Electrical cardioversion for atrial fibrillation in the emergency department: A large single-center experience
The objective of this study was to describe the safety and outcomes of this practice in a cohort of patients undergoing ED electrical cardioversion for AF. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Andrew M. Fried, Tania D. Strout, Andrew D. Perron Source Type: research

Efficacy and safety of corticosteroids for septic shock in immunocompromised patients: A cohort study from MIMIC
Corticosteroids have been widely used as adjunct therapy for septic shock for many decades, but both the efficacy and safety remain unclear. The study was designed to investigate overall benefits and potential risks of corticosteroids in immunocompromised patients with septic shock. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 3, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Xin Lu, Xue Wang, Yanxia Gao, Shiyuan Yu, Lina Zhao, Zhongheng Zhang, Huadong Zhu, Yi Li Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Author Index
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Subject Index
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Toc
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Info for authors
(Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Source Type: research

Use of a telehealth follow-up system to facilitate treatment and discharge of emergency department patients with severe cellulitis
Novel long-acting lipoglycopeptide antibiotics allow for the treatment and discharge of selected emergency department (ED) patients with cellulitis who require intravenous antibiotics. Telehealth systems have shown success in remote management of dermatologic conditions; we implemented a telehealth follow-up program for patients diagnosed with cellulitis in the ED, treated with single-dose dalbavancin, and discharged. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 1, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christian Koziatek, Noah Klein, Sanjay Mohan, Viraj Lakdawala, Jordan Swartz, Robert Femia, Robert Press, Christopher Caspers Source Type: research

Two-step predictive model for early detection of emergency department patients with prolonged stay and its management implications
To develop a novel model for predicting Emergency Department (ED) prolonged length of stay (LOS) patients upon triage completion, and further investigate the benefit of a targeted intervention for patients with prolonged ED LOS. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 30, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: James P. D'Etienne, Yuan Zhou, Chen Kan, Sajid Shaikh, Amy F. Ho, Eniola Suley, Erica Blustein, Chet D. Schrader, Nestor R. Zenarosa, Hao Wang Source Type: research

The practical knowledge, experience and beliefs of US emergency medicine physicians regarding medical Cannabis: A national survey
Medical cannabis is legal in 33 US states [1] but remains federally illegal. The majority of legal states require physicians to provide cannabis recommendations in order for patients to have access to it. Our primary study objective was to assess the knowledge, experience and beliefs regarding medical cannabis in US emergency medicine (EM) physicians. A secondary objective was to determine any effects based on demographic variables. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 30, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kevin M. Takakuwa, Frances S. Shofer, Raquel M. Schears Source Type: research

Nebulized tranexamic acid for post-tonsillectomy hemorrhage in children: a promising game changer
Hemorrhage after tonsillectomy can be a life-threatening condition in the pediatric population [1]. Several interventions have been used to prevent and treat this life-threatening bleeding; however, in cases of severe hemorrhage, most of them are not effective in controlling bleeding and this could put a lot of stress on emergency physicians and nurses. Therefore, due to the high risk of postoperative hemorrhage, it is still necessary to discover fast-acting and efficacious treatments. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Touraj Assadi Source Type: research

Temporal trends in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest outcomes in men and women from 2008 to 2015: A national observational study
We compared the temporal trends in survival and neurological outcomes after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in men and women. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seung-sik Hwang, Ki Ok Ahn, Sang Do Shin, Young Sun Ro, Sun Young Lee, Juok Park, Joohyun Suh Source Type: research

Emergency medicine misconceptions: Utility of routine coagulation panels in the emergency department setting
Coagulation panels are ordered for a variety of conditions in the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brit Long, Drew A. Long, Alex Koyfman Source Type: research

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation and skill retention in emergency physicians
The American Heart Association (AHA) recently established the Resuscitation Quality Improvement (RQI) program, which requires physicians to perform quarterly cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skill checks. The aim of this study was to determine if timing of last training impacted skill performance of emergency physicians. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 29, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gillian R. Schmitz, Corey McNeilly, Shelby Hoebee, Erik Blutinger, Jessie Fernandez, Christopher Kang, Sandra Schneider Source Type: research

Informed consent for invasive procedures in the emergency department
Informed consent for procedures in the emergency department (ED) challenges practitioners to navigate complex ethical and medical ambiguities. A patient's altered mental status or emergent medical problem does not negate the importance of his or her participation in the decision-making process but, rather, necessitates a nuanced assessment of the situation to determine the appropriate level of participation. Given the complexities involved with informed consent for procedures in the ED, it is important to understand the experience of key stakeholders involved. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Max M. Feinstein, Janet Adegboye, Joshua D. Niforatos, Richard M. Pescatore Source Type: research

