Does a phone-based meditation application improve mental wellness in emergency medicine personnel?
Burnout is a persistent concern in healthcare, particularly among emergency medicine (EM) physicians, nurses and advanced practice providers [1-4]. Meditation and mindfulness activities have been shown to decrease burnout, depression, and anxiety among healthcare workers [5-8], and multiple free phone-based applications now offer a convenient means to participate in mindfulness activities [9]. However, few studies have evaluated their effectiveness among healthcare professionals, and there have been no EM-specific studies. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 22, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Keith G. Lambert, William R. Aufricht, Dawn Mudie, Lawrence H. Brown Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

The prognostic value of routine coagulation tests for patients with heat stroke
To evaluate the prognostic value of routine coagulation tests for patients with heat stroke. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 22, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ling Xing, Shu-Yuan Liu, Han-Ding Mao, Kai-Guo Zhou, Qing Song, Qiu-Mei Cao Source Type: research

COVID-19: New York City pandemic notes from the first 30  days
The COVID-19 pandemic has evoked dramatic global disruption as health and governmental agencies struggle to manage this historic medical event. As of April 4, 2020, over 200 countries and territories have been affected, with over 1,000,000 cases and 60,000 deaths worldwide [1]. The United States currently is the country with the highest prevalence of COVID-19 cases, with New York City (NYC) serving as the epicenter of this pandemic [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stefan Flores, Nicholas Gavin, Marie-Laure Romney, Christopher Tedeschi, Erica Olsen, Anisa Heravian, Liliya Abrukin, David Kessler, Angela M. Mills, Bernard P. Chang Source Type: research

Comparison of efficacy nebulized fentanyl with intravenous ketorolac for renal colic in patients over 12  years old
Acute renal colic is one of the common causes of referral to the hospitals. The aim of this study is to compare the efficacy of nebulized fentanyl with that of intravenous ketorolac in renal colic patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Bareza Rezaei, Rasoul Salimi, Alireza Kalantari, Peyman Astaraki Source Type: research

The precaution must be taken to rule out acute aortic dissection
Notwithstanding the high success rate of intravenous nitrate infusions as a strategy in the management of acute failure attributable to hypertension [1] care must be taken to rule out the diagnosis of acute aortic dissection (AAD) presenting with the association of hypertension and acute heart failure [2-4]. In these three patients, aged 25, 44,and 78, respectively, corresponding blood pressures were 210/135  mmHg, 183/99 mmHg, and 202/112 mmHg, respectively. The murmur of aortic regurgitation was an associated feature in the first two patients, one of whom also had an electrocardiogram showing ST segment elevation i...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

COVID-19: New York City pandemic notes from the first 30  days
The COVID-19 pandemic has evoked dramatic global disruption as health and governmental agencies struggle to manage this historic medical event. As of April 4, 2020, over 200 countries and territories have been affected, with over 1,000,000 cases and 60,000 deaths worldwide [1]. The United States currently is the country with the highest prevalence of COVID-19 cases, with New York City (NYC) serving as the epicenter of this pandemic [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stefan Flores, Nicholas Gavin, Marie-Laure Romney, Christopher Tedeschi, Erica Olsen, Anisa Heravian, Liliya Abrukin, David Kessler, Angela M. Mills, Bernard P. Chang Source Type: research

Death from cardiac glycoside “pong-pong” following use as weight-loss supplement purchased on Internet
We present a case of a 33-year-old female presenting with lethargy, vomiting, bradyc ardia, severe hyperkalemia of 8.9 mEq/L, slow atrial fibrillation followed by cardiovascular collapse following the ingestion of “pong-pong”, the kernel of Cerbera odollam, as a weight loss supplement. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sean Patrick Nordt, Matt Hendrickson, Kimberly Won, Matthew J. Miller, Stuart P. Swadron, F. Lee Cantrell Source Type: research

Patterns of transaminase elevation in rhabdomyolysis versus acetaminophen toxicity
Transaminase elevations can occur from liver injury or in the setting of rhabdomyolysis. The goal of this study is to evaluate indices that could differentiate acetaminophen toxicity from muscle injury in the setting of transaminase elevations. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kevin F. Maskell, Scott W. Powell, Deanna Willis, Victoria Okhomina, Adam P. Sima, Brandon K. Wills Source Type: research

