WITHDRAWN: Mometasone furoate for children with asthma: A meta-analysis
This paper was withdrawn due to concerns over repetitive publication. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause.The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jing Lei, Songdong Ma Source Type: research

Resource utilization across the continuum of HIV care: An emergency department-based cohort study
The objective of this study was to determine the healthcare resource utilization for people living with HIV (PLWH) presenting to the emergency department (ED) across the HIV Care Continuum. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Abia Abia, Richard E. Rothman, Amir M. Mohareb, Grace Li Hsien Lim, Anuj V. Patel, Benjamin Bigelow, Eili Y. Klein, Gai Cole, Kelly A. Gebo, Richard D. Moore, Yu-Hsiang Hsieh Source Type: research

Predictors of clinically relevant differences between noninvasive versus arterial blood pressure
Blood pressure (BP) measurements are important for managing patients with hypertensive emergencies (HE). Previous studies showed that there was significant difference between IABP and NIBP but no information whether these differences changed management. Our study investigated the factors associated with the differences affecting BP management of patients with HE. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Alison Raffman, Umang Shah, Jackson F. Barr, Soha Hassan, Lesley U. Azike, Saman Tanveer, Suzanne Bracklow, Brandon Parker, Daniel J. Haase, Quincy K. Tran Source Type: research

Utility of the blood urea nitrogen to serum albumin ratio as a prognostic factor of mortality in aspiration pneumonia patients
This study aimed to determine whether the blood urea nitrogen to serum albumin (B/A) ratio is a useful prognostic factor of mortality in patients with aspiration pneumonia. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seung Ryu, Se kwang Oh, Sung Uk Cho, Yeonho You, Jung Soo Park, Jin Hong Min, Wonjoon Jeong, Yong chul Cho, Hong Joon Ahn, Changshin Kang Source Type: research

Risk factors associated with intracranial bleeding and neurosurgery in patients with mild traumatic brain injury who are receiving direct oral anticoagulants
The established clinical risk factors for post-traumatic intracranial bleeding have not been evaluated in patients receiving DOACs yet. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Gianni Turcato, Arian Zaboli, Massimo Zannoni, Giorgio Ricci, Elisabetta Zorzi, Laura Ciccariello, Andrea Tenci, Norbert Pfeifer, Antonio Maccagnani, Antonio Bonora Source Type: research

Glasgow Coma Scale is a better delayed neurological sequelae risk factor than neurological examination abnormalities in carbon monoxide poisoning
We have read the article by Sari Dogan et al. with great interest recently published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine [1]. The authors demonstrated that abnormalities in the initial neurological examination (NE) were a significant predictive factor for delayed neurological sequelae (DNS) in carbon monoxide poisoning (COP). However, neurological examination abnormalities (NEA) which included altered mental status, headache, low GCS score ( (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ping Xu, Yushu Wang, Linghong Cao, Wenbin Huang, Jianjun Zhang, Xia Gao, Cong Lin Source Type: research

Is prehospital supplemental oxygen effective for acute stroke?
Dr. Dylla and colleagues [1] performed a well-conducted cohort study concerning the efficacy and safety of prehospital supplemental oxygen for acute stroke. Despite the essential information provided, several issues must be resolved to draw confirmed conclusions. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kai Zhang Source Type: research

Hallway bed status is associated with lower patient satisfaction
Overcrowding has been reported in Emergency Medicine literature for decades and has demonstrated a negative impact on adverse events including mortality, quality of care, elopement, return to the emergency department (ED), medical errors, and timeliness of patient care [1-3]. As a result of ED volumes exceeding ED bed capacity, patients are being cared for in hallways outside of conventional rooms. Of the few studies that exist on patient satisfaction related to ED overcrowding and hallway bed use, the sample sizes were relatively small or they measured only satisfaction on those who were admitted [4-6]. (Source: The Ameri...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: David M. Richardson, Ali R. Yazdanyar, Kathryn B. Bartlett, Akshay Gupta, Max W. Needham, Jennifer Sadowski, John J. Scholz, Jeanne L. Jacoby, Bryan G. Kane, Marna Rayl Greenberg Source Type: research