How ready are we? A statewide assessment of pediatric readiness policies
Each year, approximately 34 –37 million children seek emergency medical care in the United States (US) and the majority (83%) present to a general emergency department (ED) [1-3]. The National Academy of Medicine (NAM) reported that the care of children in the ED setting is uneven, and has made recommendations to enhance ped iatric emergency care [4]. Subsequently, the National Pediatric Readiness Project (NPRP) was started to help implement recommendations for pediatric emergency care including 18 pediatric-specific policies (PSP) [5]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ashley A. Foster, Michael C. Monuteaux, Joyce Li Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Pennsylvania law enforcement use of Narcan
Opioid-related drug overdose deaths continue to rise at an alarming rate and have reached the level of a national crisis [1,2]. Timely administration of naloxone (Narcan ®) can reverse the respiratory depression characteristic of opioid overdoses. A series of state legislative changes have recently occurred enabling law enforcement to carry and administer naloxone [3,4]. Pennsylvania (PA), a state with one of the highest rates of death due to opioid overdose, enact ed PA Act 139 in 2014, which allows first responders to administer naloxone to people with suspected overdoses and provides immunity to those responding to ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeanne L. Jacoby, Lauren M. Crowley, Robert D. Cannon, Kira D. Weaver, Tara K. Henry-Morrow, Kathryn A. Henry, Allison N. Kayne, Colleen E. Urban, Robert A. Gyory, John F. McCarthy Source Type: research

Studying the relevance of beers criteria to the contemporary ED
We read with interest the article by Harrison et al. which brings to question the clinical relevance of the 2015 Beers Criteria in today's emergency department setting [1]. The researchers examined the medical charts of a convenience sample of 400 emergency department patients (aged ≥65 years) of a single trauma centre. They found that the prevalence of a chief complaint of interest amongst patients with a Beers Criteria medication (28%) was no different than that of patients without any Beers Criteria medication (29%) reported on file. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Stefano Barillaro, Madeleine Genest, Eric Villeneuve, Sophie Gosselin Source Type: research

A neighborhood analysis of Twitter communication in emergency medicine
Over the last decade, social media and free open access medical education (FOAM) has emerged as popular forms of education and information dissemination within Emergency Medicine. Many clinicians, from trainees to board-certified physicians, increasingly interact and share information on social media platforms such as Twitter [1]. Twitter has been popular among medical educators as a platform for disseminating information [2]. Within Twitter, it is common practice for users to “tweet at” or mention users when posting, in order to share information. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joel Park, Marc Probst, Bory Kea, Bernard P. Chang Source Type: research

Intravenous acetaminophen does not have an opioid sparing effect in Emergency Department patients with painful conditions
Pain in the Emergency Department is common and is frequently treated with opioids. Due to the opioid epidemic, it is clinically helpful to decrease opioid usage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate opioid requirement in Emergency Department patients with painful conditions who receive intravenous acetaminophen. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Z. Blok, M.L. Ridderikhof, H. Goddijn, M. Berendsen, M.W. Hollmann Source Type: research

Addressing the vexing challenge of bleeding from oral anticoagulants in the ED
Findings from the SOAR (Safety of Oral Anticoagulants Registry) study by Pollack et al. in this issue of AJEM are a welcome addition to the growing body of literature on oral anticoagulants in the emergency department setting [1]. The authors of this multi-center collaborative study address an urgent problem frequently asked by front line EPs: How do we manage bleeding complications from these new oral anticoagulants? (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 28, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mark B. Mycyk Source Type: research

Early prediction of pediatric acute kidney injury from the emergency department: A pilot study
Identifying acute kidney injury (AKI) early can inform medical decisions key to mitigation of injury. An AKI risk stratification tool, the renal angina index (RAI), has proven better than creatinine changes alone at predicting AKI in critically ill children. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Holly R. Hanson, Michael A. Carlisle, Rachel S. Bensman, Terri Byczkowski, Holly Depinet, Tara C. Terrell, Hilary Pitner, Ryan Knox, Stuart L. Goldstein, Rajit K. Basu Source Type: research

Comparing physicians and experienced advanced practice practitioners on the interpretation of electrocardiograms in the emergency department
Many patients present to emergency departments (ED) in U.S. for evaluation of acute coronary syndrome, and a rapid electrocardiogram (ECG) and interpretation are imperative for initial triage. A growing number of advanced practice practitioners (APP) (e.g. physician assistants, nurse practitioners) are assisting patient care in the ED. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 27, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexander Hoang, Amarinder Singh, Amandeep Singh Source Type: research

