A more realistic relationship between covid 19 and hemopneumothorax
Even though the recent report documented the occurrence of hemopneumothorax in a patient who tested positive for covid 19 infection [1], the most likely underlying cause of hemopneumothorax in this patient was rupture of a vascular bulla, also exemplified by one of the cases previously reported by Ng et al. [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation in prone position: A scoping review
The ongoing pandemic of COVID-19 brought to the fore prone positioning as treatment for patients with acute respiratory failure. With the increasing number of patients in prone position, both spontaneously breathing and mechanically ventilated, cardiac arrest in this position is more likely to occur.This scoping review aimed to summarize the available evidence on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in prone position ( ‘reverse CPR’) and knowledge or research gaps to be further evaluated. The protocol of this scoping review was prospectively registered on 10th May 2020 in Open Science Framework (https://osf.io/nfuh9)....
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alessandra Moscarelli, Pasquale Iozzo, Mariachiara Ippolito, Giulia Catalisano, Cesare Gregoretti, Antonino Giarratano, Enrico Baldi, Andrea Cortegiani Source Type: research

COVID-19 and emergency department volume: The patients return but have different characteristics
The objective of this study was to determine the impact of COVID-19 on ED metrics. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Zach Heppner, Jacob Shreffler, Andrew Polites, Adam Ross, J.J. Thomas, Martin Huecker Source Type: research

Cricket-related injuries treated in United States emergency departments
This study described cricket-related injuries treated at US emergency departments (EDs). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mathias B. Forrester Source Type: research

Serum cholesterol as a predictor of mortality among the elderly patients with pneumonia in the emergency department
This study aimed to investigate the association between serum total cholesterol levels and the clinical outcomes of elderly patients with CAP. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seok Hoon Ko, Jong Seok Lee, Sung Kyoo Kim, Ki Young Jeong Source Type: research

Predicting severe outcomes in Covid-19 related illness using only patient demographics, comorbidities and symptoms
Development of a risk-stratification model to predict severe Covid-19 related illness, using only presenting symptoms, comorbidities and demographic data. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Charles Ryan, Alexa Minc, Juan Caceres, Alexandra Balsalobre, Achal Dixit, Becky Ng, Florian Schmitzberger, Shabbir Syed-Abdul, Christopher Fung Source Type: research

Authors response to “A more realistic relationship between covid 19 and hemopneumothorax” (MS 24398)
Thank you for your comments on our case report and providing us with the opportunity to discuss the possible relationship between COVID-19 and hemopneumothorax. As new information about this disease surfaces daily, we as clinicians must strive to consider novel possibilities for pathophysiology. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ann Long, Felipe Grimaldo Source Type: research

Siblings with pediatric sodium chlorite toxicity causing methemoglobinemia, renal failure and hemolytic anemia
Introduction: Over the past decade, Miracle Mineral Solution (sodium chlorite) has been promoted as a cure-all for many conditions. Case Report: A 9-year-old boy presented with his brother after they accidentally ingested a small amount of undiluted 22.4% sodium chlorite. Symptoms included nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and dyspnea. Oxygen saturation remained 71% despite supplemental oxygen (15  L/min). The patient was noted to have dark chocolate-appearing serum, minimal urine output, diffuse pallor and cyanosis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 7, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jessica Zhen, Capt Usaf, Wael Hakmeh Source Type: research

The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on conducting emergency medicine clinical research
The COVID-19 pandemic challenges the status quo of conducting emergency medicine (EM) research [1]. Research generates new knowledge for the advancement of the medical field, abiding by ethical parameters [1-3]. As EM is on the frontlines of this global crisis, the aim of this correspondence is to consider the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on EM clinical research. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Haley Ehrlich, Mark McKenney, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

An alternative perspective to just halting tranexamic acid utilization in gastrointestinal bleeding
The HALT-IT trial was an international, multicenter, randomized placebo controlled trial involving over 160 hospitals spanning 15 countries [1]. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a 1  g bolus over 10 min followed by 3 g over 24 h or placebo. The primary outcome was death due to bleeding within 5 days of randomization. There were 12,009 patients randomly allocated with 5994 in the TXA group and 6015 in the placebo group. The baseline demographics were balanced between b oth groups with the majority of patients having an upper GIB (89%), randomization occurring in>8  h (58%), and the majority o...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brian W. Gilbert, Megan A. Rech Source Type: research