The prediction levels of emergency clinicians about the outcome of the ambulance patients and outpatients
In this study, we aimed to determine the prediction levels of emergency clinicians according to working year on the outcome of the ambulance patients and outpatients presented to the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mustafa Çalis, Kemal Sener, Adem Kaya, Sezai Sari, Mustafa Polat, Sadiye Yolcu Source Type: research

Mometasone furoate for children with asthma: A meta-analysis
Mometasone furoate shows some potential in treating paediatric asthma. We conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy and safety of mometasone furoate for paediatric asthma. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 24, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jing Lei, Songdong Ma Source Type: research

A prospective cross-sectional study examining the documented evaluation of patients at high risk for mild traumatic brain injury
This study was done to determine the proportion of patients, who were considered high risk for an mTBI, that had documentation of an mTBI evaluation. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 22, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: C. Christopher Zalesky, Tim P. Moran, Rachel R. Koval, Jasmine Usher, Jonathan J. Ratcliff, Daniel Wu, David W. Wright Source Type: research

Female millennial patient perspectives in the emergency department: A qualitative analysis
For many patients, the emergency department (ED) represents their first interaction with a hospital system, so establishing positive first impressions is especially important [1]. Patients satisfied with their care are more likely to return to the healthcare institution in the future, remain more compliant with medical regimens and attend follow-up appointments, thus improving the patient's treatment goals and clinical outcomes [2]. In recent years, patient satisfaction has been tied to reimbursements, incentivizing health systems to address this area [3-5]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elizabeth Upton, Rohit B. Sangal, Erik Blutinger, Mary Khachatryan, Mira Mamtani, Jaya Aysola Source Type: research

The authors respond: Heart rate variability analytic techniques
The analytic techniques suggested by the author of the correspondence are intriguing, and we agree that these would be valuable ways to examine HRV data, perhaps as the focus of a future study. Given this study's present sample size, however, this would be challenging. Linearity was maintained in our regression model, and residual errors were normally distributed and maintained equal variances. Given the limited sample size, however, linearity was not evaluated in a stepwise fashion across increasing severity scores. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: John E. Arbo Source Type: research

Effects of spinal immobilization at 20 ° on end-tidal carbon dioxide
The aim was to determine the effect on end-tidal carbon dioxide (ETCO2) of spinal immobilization (SI) at a conventional 0 ° angle and to investigate the usefulness of immobilization at a 20° angle for preventing possible hypoventilation. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Seda Da ğar, Şeref Kerem Çorbacioğlu, Emine Emektar, Hüseyin Uzunosmanoğlu, Yunsur Çevik Source Type: research

Comment on “A PRESing case of visual changes and confusion”
Ronnie and colleagues reported a case of a 10-year-old female with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) complicated by hypertension and cardiomyopathy secondary to lupus who presented to the emergency department with a history of vision loss and headache [1]. The authors diagnosed the patient with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Although interesting, the diagnostic criteria for PRES was not met. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 21, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Linpei Jia, Hongliang Zhang Source Type: research

Does second EMS unit response time affect outcomes of OHCA in multi-tiered system? A nationwide observational study
The time dependence of a multi-tier response for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-dependent effect of EMS response type in a multi-tiered system on the clinical outcomes of OHCA. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 20, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeong Ho Park, Kyoung Jun Song, Sang Do Shin, Ki Jeong Hong Source Type: research

Evaluation and management of pulmonary hypertension in the emergency department setting
Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary arterial pressure and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 20, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Erica Simon, Rachel E. Bridwell, Tim Montrief, Alex Koyfman, Brit Long Source Type: research