Acute kidney injury following traumatic rhabdomyolysis in Kermanshah earthquake victims; A cross-sectional study
This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and predictive factors of AKI in Kermanshah earthquake victims. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hamidreza Omrani, Iraj Najafi, Kiomars Bahrami, Farid Najafi, Saeed Safari Source Type: research

Neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio is associated with in-hospital mortality in older adults admitted to the emergency department
The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that an elevated neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) at admission is associated with and increased risk of mortality in older patients admitted to the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Hwan Song, Hyo Joon Kim, Kyu Nam Park, Soo Hyun Kim, Sang Hoon Oh, Chun Song Youn Source Type: research

A meta-analysis for Kuanxiong Aerosol on the treatment of angina pectoris
Kuanxiong Aerosol (KA) has been used in patients with angina pectoris (AP) attacks for many years, this systematic review and meta-analysis aims to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of KA versus nitrates in the treatment of AP. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jieqin Zhuang, Xingzhen Dai, Haobo Zhang, Yanhong Chen, Hairong Cai, Zilin Jin, Li Zhong, Bojun Chen Source Type: research

Real-world utilization of andexanet alfa
We read with interest the online article by Brown et al. [1], describing their use of andexanet alfa in reversing factor Xa inhibitors, specifically apixaban and rivaroxaban. The authors were mostly consistent with the trial [2], although they interestingly included patients that would have been excluded in ANNEXA-4 (e.g. patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) of less than 7, initial hematoma volume of more than 60  mL and patients undergoing a procedure in the next 12 h). We appreciate the authors efforts to increase the reporting of clinical data with use of andexanet alfa, however, some concerns still remain. (Sou...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 23, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Caroline Bernard, Eric Villeneuve, Madeleine Genest, Sophie Gosselin Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

The authors reply: Still much to learn about andexxa alfa in the ED
We appreciate the comments in the letter to the editor regarding our study describing our utilization of andexanet alfa [1]. Of the four patients with an intracranial hemorrhage (ICH) in our study who died, none had hematoma expansion noted on repeat imaging. One patient had a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) with a Modified Fisher score of 4, and the three other patients had an ICH with ICH scores of 4, 3, and 2 respectively. Our results are similar to studies evaluating prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) for reversal in this patient population which found that PCC did not change clinical outcomes [2,3]. (Source: The Amer...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 23, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Caitlin S. Brown, Rachael A. Scott, Meera Sridharan, Alejandro A. Rabinstein Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

The optimal peripheral oxygen saturation may be 95 –97% for post-cardiac arrest patients: A retrospective observational study
Current post-resuscitation guidelines recommend oxygen titration in adults with the return of spontaneous circulation after cardiac arrest. However, the optimal peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) is still unclear for post-cardiac arrest care. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 22, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: D.W. Zhou, Z.M. Li, S.L. Zhang, L. Wu, Y.Y. Li, J.X. Zhou, G.Z. Shi Source Type: research

Identification of disguised extrapulmonary tuberculosis
One of the most important messages from the recent review is that diagnostic difficulty can occur as a result of clinical presentations of extrapulmonary tuberculosis that overlap with other conditions [1]. Conditions which can overlap with extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis include extrapulmonary manifestations of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease (IgG4-RD) and cryptococcal infection. In each of these disorders the extrapulmonary complications which occur may be indistinguishable from the extrapulmonary manifestations of tuberculosis. (Source: The A...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

Early brain computed tomographic angiography to screen for blunt cerebrovascular injuries in patients with polytrauma: Is it necessary?
This study aimed to determine the optimal timing of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) screening for suspicious BCVI in patients with polytrauma. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 20, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ling-Wei Kuo, Chih-Po Hsu, Shih-Ching Kang, Chi-Tung Cheng, Chien-Hung Liao, Chun-Hsiang Ou Yang, Chih-Yuan Fu, Chi-Hsun Hsieh, I-Ming Kuo Source Type: research

A potential association between myocardial ischemia and epinephrine for anaphylaxis
A previously healthy 60-year-old man presented to our emergency department with anaphylactic shock. We initiated fluid resuscitation with Ringer's lactate solution; injected 0.3  mg epinephrine intramuscularly; and administered d-chlorpheniramine maleate 5 mg, famotidine 20 mg, and methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously. His symptoms resolved within 10 min. Thirty minutes after the epinephrine injection, he complained of sudden chest discomfort. Physical examination pr ovided no evidence of anaphylaxis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seigo Urushidani, Akira Kuriyama Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