Creating a COVID-19 surge clinic to offload the emergency department
The spread of COVID-19 has strained or overwhelmed emergency department (ED) capacity across the world. Facing an emerging COVID-19 outbreak in our city, we feared that the same situation could overwhelm our ED resources [1]. Therefore, we sought to create an area adjacent to our existing ED where patients not requiring emergency level care could be evaluated, tested for COVID-19, and safely discharged home. Here, we describe the creation and operation of a Surge Clinic in our indoor ambulance bay. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 20, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua J. Baugh, Brian J. Yun, Eileen Searle, Angela Chyn, Jean M. Berhnardt, Kaitlyn LeClair, Lara Henshaw-Archer, Michelle M. L'Heureux, Ali S. Raja, Inga T. Lennes, Paul D. Biddinger Source Type: research

Cardiac injury is associated with mortality and critically ill pneumonia in COVID-19: A meta-analysis
In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to explore the association between cardiac injury and mortality, the need for intensive care unit (ICU) care, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anwar Santoso, Raymond Pranata, Arief Wibowo, Makhyan Jibril Al-Farabi, Ian Huang, Budhi Antariksa Source Type: research

Early chest computed tomography to diagnose COVID-19 from suspected patients: A multicenter retrospective study
The purpose of this study was to distinguish the imaging features of COVID-19 from those of other chest infectious diseases and evaluate the diagnostic value of chest CT for suspected COVID-19 patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Congliang Miao, Mengdi Jin, Li Miao, Xinying Yang, Peng Huang, Huanwen Xiong, Peijie Huang, Qi Zhao, Jiang Du, Jiang Hong Source Type: research

Adherence to PECARN criteria in children transferred to a pediatric trauma center: An opportunity for improvement?
The Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) criteria identify children at low risk of clinically important traumatic brain injury (ciTBI) in whom CT head (CTH) is unnecessary. We assessed compliance with PECARN at outside hospitals (OSH) among children transferred to our pediatric trauma center. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Pennell, Tyler Wilson, Madeleine Bruce, Adam Dykie, L. Grier Arthur, Erika Lindholm, Sean Ciullo Source Type: research

The role of emergency medical services in containing COVID-19
The number of worldwide cases of COVID-19 has exceeded one million. The approach of the World Health Organization has emphasized the role of containment of the virus [1] in the context of countrywide operational planning [2]. Emergency medical services (EMS) can play a significant role in designing and implementing an effective approach. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Eli Jaffe, Refael Strugo, Eli Bin, Oren Blustein, Ido Rosenblat, Evan Avraham Alpert, Roman Sonkin Source Type: research

iPad deployment for virtual evaluation in the emergency department during the COVID-19 pandemic
Emergency Medicine clinicians are rapidly adapting to new ways of operating and delivering care in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic and limited personal protective equipment (PPE) availability [1]. At our hospital, a quaternary care academic and level one trauma center, we explored digital care delivery methods to reduce unnecessary exposure and conserve PPE. One method involved the deployment of iPads to evaluate and manage patients using a HIPAA-compliant virtual video and voice application. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kelley A. Wittbold, Joshua J. Baugh, Brian J. Yun, Ali S. Raja, Benjamin A. White Source Type: research

The day after COVID-19
Death tolls are rising, in most of the world this viral infection is rampant. Emergency departments are overwhelmed; we can't find a mask or a gown to protect ourselves. We heard that in China they brought in 40,000 healthcare workers in complete protective gear to bail out Wuhan and none of this back up crew became infected with the virus. We see the patients with heart attacks and strokes that can't get treated because the patient next to them is sicker with COVID 19 and can't breathe. We realize that there aren't enough ventilators to support each breathless patient that comes in. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shamai A. Grossman Source Type: research

Acrylic window as physical barrier for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) conservation
As COVID-19 cases increase, the global supply of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is becoming insufficient, particularly for medical masks and respirators followed closely by gowns and googles. The World Health Organization (WHO) released in February 2020 an interim guidance [1] on the rational use of PPE for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The guidance state that to minimize the need for PPE, WHO recommends the “use of physical barriers to reduce exposure to the COVID-19 virus such as glass or plastic windows.” (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Connie C.R. Gan, Tseng Yu-Chi, Kuan-I Lee Source Type: research