Automating Spanish translation of metered-dose inhaler discharge instructions
Asthma-related emergency department (ED) or urgent care (UC) visits are a common occurrence amongst pediatric patients that have previously received treatment for a respiratory-related chief complaint [1]. Dispensing a metered-dose inhaler (MDI) upon discharge from the ED, UC, or hospital setting reduces 28-day readmission rates [2]. Children's Hospital Colorado serves a diverse patient population, with approximately 16% of Colorado residents between 5 and 17 primarily speaking Spanish [3]. Literature shows that non-English speaking patients who are given a medication with directions in their native language have a greater...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kevin T. Poel, Matthew Millard, Rachel Swenson, Wenru Zhou, Kristen Campbell Source Type: research

The authors respond: Reporting novel treatments of life threatening ingestions
We thank the authors for their interest in our case report [1]. Unfortunately, they did not appreciate the purpose of our article. We did not intend to dictate the therapy of toxin ingestion based upon robust evidence. Rather, as with most case reports, the purpose of our publication was to be hypothesis generating in order to provide clinical rationale for investigators wishing to evaluate this topic in greater detail. We were presented with a life-threatening ingestion and preemptively (prior to hemodynamic deterioration) chose to initiate hemodialysis based upon the known science and physiology of caffeine. (Source: The...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Benjamin Kohl, Kuljit Kaur, Nathan Dincher, Jessica Schumann, Tara Carachilo, Chris Komurek Source Type: research

Emergency physician performed ultrasound-assisted lumbar puncture in children: A randomized controlled trial
Lumbar puncture (LP) is one of the most common procedures performed in pediatric emergency departments but first-attempt success rates remain low and traumatic LP remains frequent. The aim of this study was to determine if ultrasound performed by emergency physicians improves the probability of first-attempt success for lumbar puncture in children. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jaryd Zummer, Marie-Pier Desjardins, Jade S éguin, Jocelyn Gravel, Michel Roy Source Type: research

Feasibility and initial experience with continuous nerve blocks by emergency physicians
Peripheral nerve blocks and regional anesthesia are routinely used to alleviate pain in the emergency department. Our objective is to report on the feasibility and initial experience of emergency physicians initiating and managing continuous nerve blocks for trauma patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marc L. Martel, Mark R. Robidoux, Jaleesa L. Morris, Robert F. Reardon Source Type: research

Operational metrics, patient demographics, acuity, and treatment times at privately owned freestanding emergency departments
Freestanding EDs [FSEDs] are distinct from hospital-based emergency departments (HBEDs) in that they are geographically separate from hospitals [1]. FSEDs can be independently owned (IFSED) or owned by a hospital system (HOPD). Both varieties differ from clinics or urgent cares in that they are capable of providing a higher level of care. They are open 24  h a day, 365 days a year, and have the resources and staffing to evaluate and stabilize acute emergencies. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Erin L. Simon, John R. Dayton, Nicholas J. Jouriles, James J. Augustine, Olivia Hallas, Sunita Shakya, Nicholas Marburger, Gillian Schmitz Source Type: research

Author response to “A PRESing case of visual changes and confusion”
We would like to thank the authors for their letter regarding our recent publication and pathophysiologic review of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). In the letter, the authors argued that our case was not likely a clear presentation of PRES. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 19, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jeffrey P. Louie, Michael Murati, Tanisha Ronnie, David Nascene Source Type: research

Impact of patient delay in a modern real world STEMI network
The impact of patient delay on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), when system delay has performance that meets the current recommended guidelines, is poorly investigated. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Enrico Fabris, Paola Arrigoni, Luca Falco, Giulia Barbati, Davide Stolfo, Alberto Peratoner, Giancarlo Vitrella, Serena Rakar, Andrea Perkan, Gianfranco Sinagra Source Type: research

Point-of-care procalcitonin may predict the need for surgical treatment in patients with small bowel obstruction
The early identification of patients with small bowel obstruction who require surgical treatment could potentially lead to improved patient outcomes. We evaluated the efficacy of point-of-care procalcitonin for predicting surgical treatment among patients with small bowel obstruction. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Misaki Murasaki, Taizo Nakanishi, Ken-ichi Kano, Ryo Shigemi, Shinsuke Tanizaki, Kumiko Kono, Minoru Hayashi, Hideya Nagai, Shigenobu Maeda, Hiroshi Ishida Source Type: research