Application of chain-based sponge dressing for gunshot wounds in the groin
With the application of limb tourniquet, junctional hemorrhage has outstripped extremity hemorrhage as the leading cause of death during recent conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq. We used a gunshot wound femoral artery bleeding model to verify the effect of chain-based sponge dressing (CSD). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Weijin Yang, Junchuan Song, Yuewen Zhu, Zhi Ye, Mingwei Wang, Yongchao Fang, Weihang Wu, Dongsheng Chen, Yu Wang Source Type: research

Evaluation of low-intensity initiatives to improve linkage to care for emergency department patients with opioid use disorder
The surge in opioid-related morbidity [1] and mortality [2] has highlighted the urgent need to link individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) into evidence-based substance use treatment. Emergency department (ED) visits for opioid overdose rose 30% nationally from July 2016 to September 2017 [3]. EDs represent an essential location for identifying patients with OUD and linking them to treatment [4]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Isaac Shaw, Kiran A. Faryar, Richard J. Ryan, Rachel M. Ancona, Francisco J. Fernandez, Michael S. Lyons Source Type: research

Comparison of efficiency and safety of conservative versus interventional management for primary spontaneous pneumothorax: A meta-analysis
There is growing opinion that primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) patients without hemodynamic compromise could be safely and successfully managed with observation alone. The aims of this meta-analysis were to estimate the safety and effectiveness of conservative treatment compared with that of interventional management as the initial treatment option for patients with PSP. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Wan-Li Liu, Kun Lv, Hong-Shen Deng, Qiong-Chuan Hong Source Type: research

Risk factors for non-invasive ventilation failure in influenza infection with acute respiratory failure in emergency department
Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been widely used in hypoxemic acute respiratory failure (ARF) due to influenza pneumonia in the emergency department (ED). However, NIV used in influenza-associated acute respiratory failure had a variable rate of failure. Previous studies have reported that prolonged use of NIV was associated with increased mortality. Our study aimed to identify risk factors for NIV failure in influenza infection with acute respiratory failure in ED. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karn Suttapanit, Jeeranun Boriboon, Pitsucha Sanguanwit Source Type: research

Comment on: “Performance of cardiac troponins within the HEART score in predicting major adverse cardiac events at the emergency department”
This study and similar studies will be very helpful to evaluate and predict the major adverse cardiac events at early discharge from emergency departments however; we want to add some comments that merit more attention. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mehmet Ozgeyik, Ozge Turgay Yildirim Source Type: research

Acute coronary syndrome in Dextrocardia: Case report
Situs inversus with dextrocardia is both a clinical and diagnostic challenge for emergency physicians to properly identify acute coronary syndrome. While dextrocardia itself does not independently increase the risk of coronary artery disease, mirrored symptoms, including right-sided and rightward radiating chest pain in any patient with cardiac risk factors should raise suspicion for acute coronary syndrome. In patients with a reversed cardiac silhouette on a chest radiograph, a reversed electrocardiogram, to include both the precordial and limb leads, is necessary to evaluate for cardiac ischemia in presumed dextrocardia....
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 4, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael J. Yoo, Rachel E. Bridwell, Joshua J. Oliver Source Type: research

Pulmonary thromboembolism in COVID-19: Evaluating the role of D-dimer and computed tomography pulmonary angiography results
COVID-19 patients have a strong propensity to develop thrombosis and their respiratory symptoms often prompt clinicians to assess for the presence of a pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) [1,2]. Prior research estimates that approximately 20% to 30% of patients with COVID-19 have a PTE demonstrated by computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) [3,4]. Some clinical decision rules such as the Pulmonary Embolism Rule-Out Criteria (PERC) and Wells' Criteria are used to assess a patient's risk of PTE. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Leena Ramadan, Christian A. Koziatek, J. Reed Caldwell, Jillian Pecoriello, Christopher Kuhner, Saleena Subaiya, David C. Lee Source Type: research

