Effects of Weight Loss in Outpatients with Mild Chronic Heart Failure: Findings from the J-MELODIC Study
Obesity promotes cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM), and cancer. However, in several diseases, including chronic heart failure (CHF), patients with obesity have a better prognosis than those without obesity; this is known as the “obesity paradox”.1, 2 Conversely, low body weight (BW) and low body mass index (BMI) are reportedly strong predictors of heart failure (HF) exacerbation and death. Takiguchi et al. reported BMI as an independent predictor of cardiac and all-cause mortality in hospitalized patients with HF with the risk progressively increasing from obese to overweight, and nor...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - November 15, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Yoshitaka Okuhara, Masanori Asakura, Yoshiyuki Orihara, Yoshiro Naito, Takeshi Tsujino, Masaharu Ishihara, Tohru Masuyama, J-MELODIC study investigators Source Type: research

Lower Extremity Function as a Marker of Frailty and Outcomes of Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction in Older Adults
Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) remains predominantly a disease of aging and older adults.1 Disease management programs centered on management of heart failure, without addressing coexisting geriatric conditions, have not successfully reduced hospitalizations in older adults with HFpEF.2 Clinical management is uniquely challenged by complexities that result from the high burden of geriatric conditions, such as multimorbidity and frailty.3 In fact, the rate of hospitalizations for reasons other than heart failure in this population is at least as high as or higher than that of heart failure hospitaliz...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - November 12, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dae Hyun Kim, Sandra M. Shi Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Heart Failure Epidemiology in Patients with Diabetes Mellitus Without Coronary Heart Disease
Epidemiology of patients with comorbid heart failure (HF) and diabetes mellitus (DM) without coronary heart disease (CHD) is not well described. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - November 10, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Hassan Khan, Stefan D. Anker, James L. Januzzi, Darren K. McGuire, Naveed Sattar, Hans Juergen Woerle, Javed Butler Source Type: research

Use of Heart Failure Exacerbating Medications Among Adults with Heart Failure
Optimal treatment regimens for adults with heart failure (HF) should include medications where the potential benefits outweigh the risks. However, the use of pharmacologic agents whose risks outweigh the potential benefits has received little attention, despite their potential to contribute to adverse outcomes among adults with HF. To help clinicians identify potentially-harmful agents, the American Heart Association (AHA)1 released a list of medications that could exacerbate HF. To date, patterns of the use of these potentially-harmful agents are unknown. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - November 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Jerard Kneifati-Hayek, Peter Kennel, Joanna Bryan, Monika M. Safford, Parag Goyal Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research

Improvement in Biventricular Cardiac Function Following Ambulatory Counterpulsation
Survivals in patients with advanced heart failure (HF) have improved following the development of heart transplantation (HTx) and left ventricular assist devices (LVAD).1,2 However, these treatment modalities are associated with complications that may adversely impact quality of life. Ideally, strategies that encourage recovery of native myocardial function would provide the best long-term solution to chronic HF. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - November 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Teruhiko Imamura, Colleen Juricek, Tae Song, Takeyoshi Ota, David Onsager, Nitasha Sarswat, Gene Kim, Jayant Raikhelkar, Sara Kalantari, Gabriel Sayer, Daniel Burkhoff, Valluvan Jeevanandam, Nir Uriel Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Incidence, Predictors, and Outcomes of New Onset Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction after Orthotopic Liver Transplantation
= Coronary artery disease (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - November 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Vaughn A. Eyvazian, Jonathan S. Gordin, Eric H. Yang, Olcay Aksoy, Henry M. Honda, Ronald W. Busuttil, Vatche G. Agopian, Gabriel Vorobiof Source Type: research

Heart Transplantation Cost Composition in Brazil: A Patient-Level Microcosting Analysis and Comparison With International Data
We examined cost expenditures of heart transplants in a public institution in Brazil. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Livia A Goldraich, Jeruza L Neyeloff, Ana Paula Beck da Silva Etges, Lais G Zeilmann, Laura T Hastenteufel, Eduarda C Ghisleni, Nadine Clausell Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Heart Transplantation Cost Composition in Brazil: A Patient Level Microcosting Analysis and Comparison with International Data
We examined cost expenditures of heart transplants in a public institution in Brazil. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Livia A. Goldraich, Jeruza L. Neyeloff, Ana Paula Beck da Silva Etges, Lais G. Zeilmann, Laura T. Hastenteufel, Eduarda C. Ghisleni, Nadine Clausell Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