Crashing eclamptic patient and a resulting peri-mortem C-section
Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is high acuity, low occurrence event. It involves the coordination of multiple teams to take care of ultimately two patients. This is further compounded by physiology that is frequently unfamiliar to the providers taking care of the patient. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sean Hickey, Marti Soffer, David Cherkas, Andrew Ditchik, Brenda Beloosesky Tags: Case Report Source Type: research

A case report on the crashing eclamptic patient and a resultingperi-mortem C-section
Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is high acuity, low occurrence event. It involves the coordination of multiple teams to take care of ultimately two patients. This is further compounded by physiology that is frequently unfamiliar to the providers taking care of the patient. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sean Hickey, Marti Soffer, David Cherkas, Andrew Ditchik, Brenda Beloosesky Source Type: research

Is the flow-safe disposable continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) system as effective as non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) in the treatment of acute cardiogenic pulmonary Oedema?
Acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPO) is one of the common causes of acute respiratory failure, constituting 10% –20% of acute heart failure syndromes and potentially causing death [1]. Acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema ACPO usually presents with sudden dyspnoea at rest, impaired exertion capacity, tachypnoea, tachycardia and hypoxia. Increased endogenous catecholamine levels and hypertension due to stress are common in cases with good left ventricular function. Cough is a frequent finding in these cases. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: U.Z. İlhan, Güçlü Selahattin KIYAN, Enver ÖZÇETE, Sercan YALÇINLI, Mehmet Birkan KORGAN, Yusuf Ali ALTUNCI, Murat ERSEL, Funda Karbek AKARCA, Oğuz YAVUZGİL Source Type: research

A potential association between myocardial ischemia and epinephrine for anaphylaxis: A case report and literature review
A previously healthy 60-year-old man presented to our emergency department with anaphylactic shock. We initiated fluid resuscitation with Ringer's lactate solution; injected 0.3  mg epinephrine intramuscularly; and administered d-chlorpheniramine maleate 5 mg, famotidine 20 mg, and methylprednisolone 80 mg intravenously. His symptoms resolved within 10 min. Thirty minutes after the epinephrine injection, he complained of sudden chest discomfort. Physical examinati on provided no evidence of anaphylaxis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seigo Urushidani, Akira Kuriyama Source Type: research

A case report on the crashing eclamptic patient and a resulting peri-mortem C-section
Cardiac arrest in pregnancy is high acuity, low occurrence event. It involves the coordination of multiple teams to take care of ultimately two patients. This is further compounded by physiology that is frequently unfamiliar to the providers taking care of the patient. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sean Hickey, Marti Soffer, David Cherkas, Andrew Ditchik, Brenda Beloosesky Source Type: research

The authors respond: Diagnosis of Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis and Avoiding Anchoring Bias
We thank Dr. Jolobe for his insightful comments regarding our review “Tuberculosis: a focused review for the emergency medicine clinician” [1,2]. Dr. Jolobe highlighted several conditions that present similarly to tuberculosis (TB), including pleural effusion in a patient with previously diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, pericardial effusion in a patient with previously diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, immunoglobulin G4-related pleuropulmonary disease and tuberculous pleurisy, and disseminated tuberculosis in a patient with cryptococcal meningitis [...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brit Long, Stephen Y. Liang, Alex Koyfman, Michael Gottlieb Source Type: research

Medicaid expansion and resource utilization in the emergency department
The Affordable Care Act (ACA) has impacted the insurance mix of emergency department (ED) visits, yet the degree to which this has influenced provider behavior is not clear. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alexander T. Janke, Shooshan Danagoulian, Arjun K. Venkatesh, Phillip D. Levy Source Type: research

Novel tube thoracostomy device reduces incision length
Chest tubes have historically been the intervention of choice for pleural drainage of blood, fluid, or air. Classic techniques may pose complications and have the potential to cause life-threatening injury [1]. The Reactor ® device, developed by Sharp pharmaceuticals, is a one-use plastic device that employs a retractable blade to cut through the subcutaneous tissue and enter the pleural space. Once the pleural cavity is entered, a catheter slides off the device and into the chest cavity. The chest tube is then place d through the catheter and subsequently attached to suction and secured. (Source: The American Journal ...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Christopher Falslev, Shannon N. Thompson, Daniela Feldhausen Source Type: research