Persistent hiccups as an atypical presenting complaint of COVID-19
Hiccups (singultus) are reflex inspiratory movements that involve the swallowing reflex arc and can be classified as acute (48  h). A 62-year-old man with no history of malignancy or pulmonary disease presented to the Emergency Department with a four-day history of persistent hiccups. Other than episodic hiccupping, his physical examination was otherwise unremarkable. An abnormal chest X-ray led to a CT scan of the chest with IV contrast, which demonstrated regional, peripheral groundglass opacities of the upper lobes with small focal groundglass opacities scattered throughout the lungs. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Garrett Prince, Michelle Sergel Source Type: research

Cardiovascular complications in COVID-19
The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2). While systemic inflammation and pulmonary complications can result in significant morbidity and mortality, cardiovascular complications may also occur. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brit Long, William J. Brady, Alex Koyfman, Michael Gottlieb Source Type: research

Inflight management of pneumothorax - Is there a doctor on the plane?
Medical emergencies on board are on the rise and attributed to an increase in commercial air traffic with an ambulant ageing general population with an occult or overt medical condition. Moreover, travellers with respiratory diseases are susceptible to in-flight events due to lower atmospheric pressure in a pressurized cabin which not only predisposes to hypoxemia but also pneumothorax as a result of gas expansion within enclosed pulmonary parenchymal spaces based on Boyle's law [1]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Subramanian Senthilkumaran, Murugan Koushik, Ponniah Thirumalaikolundusubramanian Source Type: research

Comparison of non-invasive CPAP with mask use in carbon monoxide poisoning
Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the major causes of poisoning worldwide. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) use in CO poisoning. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kas ım Turgut, Erdal Yavuz Source Type: research

Protecting our healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic
Currently, there are 1.2 million physician Healthcare Workers (HCWs) in the United States (US), 20% over the age of 55 [2]. Similarly, in the hospital setting, there are 2 million registered nurses, with 22% are over the age of 55 and of the 1.2 million registered nurses employed outside of the hospital, 29% are over the age of 55 [1]. According to the CDC, older adults are at higher risk of infection and complications related to COVID-19, particularly those over the age of 65, the age group that currently comprises 8 out of 10 US deaths from COVID 19 [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Haley Ehrlich, Mark McKenney, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

Pediatric perampanel poisoning
Perampanel is an anticonvulsant that was initially approved in 2012 as adjunct therapy for patients 12  years and older with partial-onset seizures with or without secondarily generalized seizures [1]. It has since been approved as monotherapy for partial onset seizures and its use expanded to include pediatric patients 4 years and older [2]. It is a non-competitive alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl -4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptor antagonist [1]. Currently, the published overdose information available involves only adults [3-7]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mariam Qozi, F. Lee Cantrell Source Type: research

Colocolic intussusception secondary to submucosal lipoma
We report a case of chronic colocolic intussusception secondary to a lead point submucosal lipoma. Dedifferentiating intussusception with or without a lead point is important in determining appropriate management. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Isaac Boyack, David Vu, Pratik Patel, Oleg Opsha Source Type: research

A foreign body in the blood vessel: A diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma
Foreign body(FB) in soft tissue is a common injury in trauma, but it is rare for FB to enter the blood vessel. Typical causes of intravascular FB include iatrogenic and non-iatrogenic factors.A 65-year-old Chinese worker's left hand was hit by two colliding metal blocks while operating a machine tool. Then, he referred to our hospital's emergency department of orthopedics. The X-rays showed that metal FB could be seen in trapezium bone regions of the left hand. During the operation, the FB was found in the cephalic vein of his left hand, so the FB was removed by surgery. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Congpeng Meng, Yao Hu, Shuming Ye, Zhechen Gao, Juehua Jing Source Type: research

Areas of academic research with the impact of COVID-19
Coronavirus (COVID-19) endemic is growing exponentially in the whole world. Researchers, technologists, doctors and other healthcare workers are working day and night on the development of vaccine and medicinesto control and treat this virus. SARS-CoV-2 is the name of the virus responsible for causing COVID-19 disease, which is highly infectious and lethal.With exponentially increasing infections, proportionate fatalities are being reported both from developed and under developed countries. As of today, more than one million people across the world have been reported infected with this virus, and more than 65,000 people ha...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Abid Haleem, Mohd Javaid, Raju Vaishya, S.G. Deshmukh Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Why India needs to extend the nationwide lockdown
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has afflicted almost the entire world. China and Italy have been some of the worst hit while the first world economic superpowers like United States of America and United Kingdom have had an onerous load on their respective healthcare systems. On January 30, 2020 India became part of this global carnage with the first COVID diagnosis [1]. The numbers have risen steadily since then, albeit at an alarming rate in the final days of March. Aiming to control community transmission, the Indian government took the step of declaring a 21  day nationwide lockdown starting on March 24th [1]. (Source: ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ishan Lamba Source Type: research