Air leaks, pneumatoceles, and air spaces in Covid-19 pneumonia
The recent report of SARS-CoV-2-related bilateral pneumothorax [1], and similar reports of covid-19-related bilateral pneumothorax [2 –4] appear to be a predictable consequence of the observation that SARS-CoV-2 pulmonary lesions have a predominantly peripheral and subpleural distribution [5,6], and may be associated with the presence of “emphysema “[5], “cystic air spaces” [6], or “cystic changes” [7], all three ter ms arguably synonymous with pneumatocele. Rupture of a pneumatocele, in turn, may be the trigger for occurrence of pneumothrax, pneumomediastinum, and pneumopericardiu...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

Checking the pulse in the 21st century: Interobserver reliability of carotid pulse detection by point-of-care ultrasound
Introduction: Detection of a pulse is crucial to decision-making in the care of patients who are in cardiac arrest, however, the current standard of manual pulse palpation is unreliable. An emerging alternative is the use of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) for direct assessment of the carotid pulse. The primary objective of this study is to determine the interobserver reliability for physician interpretation of pre-recorded pointof-care ultrasound pulse-check clips for patients who are in cardiac arrest. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David J. Smith, Robert Simard, Jordan Chenkin Source Type: research

Lung sonographic findings in COVID-19 patients
The objective of this study was to describe the lung sonographic findings of COVID-19 patients prospectively and investigate its association with disease severity. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ankit Kumar Sahu, Roshan Mathew, Sanjeev Bhoi, Tej Prakash Sinha, Jamshed Nayer, Praveen Aggarwal Source Type: research

Skin tapes and tissue adhesive vs. either method alone for laceration repair in a porcine model
To determine whether the combination of skin tapes and tissue adhesive is superior to either method alone for laceration repair. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jennifer L. Brown, Dietrich Jehle, James Mayrose, Lainie Schwartz, Jennifer Pugh, Clay O'Brien Source Type: research

Vie scope ® laryngoscope versus Macintosh laryngoscope with personal protective equipment during intubation of COVID-19 resuscitation patient
Airway management is a key element of resuscitation procedures. However, due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, medical personnel should complete medical procedures wearing full personal protective equipment (PPE) for aerosol-generating procedures (AGP) [1]. PPE-AGP should be used especially during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including airway management [2]. Emergency intubation using direct laryngoscopy carries a significant risk of failure. As many authors indicate, the effectiveness of the first intubation attempt with a Macintosh laryngoscope is from 57.6% to 89.9% [3,4]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Maciej Maslanka, Jacek Smereka, Lukasz Czyzewski, Jerzy Robert Ladny, Marek Dabrowski, Lukasz Szarpak Source Type: research

The comparison of two prediction models for ureteral stones: CHOKAI and STONE scores
Renal colic is an emergency symptom characterized by sudden onset of intense pain secondary to urinary stone disease. It is the most common urologic disease of patients seeking help in the emergency department (ED) [1]. The overall prevalence of urinary stone disease is reported as 14% in Turkey [2]. In the United States, over 1 million patients are examined and treated for renal colic every year [3]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 2, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: A.K. Rohat, Erdem Kurt, Çağdaş Şenel Source Type: research

Identifying and quantifying robust risk factors for mortality in critically ill patients with COVID-19 using quantile regression
Many laboratory indicators form a skewed distribution with outliers in critically ill patients with COVID-19, for which robust methods are needed to precisely determine and quantify fatality risk factors. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Zeqiang Linli, Yinyin Chen, Guoliang Tian, Shuixia Guo, Yu Fei Source Type: research

Publisher's Note
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Toc
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Info for authors
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Announcement
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - September 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Association of acute kidney injury with the severity and mortality of SARS-CoV-2 infection: A meta-analysis
we aimed to explore the relationship of acute kidney injury (AKI) with the severity and mortality of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 31, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lichen Ouyang, Yeli Gong, Yan Zhu, Jie Gong Source Type: research

SARS-CoV-2 pharmacologic therapies and their safety/effectiveness according to level of evidence
There is a pressing need for COVID-19 transmission control and effective treatments. We aim to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of SARS-CoV-2 pharmacologic therapies as of August 2, 2020 according to study level of evidence. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 31, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Amanda Baroutjian, Carol Sanchez, Dessy Boneva, Mark McKenney, Adel Elkbuli Source Type: research

Novel biomarkers of oxidative stress as predictive indicators of neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest
This study was conducted to evaluate the utility of BAP and d-ROM in the prediction of patient outcomes after OHCPA. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 30, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kouhei Ishikawa, Yoshiaki Inoue, Yuka Sumi, Yutaka Kondo, Ken Okamoto, Tanaka Hiroshi Source Type: research