The Incremental Value of Right Ventricular Size and Strain in the Risk Assessment of Right Heart Failure post-Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation
Right heart failure (RHF) represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity following left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation.1,2 In the last few years, several predictive scores for post-LVAD RHF were developed including the CRITT (Central venous pressure, severe Right ventricular dysfunction, preoperative Intubation, severe Tricuspid regurgitation and Tachycardia), EUROMACS (European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support) and Michigan scores.3 –7 Among them, the CRITT score has shown reasonable external validation with c-statistics in the range of 0.65 to 0.70. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 26, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Marie Aymami, Myriam Amsallem, Jackson Adams, Karim Sallam, Kegan Moneghetti, Matthew Wheeler, William Hiesinger, Jeffrey Teuteberg, Dana Weisshaar, Jean-Philippe Verhoye, Y. Joseph Woo, Richard Ha, Fran çois Haddad, Dipanjan Banerjee Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Pulmonary artery wedge pressure at rest and during exercise in healthy adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Background: The pulmonary artery wedge pressure (PAWP) response to exercise may unmask latent heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. There remains a lack of consensus over threshold values for PAWP during exercise. A systematic review of studies examining PAWP by right heart catheterization at rest and during exercise in healthy individuals was performed.Methods and Results: Relevant data derived from healthy volunteers were stratified by age (> or ≤40 years) and sex. Three exercise intensities were predefined: Light, Moderate, and Strenuous. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 23, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Sam Esfandiari, Emil Wolsk, David Granton, Lucas Azevedo, Felipe Homem Valle, Finn Gustafsson, Susanna Mak Tags: Basic Science and Experimental Studies Source Type: research

Heart failure etiologies and challenges to care in the developing world: an observational study in the democratic republic of congo
Limited data are available with regards to etiology and outcome of heart failure as well as organization of care in the developing world. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 22, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Didier Malamba-Lez, Dophra NGOY-NKULU, Paul Steels, D ésiré Tshala-Katumbay, Wilfried Mullens Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Hydrogen- and Methane-Based Breath Testing and Outcomes in Patients With Heart Failure
Relatively few bacterial populations live within the small intestine.1 Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a disease caused by an excessive amount of bacteria in the upper alimentary tract.2 This phenomenon is mainly due to the entrance of colonic species into the small intestine. Different conditions are causally linked with SIBO development, among them structural abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and GI disorders such as decreased gastric acidity, reduced peristaltic activity, and mucosal damage. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Anna Mollar, Maria Pilar Villanueva, Eduardo N ÚÑez, Arturo CarratalÁ, Francisco Mora, Antoni BayÉs-GenÍs, Miguel MÍnguez, Vannina G. Marrachelli, Daniel Monleon, David Navarro, Juan Sanchis, Julio NÚÑez Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Hydrogen and Methane-Based Breath Testing and Outcomes in Patients with Heart Failure
Few bacterial populations live within the small intestine [1]. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a disease caused by an excessive amount of bacteria in the upper alimentary tract [2]. This phenomenon is mainly due to the entrance of colonic species into the small intestine. Different conditions are causally linked with SIBO development, among them: structural abnormalities of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and GI disorders such as decreased gastric acidity, reduced peristaltic activity, and mucosal damage. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Anna Mollar, Maria Pilar Villanueva, Eduardo N úñez, Arturo Carratalá, Francisco Mora, Antoni Bayés-Genís, Miguel Mínguez, Vannina G. Marrachelli, Daniel Monleon, David Navarro, Juan Sanchis, Julio Núñez Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

A Novel Paradigm For Sacubitril/Valsartan: Beta-Endorphin Elevation As A Contributor To Exercise Tolerance Improvement In Rats With Preexisting Heart Failure Induced By Pressure-Overload
: Simultaneous angiotensin receptor (AT1) blockade and neprilysin inhibition with sacubitril/valsartan has been recently approved to treat patients with heart failure (HF). Therapeutic benefits of this therapy have been attributed to natriuretic peptide elevation and AT1 receptor blockade. However, this pharmacologic picture may not be complete. The aims of this study were to investigate the pharmacology of sacubitril/valsartan in comparison to monotherapies with sacubitril, and valsartan, and to examine their impact on peptides upregulated by neprilysin inhibition, such as beta-endorphin. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: MY Maslov, S Foianini, MV Orlov, JL Januzzi, MA Lovich Source Type: research