The use of personal protective equipment in the COVID-19 pandemic era
In the times of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, particular attention should be paid to personal protective equipment (PPE). Medical personnel protection is of particular importance because of the risk of infecting other members of medical teams, including not only physicians, nurses or paramedics, but also other support personnel necessary to maintain the continuity of care for patients [1,2]. Medical personnel protection is a priority as in their case, infection or even the need for quarantine may pose a real threat to patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jacek Smereka, Lukasz Szarpak Source Type: research

Association of Bartholin cysts and abscesses and sexually transmitted infections
Bartholin gland cysts or abscesses account for many gynecologic visits in the emergency department (ED). Previous smaller studies have suggested a link between Bartholin cysts/abscesses and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but few studies have involved the ED. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin M. Elkins, Osman S. Hamid, Leslie V. Simon, Johnathan M. Sheele Source Type: research

Preserving mental health and resilience in frontline healthcare workers during COVID-19
At a normal time, 50% of physicians are battling burnout, or emotional fatigue caused by work related stress [1]. Physician mental health was a reticent, widespread public health crisis prior to COVID-19. Now, healthcare workers are fighting a lethal virus with PPE shortages and no evidence based treatment. Where does that leave the mental state of our healthcare workers? (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kristen Santarone, Mark McKenney, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

Adaption of the emergency department decontamination room for airway management during COVID-19
On December 31, 2019 the first cluster of cases of pneumonia was reported in Wuhan, China later confirmed to be due to the novel coronavirus 2019-nCoV [1]. The first case in the United States was reported on January 20, 2020 [2]. In early March 2020, our hospital took care of one of its first COVID-19 patient. It was during this time that we also had our first COVID positive cardiac arrest. Given good communication from the patient's family to the public safety answering point, appropriate warning was provided to the emergency medical services (EMS). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher S. Sampson Source Type: research

Redesigning emergency department operations amidst a viral pandemic
As shown by the current COVID-19 pandemic, emergency departments (ED) are the front line for hospital-and-community-based care during viral respiratory disease outbreaks. As such, EDs must be able to reorganize and reformat operations to meet the changing needs and staggering patient volume. This paper addresses ways to adapt departmental operations to better manage in times of elevated disease burden, specifically identifying areas of intervention to help limit crowding and spread. Using experience from past outbreaks and the current COVID-19 pandemic, we advise strategies to increase surge capacity and limit patient infl...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tess Whiteside, Erin Kane, Bandar Aljohani, Marya Alsamman, Ali Pourmand Source Type: research

Pharmacotherapy in COVID-19; A narrative review for emergency providers
The COVID-19 pandemic has been particularly challenging due to a lack of established therapies and treatment guidelines. With the rapid transmission of disease, even the off-label use of available therapies has been impeded by limited availability. Several antivirals, antimalarials, and biologics are being considered for treatment at this time. The purpose of this literature review is to synthesize the available information regarding treatment options for COVID-19 and serve as a resource for health care professionals. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nikita Mehta, Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Nour Alkindi, Ali Pourmand Tags: Reviews Source Type: research

An analysis of patients with acute aortic dissection who were transported by physician-staffed helicopter
The present study aimed to determine whether or not patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD) treated by the staff of a doctor helicopter (DH) service while being transported from the scene or for interhospital transportation obtained a favorable outcome. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ken-ichi Muramatsu, Kazuhiko Omori, Yoshiaki Kushida, Hiroki Nagasawa, Ikuto Takeuchi, Kei Jitsuiki, Jun Shitara, Hiromichi Ohsaka, Yasumasa Oode, Youichi Yanagawa Source Type: research

Barriers to effective EMS to emergency department information transfer at patient handover: A systematic review
Handovers of care are necessary, yet a vulnerable time for patient safety. They can either reduce the risk of medical error during transitions of care or cause direct medical or financial harm to patients due to poor communication. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsay Troyer, William Brady Source Type: research