Does prolonged emergency department length of stay(EDLOS) affect the outcomes of acute ischemic stroke patients?
The effect of emergency department length of stay (EDLOS) on outcomes of patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) remains largely unexamined. We aimed to investigate the association between EDLOS and outcomes in AIS patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 30, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yan Wu, Xuechun Wu, Hong Pan, Yafang Zhu, Yan Qin, Yongrong Sun, Chun-Feng Liu, Yongjun Cao, Rongfang Shi, Xia Zhang Source Type: research

Toxic boost: Acute, reversible neurotoxicity after ingestion of methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) mistaken for an energy drink
We present the case of a 54-year-old man who developed seizures and altered mental status after drinking 12  oz. of MMT-containing NOS Octane Booster Racing Formula. Due to label similarities, he mistook this for the NOS High Performance energy drink. The patient was intubated due to persistent seizures despite benzodiazepine treatment and admitted to the intensive care unit. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 30, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Antonia Nemanich, Betty Chen, Matthew Valento Source Type: research

Among numerous causes of high troponin values, we should not forget severe arterial hypertension
The recent paper from Long and colleagues reminds us of the multiple causes of increased cardiac troponin (cTn) concentration in the emergency department (ED) setting [1]. It is useful to update the recommendations for the optimal means of interpreting high cTn because it is a major method in diagnosing acute myocardial infarction (AMI), particularly AMI without ST elevation (NSTEMI). cTn is far more beneficial; it is capable of detecting myocardial injury/necrosis which increases cTn concentration in a number of diseases, and cTn can assist in diagnosis and risk stratification [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Goran P. Koracevic Source Type: research

Neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio can predict hospitalization as well as mortality in emergency department
We read the article “Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio is associated with in-hospital mortality in older adults admitted to the emergency department” by Song et al. [1] with interest. The authors hypothesized that an elevated Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) at admission to the emergency department (ED) increases the risk of in-hospital mortality in older adults. In the current study, optimal NLR cutoff value for predicting in-hospital mortality was 3.88, which had 82.14% sensitivity and 52.86% specificity (95% confidence interval 0.669–0.759, area under the curve: 0.714) in older patients admitted to ED...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: K ıvanç Karaman, Yunus Emre Özlüer, Yalçın Gölcük, Ahmet Demir Source Type: research

D-dimer can help differentiate suspected pulmonary embolism patients that require anti-coagulation
Determine whether D-dimer concentration in the absence of imaging can differentiate patients that require anti-coagulation from patients who do not require anti-coagulation. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jatin Narang, Amy S. Nowacki, Spencer S. Seballos, Philip R. Wang, Sharon E. Mace Source Type: research

Intravenous insulin for the management of non-emergent hyperglycemia in the emergency department
There is currently no consensus regarding the necessity of emergency department (ED) glucose reduction to manage hyperglycemia in patients presenting without a hyperglycemic emergency. Known consequences of intravenous (IV) insulin administration include hypoglycemia, hypokalemia, and increased ED length of stay. The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of IV regular insulin on glucose reduction and ED length of stay in patients presenting to the ED with non-emergent hyperglycemia. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lauren J. Koscal, Erin R. Weeda, Andrew J. Matuskowitz, Kyle A. Weant Source Type: research

Epidemiology of fatal snakebites in the United States 1989 –2018
In this study we review the epidemiology of fatal snakebites. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Spencer C. Greene, Jason Folt, Kimberly Wyatt, Nicklaus P. Brandehoff Source Type: research

The implications of covid 19-related pneumomediastinum
The occurrence of spontaneous pneumomediastinum in a patient with covid 19 infection [1] is reminiscent of the occurrence of pneumomediastinum in a 64-year old woman with severe acute respiratory syndrome(SARS), as reported by Tak-Sun et al. in 2004 [2]. In the latter instance the occurrence of pneumomediastinum was associated with chest pain and new T wave inversion over the precordial leads. Creatine kinase and troponin levels, however, were normal. Echocardiography and coronary angiography also showed no abnormalities [2]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

Surgical results in penile fracture: Our single center experience
In this study, we aimed to determine the effectiveness of surgical treatment in penile fracture and its effect on complications. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Fatih Kursat Yilmazel, Emre Sam, Mehmet Sefa Altay, Ahmet Emre Cinislioglu, Emel Sam, Orhan Delice, Ibrahim Karabulut Source Type: research

