneumonia patients
This study aimed to determine whether the blood urea nitrogen to serum albumin (B/A) ratio is a useful prognostic factor of mortality in patients with aspiration pneumonia. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seung Ryu, Se kwang Oh, Sung Uk Cho, Yeonho You, Jung Soo Park, Jin Hong Min, Wonjoon Jeong, Yong chul Cho, Hong Joon Ahn, Changshin Kang Source Type: research

Risk factors associated with intracranial bleeding and neurosurgery in patients with mild traumatic brain injury who are receiving direct oral anticoagulants
The established clinical risk factors for post-traumatic intracranial bleeding have not been evaluated in patients receiving DOACs yet. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gianni Turcato, Arian Zaboli, Massimo Zannoni, Giorgio Ricci, Elisabetta Zorzi, Laura Ciccariello, Andrea Tenci, Norbert Pfeifer, Antonio Maccagnani, Antonio Bonora Source Type: research

Glasgow Coma Scale is a better delayed neurological sequelae risk factor than neurological examination abnormalities in carbon monoxide poisoning
We have read the article by Sari Dogan et al. with great interest recently published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine [1]. The authors demonstrated that abnormalities in the initial neurological examination (NE) were a significant predictive factor for delayed neurological sequelae (DNS) in carbon monoxide poisoning (COP). However, neurological examination abnormalities (NEA) which included altered mental status, headache, low GCS score ( (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ping Xu, Yushu Wang, Linghong Cao, Wenbin Huang, Jianjun Zhang, Xia Gao, Cong Lin Source Type: research

Is prehospital supplemental oxygen effective for acute stroke?
Dr. Dylla and colleagues [1] performed a well-conducted cohort study concerning the efficacy and safety of prehospital supplemental oxygen for acute stroke. Despite the essential information provided, several issues must be resolved to draw confirmed conclusions. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kai Zhang Source Type: research

Hallway bed status is associated with lower patient satisfaction
Overcrowding has been reported in Emergency Medicine literature for decades and has demonstrated a negative impact on adverse events including mortality, quality of care, elopement, return to the emergency department (ED), medical errors, and timeliness of patient care [1-3]. As a result of ED volumes exceeding ED bed capacity, patients are being cared for in hallways outside of conventional rooms. Of the few studies that exist on patient satisfaction related to ED overcrowding and hallway bed use, the sample sizes were relatively small or they measured only satisfaction on those who were admitted [4-6]. (Source: The Ameri...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David M. Richardson, Ali R. Yazdanyar, Kathryn B. Bartlett, Akshay Gupta, Max W. Needham, Jennifer Sadowski, John J. Scholz, Jeanne L. Jacoby, Bryan G. Kane, Marna Rayl Greenberg Source Type: research

The prediction levels of emergency clinicians about the outcome of the ambulance patients and outpatients
In this study, we aimed to determine the prediction levels of emergency clinicians according to working year on the outcome of the ambulance patients and outpatients presented to the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mustafa Çalis, Kemal Sener, Adem Kaya, Sezai Sari, Mustafa Polat, Sadiye Yolcu Source Type: research

Mometasone furoate for children with asthma: A meta-analysis
Mometasone furoate shows some potential in treating paediatric asthma. We conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of mometasone furoate for paediatric asthma. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jing Lei, Songdong Ma Source Type: research

A prospective cross-sectional study examining the documented evaluation of patients at high risk for mild traumatic brain injury
This study was done to determine the proportion of patients, who were considered high risk for an mTBI, that had documentation of an mTBI evaluation. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 22, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: C. Christopher Zalesky, Tim P. Moran, Rachel R. Koval, Jasmine Usher, Jonathan J. Ratcliff, Daniel Wu, David W. Wright Source Type: research

Female millennial patient perspectives in the emergency department: A qualitative analysis
For many patients, the emergency department (ED) represents their first interaction with a hospital system, so establishing positive first impressions is especially important [1]. Patients satisfied with their care are more likely to return to the healthcare institution in the future, remain more compliant with medical regimens and attend follow-up appointments, thus improving the patient's treatment goals and clinical outcomes [2]. In recent years, patient satisfaction has been tied to reimbursements, incentivizing health systems to address this area [3-5]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elizabeth Upton, Rohit B. Sangal, Erik Blutinger, Mary Khachatryan, Mira Mamtani, Jaya Aysola Source Type: research