Spontaneous intramural hematoma of the alimentary canal
We present two cases in which anticoagulation therapy brings spontaneous intramural hematoma of the alimentary canal. In one case, the lesion was located in the ileum, and the other was located in the ascending colon and distal ileum. Both patients were cured through conservative treatment. We suggest that increased attention should be paid if a patient has acute abdominal pain with a history of oral anticoagulant therapy, and the diagnosis of spontaneous intermural hematoma should be considered. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jiu-chuan Wang, Wen-quan Dai, Hong-ke Cai Source Type: research

Impact of dispatcher assisted CPR on ROSC rates: A National Cohort Study
Out of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is a leading cause of mortality. Bystander CPR is associated with increased OHCA survival rates. Dispatcher assisted CPR (DA-CPR) increases rates of bystander CPR, shockable rhythm prevalence, and improves ROSC rates. The aim of this article was to quantify and qualify DA-CPR (acceptance/rejection), ROSC, shockable rhythms, and associations between factors as seen in MDA, Israel, during 2018. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Maya Siman-Tov, Refael Strugo, Timna Podolsky, Ido Rosenblat, Oren Blushtein Source Type: research

Intravenous metoclopramide versus dexketoprofen trometamol versus metoclopramide+ dexketoprofen trometamol in acute migraine attack in the emergency department: A randomized double-blind controlled trial
The objective of this study was to determine the analgesic efficacy and safety of intravenous, single-dose metoclopramide versus dexketoprofen trometamol versus metoclopramide+ dexketoprofen trometamol in patients presenting with acute migraine attack to the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: E. Yavuz, U. Gulacti, U. Lok, K. Turgut Source Type: research

Effect of parental pressure on emergency physicians for computerized tomography imaging request in children with head trauma
In this study, the findings of cranial computed tomography (CCT) scans performed as a result of the parental pressure were evaluated. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mustafa Bo ğan, Mustafa Sabak, Murat Oktay, Hasan Gümüşboğa, Emine Aykol Source Type: research

Evaluation of esmolol for heart rate control in patients with acute aortic dissection
Acute aortic dissection is a serious and life-threatening condition that requires prompt, effective management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of esmolol for heart rate control in patients with acute aortic dissection in the Emergency Department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: J.R. Krenz, M.E. O'Brien, J. Lee, B.D. Hayes Source Type: research

Keeping pace: An ED communications strategy for COVID-19
COVID-19 has required rapid innovation in emergency departments (EDs) across the world [1]. One of many challenges faced by our ED as COVID-19 emerged was how best to communicate effectively with physicians, nurses and other staff amidst unprecedented rates of operational change and new clinical data. ED schedules make rapid communication of change to an entire clinical staff difficult. Yet, the threat of COVID-19 to staff and patient safety made rapid adoption of change critically important. We therefore sought a strategy to disseminate new information in timely and digestible ways. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joshua J. Baugh, Jonathan D. Sonis, Kelly A. Wittbold, Benjamin A. White, Ali S. Raja, Emily L. Aaronson, Paul D. Biddinger, Brian J. Yun Source Type: research

Evaluation of intervention reporting in published emergency medicine clinical trials
The extent of intervention reporting in emergency medicine journals remains unclear. The primary objective is to assess overall completion of the Template for Intervention Description and Replication (TIDieR) checklist described in emergency medicine randomized clinical trials (RCTs). The secondary outcomes were to (1) compare reporting before and after TIDieR publication; (2) evaluate factors associated with intervention reporting. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 13, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ian A. Fladie, Drayton Rorah, Jonathan Pollard, Samuel Jellison, Lehana Thabane, Kelly Murray, Gavin Gardner, Matt Vassar Source Type: research

Leveraging existing quality improvement communication strategies during the COVID-19 crisis
Responding to the 2019 Coronavirus pandemic has been an unexpected and unprecedented challenge for Emergency Medicine leaders and frontline clinical staff. At our university-affiliated, tertiary care emergency department (ED) in Boston, departmental, hospital, and health system leadership has provided extensive communication and training surrounding operational changes, including personal protective equipment (PPE) management, COVID-19 testing policies, potential role reassignments, occupational health policies, and others. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jonathan D. Sonis, Lauren Black, Joshua Baugh, Theodore I. Benzer, Bryan D. Hayes, Ali S. Raja, Benjamin A. White, Susan R. Wilcox, Brian J. Yun, Emily L. Aaronson Source Type: research