Frequency of safety net errors in the emergency department: Effect of patient handoffs
The objective of this study was to determine physician awareness of abnormal vital signs and key clinical interventions (oxygen provision, intravenous access) in the emergency department, and to measure the effect of patient handoffs on this awareness. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Joseph S. Turner, Rachel D. Courtney, Elisa Sarmiento, Timothy J. Ellender Source Type: research

A randomized controlled trial of adding intravenous corticosteroids to H1 antihistamines in patients with acute urticaria
Acute urticaria is a common dermatological condition in emergency departments (EDs). The main therapy involves controlling pruritus with antihistamines. Although guidelines have promoted the use of corticosteroids in addition to H1 antihistamines, well-designed clinical trials evaluating this approach are scarce. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Pakhawadee Palungwachira, Ketsara Vilaisri, Khrongwong Musikatavorn, Jongkonnee Wongpiyabovorn Source Type: research

Impact of symptoms to ECG delay in a modern real world pre-hospital STEMI network
The impact of patient delay on left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), when system delay has performance that meets the current recommended guidelines, is poorly investigated. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Enrico Fabris, Paola Arrigoni, Luca Falco, Giulia Barbati, Davide Stolfo, Alberto Peratoner, Giancarlo Vitrella, Serena Rakar, Andrea Perkan, Gianfranco Sinagra Source Type: research

Hemodynamic response of restoring sinus rhythm in critically ill patients with atrial fibrillation
Electrical cardioversion (ECV) is the recommended treatment for atrial fibrillation (AFib) in critically ill patients, despite lacking data showing hemodynamic benefits of restoring sinus rhythm in this setting. The aim of this study was to assess the hemodynamic effect of successful ECV in a cohort of hemodynamically unstable critically ill patients. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mattia Arrigo, Alexandre Mebazaa, Dominique Bettex, Alain Rudiger Source Type: research

Hydrochlorothiazide-induced systemic capillary leak
Hypersensitivity reactions to drugs may cause very rapid physiologic derangements that can be fatal in the absence of adequate compensatory mechanisms or definitive treatment. For the most part, adverse drug reactions that progress over the course of minutes are mediated either by mast cell or complement activation. If a patient survives the acute event, appropriate long-term management requires the identification and future avoidance of the inciting drug. Here, we describe a patient who experienced two life-threatening multisystem reactions with cardiopulmonary compromise minutes after taking hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ). (...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Peter Vadas Source Type: research

Enzymatic debridement as an effective treatment for combined flame and chemical burns caused by e-cigarettes
Since its introduction on the market in 2007, the number of reports on injuries caused by the ignition or explosion of electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) has increased significantly.Two male patients have been treated at our burn center, the for ENDS-related injuries. Their batteries came into contact with metal objects stored in their pants pockets, resulting in a short circuit and finally ignition. In both patients, the combined flame and chemical burn wounds were initially irrigated with water upon arrival at the emergency department, leading to increased levels of pain. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Karel E.Y. Claes, Tom Vyncke, Edward De Wolf, Henk Hoeksema, Jozef Verbelen, Stan Monstrey Source Type: research

Non-linearity of the association between heart rate variability and severity of illness
I read with great interest on the study by Arbo JE and colleagues [1], which investigated the severity of illness and heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is a biomarker that low and high values will indicate unhealthy status, and there is a physiological range indicating the heart is performing well (healthy irregularity). In this situation, the correlation between HRV and severity of illness cannot be fully described by a linear function. Although the exact functional form between HRV and severity of illness is not known, it is a typical practice to check the linearity assumption in building linear regression model. (Source...
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Yishan Hu Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Hemodialysis removal of caffeine
We read with interest the publication from Kohl et al. “Acute intentional caffeine overdose treated preemptively with hemodialysis” [1]. Caffeine toxicity causes significant adrenergic toxicity that can result in end organ damage and even mortality following massive exposures. Because the structural, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of caffeine are similar to theophylline [2], it is understandable that hemodialysis be considered in caffeine overdose as it would be with theophylline. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marc Ghannoum, Robert S. Hoffman, Darren M. Roberts, Valery Lavergne, Thomas D. Nolin, Sophie Gosselin Source Type: research