Failure to develop new therapies in AHF – is it time to de-focus from congestion?
In the current issue of the Journal, Hamo and colleagues review the standard therapeutic targets in acute heart failure (AHF) and discuss the dissociation between these targets and the successful development of new therapies for AHF (1). The main question we are faced with is: how can we improve on this dismal track record? (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 18, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Gad Cotter, Beth A. Davison Source Type: research

Low Utilization of Beta-Blockers Among Medicare Beneficiaries Hospitalized for Heart Failure With Reduced Ejection Fraction
The American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association recommend treating patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) with the use of the evidence-based beta-blockers bisoprolol, carvedilol, and sustained-release metoprolol succinate1 to reduce mortality and hospitalizations.2 –6 To avoid triggering decompensation, treatment should begin with a low dose and then be uptitrated over time.1 A report from an HF registry study conducted from 2003 to 2004 that was designed to improve adherence to treatment guidelines found that 75% of patients hospitalized for HFrEF were dis...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 16, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Matthew Shane Loop, Melissa K. van Dyke, Ligong Chen, Monika M Safford, Meredith L Kilgore, Todd M Brown, Raegan W Durant, Emily B Levitan Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Low utilization of beta blockers among Medicare beneficiaries hospitalized for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction
The American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association recommend treating patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) with the evidence-based beta blockers bisoprolol, carvedilol, and sustained-release metoprolol succinate(1) in order to reduce mortality and hospitalizations.(2 –6) To avoid triggering decompensation, treatment should begin with a low dose and then be uptitrated over time.(1) A report from an HF registry study conducted from 2003 - 2004 that was designed to improve adherence to treatment guidelines found that 75% of patients hospitalized for HFrEF were ...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 16, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Matthew Shane Loop, Melissa K. Van Dyke, Ligong Chen, Monika M. Safford, Meredith L. Kilgore, Todd M. Brown, Raegan W. Durant, Emily B. Levitan Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Heart failure and suicide: the role of depression
In a case-control study of over 5600 adults from Taiwan published in this month's Journal of Cardiac Failure, Liu and colleagues observed that individuals diagnosed with HF within the past two years were at significantly elevated risk for suicide, even when accounting for physical problems, psychiatric illness, and other suicide risk factors.1 Furthermore, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, cerebrovascular disease, and cancer were associated with an increased risk of suicide in adjusted analyses. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 15, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Christopher M. Celano, Jeff C. Huffman Source Type: research

Understanding the Etiology of Heart Failure among the Rural Poor in Sub-Saharan Africa: a 10-year Experience from District Hospitals in Rwanda
Heart failure is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. Our understanding of the heart failure burden in this region has been limited mainly to registries from urban referral centers. Starting in 2006, a nurse-driven strategy was initiated to provide echocardiography and decentralized heart failure care within noncommunicable disease (NCD) clinics in rural district hospitals in Rwanda. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 9, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Lauren A Eberly, Emmanuel Rusingiza, Paul H Park, Gedeon Ngoga, Symaque Dusabeyezu, Francis Mutabazi, Emmanuel Harerimana, Joseph Mucumbitsi, Philippe F Nyembo, Ryan Borg, Cyprien Gahamanyi, Cadet Mutumbira, Evariste Ntaganda, Christian Rusangwa, Gene F K Source Type: research

A novel simple diagnostic algorithm for rapid and accurate detection of anemia etiology in patients with advanced heart failure
Anemia is common in heart failure (HF) and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. (1,2) We have previously shown that iron deficiency (ID) is the cause of anemia in 73% of patients with advanced HF. (3) Importantly, ID has emerged as a therapeutic target in HF. (4-7) However, ID detection in HF is problematic: traditional cut-off values of ferritin have low diagnostic value in HF, (8) and bone marrow (BM) aspiration, the diagnostic gold standard, is invasive. In the FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF trials ID was defined as ferritin (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Elisabeth Kaldara, Konstantinos Malliaras, Despina Barbarousi, Chris J. Kapelios, Stella Vakrou, Ioannis Tachliabouris, John N. Nanas Source Type: research