Time to antibiotic administration: Sepsis alerts called in emergency department versus in the field via emergency medical services
The Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Early Management Bundle (SEP-1) identifies patients with “severe sepsis” and mandates antibiotics within a specific time window. Rapid time to administration of antibiotics may improve patient outcomes. The goal of this investigation was to compare time to antibiotic administration when sepsis alerts are called in the emergency department (ED) with th ose called in the field by emergency medical services (EMS). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark Mixon, Scott Dietrich, Michael Floren, Ryan Rogoszewski, Lindsay Kane, Nick Nudell, Lindsey Spears Source Type: research

Virtual reality distraction during pediatric intravenous line placement in the emergency department: A prospective randomized comparison study
To evaluate the efficacy of virtual reality distraction (VR) during intravenous line (IV) placement in a pediatric emergency department to increase first-attempt IV success. Secondary endpoints included median time to successful IV placement, patient pain and anxiety scores, and an evaluation of characteristics of patients in whom VR is well tolerated. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Anna K. Schlechter, Winnie Whitaker, Sujit Iyer, Giovanni Gabriele, Matthew Wilkinson Source Type: research

Efficacy of ketamine for initial control of acute agitation in the emergency department: A randomized study
Clinicians often encounter agitated patients, and current treatment options include benzodiazepines and antipsychotics. Ketamine rapidly induces dissociation, maintains cardiovascular stability, spontaneous respirations, and airway reflexes. There are no prospective, randomized studies comparing ketamine to other agents in the initial management of acute agitation in the Emergency Department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Justin Lin, Yelena Figuerado, Adrienne Montgomery, Jonathan Lee, Mark Cannis, Valerie C. Norton, Richard Calvo, Harminder Sikand Source Type: research

A state overview of COVID19 spread, interventions and preparedness
This is a trying time for the world battling the COVID-19 pandemic. By April 4th, 1,192,028 cases have been confirmed worldwide, with 64,316 deaths [1]. COVID-19 is now the 3rd leading cause of daily deaths behind heart disease and cancer [1-3]. The United States (US) holds the greatest number of confirmed cases [1]. By April 4th, 305,820 cases were confirmed with 8291 deaths and a fatality rate of 2.7% [1]. The US has a lower fatality rate than Italy (12.4%) and China (4.0%) [1]. The lower fatality rate could be partially explained by interventions taken by the government. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brendon Sen-Crowe, Mark McKenney, Dessy Boneva, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

Leveraging existing quality improvement communication strategies during the COVID-19 crisis: Creation of an Emergency Department COVID-19 Case Conference
Responding to the 2019 Coronavirus pandemic has been an unexpected and unprecedented challenge for Emergency Medicine leaders and frontline clinical staff. At our university-affiliated, tertiary care emergency department (ED) in Boston, departmental, hospital, and health system leadership has provided extensive communication and training surrounding operational changes, including personal protective equipment (PPE) management, COVID-19 testing policies, potential role reassignments, occupational health policies, and others. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jonathan D. Sonis, Lauren Black, Joshua Baugh, Theodore I. Benzer, Bryan Hayes, Ali S. Raja, Benjamin A. White, Susan R. Wilcox, Brian Yun, Emily L. Aaronson Source Type: research

Electrical storm: A focused review for the emergency physician
Electrical storm is a dangerous condition presenting to the Emergency Department that requires rapid diagnosis and management. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sean Dyer, Benjamin Mogni, Michael Gottlieb Source Type: research

Identification and early anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation in the emergency department
Emergency departments (ED) in the United States see more than half a million atrial fibrillation visits a year, however guideline recommended anticoagulation is prescribed in (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kim Schwab, Richard Smith, Eric Wager, Sukhjit Kaur, Lisa Alvarez, Jordan Wagner, Helen Leung Source Type: research

Transient Amnesia Following Prehospital Low-dose Ketamine Administration
Low doses of ketamine have been shown to be safe and effective for pain relief. Adverse effects are generally mild and transient. A 69-year-old woman suffered a witnessed ground-level fall without report of head injury, loss of consciousness, or intoxication. She was in severe pain despite 10  mg of intravenous morphine and paramedics provided intravenous ketamine 16 mg (0.19 mg/kg). Upon arrival to the ED, she was alert and oriented. An X-ray demonstrated an acute comminuted nondisplaced right humeral head and neck fracture. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - April 9, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Raniah Aljadeed, Stephen Perona Source Type: research