Sedatives used in children to obtain head CT in the emergency department
Children in the emergency department who require computerized tomography (CT) of the head often are given sedative medications to facilitate completion of the study with adequate imaging. A prior study found the two most common medications used to obtain head CT in children were pentobarbital and chloral hydrate; however, these medications have become less popular. We hypothesized that there was variability in medication choice amongst providers in the emergency department and there has been a change in the preferred sedatives used in the last decade. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 18, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rebecca Kriss Burger, Janet Figueroa, Courtney McCracken, Michael D. Mallory, Pradip P. Kamat Source Type: research

The impact of helicopter emergency medical service on acute ischemic stroke patients: A systematic review
Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) is commonly elected transport for acute ischemic stroke (AIS) known as a time-critical illness. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 15, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Shachar Tal, Saban Mor Source Type: research

QTc, Tp-e interval and Tp-e/QTc ratio in patients with nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage
To the best of our knowledge, the Tp-e interval and the Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios have not been studies in recent years in terms of their use for the evaluation of ventricular repolarization in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Akkan Avci, Selen Acehan, Begum S. Avci, Muge Gulen, Atilla Bulut, Salim Satar Source Type: research

Survival, neurological and safety outcomes after out of hospital cardiac arrests treated by using prehospital therapeutic hypothermia: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Survival after pre-hospital cardiac arrest (PHCA) remains low. Pre-hospital therapeutic hypothermia (PTH) is believed to improve patient's outcomes, but data on efficacy and safety remains scarce. Herein, we aimed to assess the influence of PTH on survival, neurological outcome, and adverse effects in patients with PHCA. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lukasz Szarpak, Krzysztof J. Filipiak, Lauretta Mosteller, Milosz Jaguszewski, Jacek Smereka, Kurt Ruetzler, Sanchit Ahuja, Jerzy R. Ladny Source Type: research

The safety and efficacy of hands-on defibrillation in the management of adult cardiac arrest: A systematic review
Hands-on defibrillation (HOD) is a technique that has great potential to positively impact outcomes from cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) with the removal of an interruption in chest compressions. The safety and efficacy of HOD, however, have yet to be proven. This review aims to examine the safety of HOD, and secondarily, its efficacy. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 14, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jaeon Kwak, William J. Brady Source Type: research

The rising cost of commonly used emergency department medications (2006 –15)
We determine how aggregate costs have changed for commonly used emergency department (ED) medications, and assess drivers of cost increases. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 13, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Collin Tebo, Maryann Mazer-Amirshahi, Mark S. Zocchi, Colin Gibson, Sarah Rosenwohl-Mack, Renee Y. Hsia, Erin R. Fox, Lewis S. Nelson, Jesse M. Pines Source Type: research

Transthoracic echocardiography is a noninvasive alternative to TEE
Even though transesophageal echocardiography(TEE) proved useful for identifying aortic dissection(AD) as the cause of cardiac arrest in the recently reported series [1], the invasive nature of that procedure poses potential risks to a patient with AD [2-4]. The risks include airway obstruction by a TEE probe in an adult patient with AD of the ascending aorta [2], and rupture of aortic dissection during attempted TEE [3]. In the third patient, fatal cardiac tamponade occurred, which was believed to be attributable to rupture of circumferential aortic dissection during TEE [4]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 13, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Oscar M.P. Jolobe Source Type: research

Diagnosis of aortic dissection during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Transthoracic versus transesophageal echocardiography
Transthoracic-focused cardiac ultrasound (FoCUS) is a simplified point-of-care transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) used to obtain information critical for patient management. The integration of FoCUS into cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is helpful in detecting potential causes of cardiac arrest and in assessing cardiac contraction and volume status [1]. However, several factors need to be considered to determine the role of transthoracic FoCUS in the diagnosis of aortic dissection during CPR. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 13, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Sung Oh. Hwang, Kyoung-chul Cha Source Type: research