Complication of otitis media leads to opisthotonos in a toddler
Opisthotonos, extreme involuntary neck and back extension, is rarely seen in modern emergency departments. Vaccines have prevented the most common causes of this clinical presentation. Alternatively, otitis media is one of the most common pediatric infections and is characteristically non-invasive and harmless. In exceedingly rare cases, otitis media can develop complications and progress to invasive pneumococcal diseases including mastoiditis and meningitis. Streptococcus pneumoniae accounts for the majority of otitis media infections, however, since the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) a...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Samantha B. Esposito, Andrew H.F. Miller, Roy Rajan, Tibisay Villalobos, Susan K. Yaeger Source Type: research

Choosing wisely in emergency medicine: Early results and insights from the ACEP emergency quality network (E-QUAL)
To characterize performance among ED sites participating in the Emergency Quality Network (E-QUAL) Avoidable Imaging Initiative for clinical targets on the American College of Emergency Physicians Choosing Wisely list. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Arjun K. Venkatesh, Jean Sun Scofi, Craig Rothenberg, Carl T. Berdahl, Nalani Tarrant, Dhruv Sharma, Pawan Goyal, Randy Pilgrim, Kevin Klauer, Jeremiah D. Schuur Source Type: research

In reply to MS 22060 - Diagnosis of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and avoiding anchoring bias
We thank Dr. Jolobe for his insightful comments regarding our review “Tuberculosis: a focused review for the emergency medicine clinician” [1,2]. Dr. Jolobe highlighted several conditions that present similarly to tuberculosis (TB), including pleural effusion in a patient with previously diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, pericardial effusion in a patient with previously diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, immunoglobulin G4-related pleuropulmonary disease and tuberculous pleurisy, and disseminated tuberculosis in a patient with cryptococcal meningitis [...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Brit Long, Stephen Y. Liang, Alex Koyfman, Michael Gottlieb Source Type: research

The role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis
We have read the article titled “Critical pancreatitis management associated with hypertriglyceridemia in pregnancy in emergency service” published by Satılmış et al. [1] with great interest. We thank the authors for this informative and successful manuscript. We also would like to mention a few important points about plasm a exchange therapy (plasmapheresis/apheresis) in acute pancreatitis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kamil Kokulu, Serdar Özdemir, Abdullah Algın, Hatice Şeyma Akça Source Type: research

Brief overview of Pentraxin 3
We have read with great interest study by Gokdemir et al. [1] about the “Pentraxin 3 level in acute migraine attack with aura: Patient management in the emergency department”. The authors investigated the value of Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) in the diagnosis of acute migraine and the results suggested obvious effectiveness of PTX3 (sensitivity 93% and specificity 84%). The f indings give us confidence in PTX3-assisted diagnosis of acute migraine, whereas there still lacks support of evidence-based medicine. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jun Zhang, Haili Wang, Boming Xia, Lun Dong Source Type: research

Diagnosis of aortic dissection by transesophageal echocardiography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation
Early identification of the causes of cardiac arrest is helpful in determining the resuscitation measures during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We aimed to evaluate the feasibility of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) during CPR in diagnosing aortic dissection and the influence of aortic dissection on resuscitation outcome in adult patients with prolonged non-traumatic cardiac arrest. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yong Won Kim, Woo Jin Jung, Kyoung-Chul Cha, Young-Il Roh, Yoon-seop Kim, Oh. Hyun Kim, Yong Sung Cha, Hyun Kim, Kang Hyun Lee, Sung Oh. Hwang Source Type: research

CLIF-OF > 9 predicts poor outcome in patients with Amanita phalloides poisoning
Amanita phalloides poisoning with high mortality is rare but serious. The aim of this study is to identify the risk indicators of death in patients with Amanita phalloides poisoning and a good score tool to predict prognosis. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 16, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yongzhuang Ye, Zhenning Liu, Min Zhao Source Type: research

Treatment of migraine attacks by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in emergency department: A randomize controlled trial
The primary purpose of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) therapy application in the emergency department. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Nihat M. Hokenek, Mehmet O. Erdogan, Ummahan Dalkilinc Hokenek, Abdullah Algin, Davut Tekyol, Avni U. Seyhan Source Type: research

The utilization of CTA in management of gastrointestinal bleeding in a tertiary care center ED. Are we using it enough?
Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common patient presentation to the Emergency Department (ED) and the source can be difficult to diagnose. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - January 11, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Katherine Stewart, Ashwani Kumar Sharma Source Type: research