Adequate Evidence, Inadequate Incentives for Disease Management Programs
Heart failure has emerged as one of the greatest medical challenges of the current century. Affecting over 26 million people worldwide and costing more than $108 billion annually, it is a condition that needs innovative and cost-effective solutions.1,2. In this issue of the Journal of Cardiac Failure, Bocchi et al. demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of implementing a disease management program (DMP) focused on heart failure.3 The DMP was an inexpensive nursing-led program concentrating on long-term educational reinforcement and telephone follow up. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Manoj Thangam, Karen E Joynt Maddox Source Type: research

Remote Monitoring of Patients with Heart Failure: A White Paper from the Heart Failure Society of America Scientific Statements Committee
Remote patient monitoring (RPM) seeks to use electronic means to optimally manage health conditions outside healthcare facilities. RPM first gained popularity in the heart failure (HF) community after several studies, including the 1995 study by Rich et al., demonstrated reductions in HF readmissions with telephone and clinic follow-up.1 However, subsequent large randomized trials have brought into question the efficacy of various forms of RPM. At the same time, the FDA approval of an implantable device that provides direct, real-time measurements of pulmonary artery pressure (CardioMEMS ™ HF system, St. (Source: Jou...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 8, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Michael G. Dickinson, Larry A. Allen, Nancy A. Albert, Thomas Di Salvo, Gregory A. Ewald, Amanda R. Vest, David J. Whellan, Michael R. Zile, Michael M. Givertz Tags: Consensus Statement Source Type: research

The Crossroads of Frailty and Heart Failure: What More Can We Learn?
The interest in frailty in heart failure (HF) has grown considerably in the past decade. We now know that frailty, which is commonly defined as a biologic syndrome of decreased reserve and increased vulnerability to stressors,1 is highly prevalent among adults with HF.2 There is also evidence that frailty is a harbinger of worse clinical outcomes,3 particularly among patients undergoing treatment for advanced HF,4,5 and that frailty in HF is associated with greater health care utilization.6 The strong association between frailty and adverse outcomes in HF raises the question, what more can we learn about frailty in HF? (So...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Quin E. Denfeld, Christopher S. Lee Tags: Editorial Comment Source Type: research

Resting Heart Rate and Chronotropic Response to Exercise: Prognostic Implications in Heart Failure Across Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction Spectrum.
We studied the relationship between resting HR, chronotropic response to exercise, and clinical outcomes in patients with HF across the spectrum of left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF). (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: M ário Santos, Erin West, Hicham Skali, Daniel E. Forman, Wilson Nadruz, Amil M. Shah Source Type: research

The Crossroads of Frailty and Heart Failure: What More Can We Learn? ✰
The interest in frailty in heart failure (HF) has grown considerably in the past decade. We now know that frailty, which is commonly defined as a biologic syndrome of decreased reserve and increased vulnerability to stressors,1 is highly prevalent among adults with HF.2 There is also evidence that frailty is a harbinger of worse clinical outcomes,3 particularly among patients undergoing treatment for advanced HF,4,5 and that frailty in HF is associated with greater healthcare utilization.6 Hence, the strong association between frailty and adverse outcomes in HF begs the question: What more can we learn about frailty in HF?...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Quin E. Denfeld, Christopher S. Lee Source Type: research

First hospitalization for heart failure in outpatients with stable coronary artery disease: determinants, role of incident myocardial infarction, and prognosis
Heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem with a high mortality rate.1 Coronary artery disease (CAD) has been reported to be the predominant cause of HF.2 Numerous studies have analyzed HF early after myocardial infarction (MI), with a special focus on ventricular remodeling.3 –6 However, relatively limited information is available regarding HF development in patients with stable CAD. Previous analyses of patients with stable CAD enrolled in the Cholesterol And Recurrent Events (CARE) and Prevention of Events with an ACE Inhibitor (PEACE) studies showed that HF occurren ces over time had important prognosti...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Nicolas Lamblin, Thibaud Meurice, Olivier Tricot, Pascal de Groote, Gilles Lemesle, Christophe Bauters Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Biochemical Determinants of Changes in Plasma Volume after Decongestion Therapy for Worsening Heart Failure
Optimal vascular volume is required to avoid organ dysfunction during decongestive therapy for worsening heart failure (HF). The present study investigated the relation between changes in serum substance(s) and the vascular volume after diuresis in HF patients. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: HAJIME KATAOKA Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