Evaluating Target: Stroke guideline implementation on assessment and treatment times for patients with suspected stroke
Immediate ischemic stroke treatment improves outcomes and early alteplase administration is recommended for patients within window. We implemented stroke guidelines through a neuro-resuscitation initiative (NRI) and hypothesized that the intervention would decrease times to assessment and treatment. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 13, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Danielle Albright, Robert Alunday, Eric Schaller, Huy Q. Tran, Cameron S. Crandall Source Type: research

Rates of substance use disorder treatment seeking visits after emergency department-initiated buprenorphine
Emergency department-initiated buprenorphine (EDIB) programs have been shown to improve treatment outcomes for patients with opioid use disorders (OUD); however, little is known about how EDIB implementation impacts the patient census at participating hospitals. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 12, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Lindsey K. Jennings, Carolyn Bogan, Jenna McCauley, Angela Moreland, Suzanne Lane, Ralph Ward, Karen Hartwell, Louise Haynes, Kathleen T. Brady Source Type: research

Xuebijing combined with ulinastation for sepsis: A few noteworthy additions
I read carefully the milestone work in American Journal of Emergency Medicine by Zheng et al. about the effectiveness and safety of Xuebijing combined with ulinastation for the treatment of sepsis [1]. Although this meta-analysis was well performed following a strict methodology and Hu et al. [2] have already responded to this, I do have several issues that might improve the study. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kai Zhang Source Type: research

Physician assistant utilization in U.S. emergency departments; 2010 to 2017
Physician Assistants (PAs) are widely used in United States (US) Emergency Departments(EDs). We sought to characterize ED PA utilization and practice characteristics in US EDs 2010 –2017. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Fred Wu, Michael Darracq Source Type: research

Pediatric Lantana camara ingestions reported to Texas poison centers
Lantana camara (common lantana) is a member of the verbena (Verbenaceae) family. The perennial shrub can grow to 2  m in height and form dense thickets. The plant's flowers are small and tubular with four petals and occur in clusters. The flowers come in many different colors (e.g., red, yellow, white, pink, lavender, orange). Its fruit is a berry-like drupe containing 1–2 seeds and turns from green to dark purple as it matures; although discrete, the berries grow in clusters and when ripe have a mild resemblance to blackberries [1-3]. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 10, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mathias B. Forrester, Lizbeth Petty Source Type: research

Is Nigella sativa supplementation effective for asthma?
I read with interest carefully the article by He et al. [1] published in a recent issue of American Journal of Emergency Medicine. The topic of the meta-analysis is interesting and much work and effort was put in this study to evaluate the efficacy of Nigella sativa supplementation in asthmatic patients. While I generally agree with the conclusions of the study, I would like to express our concerns regarding some methodological issues. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 8, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Kai Zhang Source Type: research

Prehospital time intervals and management of ischemic stroke patients
Quantify prehospital time intervals, describe prehospital stroke management, and estimate potential time saved if certain procedures were performed en route to the emergency department (ED). (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 7, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Timmy Li, Jeremy T. Cushman, Manish N. Shah, Adam G. Kelly, David Q. Rich, Courtney M.C. Jones Source Type: research

The role of plasmapheresis in the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis Referencing MS 21763
The author responds (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 6, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Correspondence Source Type: research

Meningitis due to Weissella Confusa
Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening condition that should be addressed as an emergency. The typical culprit microorganisms are targeted empirically with ceftriaxone and vancomycin, in the absence of an immunocompromised state. In this case report, however, we are describing a case of meningitis secondary to Weissella confusa, bacteria inherently resistant to the two drugs commonly used to empirically treat meningitis. Weissella spp. are Gram-positive, catalase-negative coccobacilli and an infrequent cause of infection in humans. (Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine)
Source: The American Journal of Emergency Medicine - February 5, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Rola A. Cheaito, Ghassan Awar, Maria Alkozah, Mohamad Ali Cheaito, Imad El Majzoub Tags: Case Report Source Type: research