Non-invasive zero-heat-flux technology compared with traditional core temperature measurements in the emergency department
Core temperatures (Tcore) are often invasive, and can be underutilized. Peripheral temperatures are easier to obtain, but are often less accurate. A zero-heat-flux thermometer (ZHF) is a non-invasive method to obtain core temperatures (TZHF), and has been accurate when compared to Tcore in the operating room. We aimed to determine whether TZHF accurately and reliably measures Tcore in emergency department (ED) patients when compared to rectal, bladder or esophageal temperatures. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Danielle Hart, Megan Rischall, Kyle Durgin, Matthew Donoghue, Thanh Pham, Thomas Wyatt, Jamie Stang, Paige DeVries, Brian Driver Source Type: research

Forty years of emergency medicine research: Uncovering research themes and trends through topic modeling
Topic identification can facilitate knowledge curation, discover thematic relationships, trends, and predict future direction. We aimed to determine through an unsupervised, machine learning approach to topic modeling the most common research themes in emergency medicine over the last 40  years and summarize their trends and characteristics. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Thomas Porturas, R. Andrew Taylor Source Type: research

Tranexamic acid for gastrointestinal bleeding: A systematic review with meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials
This study, therefore, aimed to determine whether or not tranexamic acid should be used in gastrointestinal bleeding management through systematic review and meta-analysis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Po-Lin Lee, Kai-Suan Yang, Hong-Wei Tsai, Sen-Kuang Hou, Yi-No Kang, Chun-Chao Chang Source Type: research

Validity of a five-level prehospital triage system in Japan: A cohort study
This study aimed to validate the five-level triage system. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Atsushi Yamamoto, Akira Kuriyama, Tetsunori Ikegami Source Type: research

Emergency department medication dispensing reduces return visits and admissions
Return visits to the emergency department (ED) and subsequent readmissions are common for patients who are unable to fill their prescriptions. We sought to determine if dispensing medications to patients in an ED was a cost-effective way to decrease return ED visits and hospital admissions for skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrea Blome, Caroline Kaigh, Claire Shaffer, Emily Peoples, Wayne A. Satz, Eun Kim, George Baby, Karen Stauffer, Kraftin E. Schreyer Source Type: research

Assessment of dynamic changes in cardiac function during resuscitation of patients with suspected septic shock: A prospective, observational, cohort study
To describe changes in cardiac function throughout the course of resuscitation of patients with suspected septic shock. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nikolai Schnittke, Jessica Schmidt, Umang Barvalia, Kevin Emmerich, Pierre Kory, Sara Damewood Source Type: research

Misplaced tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis: A case of foreign body aspiration
We describe management of a patient with laryngectomy presenting with aspiration of a tracheoesophageal voice prosthesis (TEP). The TEP was not initially seen in chest radiography; however, computed tomography showed it within the right lower bronchus. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Abia-Trujillo David, Tatari Mehmet, Venegas-Borsellino Carla, Hoffman Ryan, Fox Hannah, Fernandez-Bussy Isabel, Guru Pramod Source Type: research

Mycoplasma pneumonia and atypical acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy
We report an atypical presentation of AHEI in a 1 year 5 months old boy starting initially over the trunk and back, then spreading to the face and extremities. Mycoplasma pneumonia IgM was found to be positive. The ras h resolved spontaneously within two weeks. Herein we present a case of Mycoplasma induced AHEI with an atypical clinical presentation followed by a review of the literature. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elie Saliba, Alain Sayad, Lama Alameddine, Kim El-Haddad, Zeina Tannous Source Type: research

Severe prolonged agitation due to intranasal naloxone overexposure
Naloxone is a frequently administered, life-saving medication. In the setting of the opioid crisis, there are efforts to increase naloxone availability to the general public. In this setting, it is important to ensure that the lay public has instructions for proper administration of naloxone [1]. The presented case details a severe reaction to inappropriate administration of naloxone, highlighting the need for naloxone prescribers to teach how, when, and how much naloxone should be administered in the setting of opioid overdose. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - August 26, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Daniel S. Brenner, Andrew I. Stolbach, Juliana Zschoche, Leah Bright Source Type: research