Heart Failure Differentially Modulates the Effects of Ivabradine on the Electrical Activity of the Sinoatrial Node and Pulmonary Veins
This study investigated the electrophysiological effects of ivabradine on SANs and PVs in a rabbit model of HF. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 5, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Chao-Shun Chan, Yao-Chang Chen, Shih-Lin Chang, Yung-Kuo Lin, Yu-Hsun Kao, Shih-Ann Chen, Yi-Jen Chen Tags: Basic Science and Experimental Studies Source Type: research

Editorial Board
(Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 1, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Table of Contents
(Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 1, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Masthead
(Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 1, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

Information for Authors
(Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 1, 2018 Category: Cardiology Source Type: research

To Invest or Divest – Tough Choices in the Wake of VEST
Recently a patient of mine, a middle-aged woman with chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy and moderate left ventricular systolic dysfunction, was admitted to a local hospital with acute decompensated heart failure (HF), where an echocardiogram reportedly demonstrated an ejection fraction (EF) of 15%. In addition to treating her HF, they slapped a LifeVest (ZOLL) on her and told her to see her regular cardiologist (me) as soon as possible. Several months later she showed up in my office – still wearing the LifeVest. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - October 1, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Michael W. Rich Source Type: research

Right Ventricular Free Wall Strain Is Associated With Long-Term Renal Function in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction
Renal impairment in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality.1 The impact of abnormal right ventricular mechanics on mortality and heart failure (HF) –related hospitalizations has been described.2 However, there are limited data looking at the association between right ventricular cardiac mechanics and long-term renal function in HFpEF. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 21, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Kevin Bryan Lo, Pradhum Ram, Napatt Kanjanahattakij, Shuchita Gupta, Gregg S. Pressman, Janani Rangaswami Tags: RV strain and renal function in heart failure Source Type: research

Acute Hemodynamic Effects of Biventricular Pacing After Left Ventricular Assist Device
Despite cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), some patients with heart failure progress and undergo left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation. Management of CRT following LVAD has not been well studied. The purpose of this study was to determine whether RV pacing or biventricular pacing measurably impacts acute hemodynamics in patients with an LVAD and CRT device. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 21, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Joanna M. Joly, Deepak Acharya, Harish Doppalapudi, G. Neal Kay, Chee Paul Lin, William R. Maddox, H. Thomas McElderry, Salpy V. Pamboukian, Vance J. Plumb, Indranee N. Rajapreyar, Jos é A. Tallaj, Takumi Yamada, Vineet Kumar Tags: Research Letter Source Type: research

Right Ventricular Free Wall Strain is Associated with Long Term Renal Function in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction.
Renal impairment in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality [1]. The impact of abnormal right ventricular mechanics on mortality and heart failure related hospitalizations has been described [2]. However, there are limited data looking at the association between right ventricular cardiac mechanics and long-term renal function in HFpEF. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 21, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Kevin Bryan Lo, Pradhum Ram, Napatt Kanjanahattakij, Shuchita Gupta, Gregg S. Pressman, Janani Rangaswami Source Type: research

The Impella Microaxial Flow Catheter Is Safe and Effective for Treatment of Myocarditis Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Analysis From the Global cVAD Registry
Myocarditis complicated by cardiogenic shock remains a complex clinical problem. Myocarditis refers to heart-specific infectious or noninfectious inflammatory conditions with clinical manifestations ranging from mild nonspecific symptoms to cardiogenic shock.1 Therapeutic options for myocarditis are limited. Aggressive immunosuppressive regimens have not been shown to affect mortality or left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF).2,3 Transvalvular pumps (Impella; Abiomed, Danvers, Massachusetts) provide hemodynamic support4,5 by decreasing cardiac workload while increasing systemic mean arterial pressure. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Shiva K. Annamalai, Michele L. Esposito, Lena Jorde, Theodore Schreiber, Shelley A. Hall, William W. O'Neill, Navin K. Kapur Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

The Impella Micro-Axial Flow Catheter is Safe and Effective for Treatment of Myocarditis Complicated by Cardiogenic Shock: An Analysis from the Global cVAD Registry
Myocarditis complicated by cardiogenic shock remains a complex clinical problem. Myocarditis refers to heart specific infectious or non-infectious inflammatory conditions with clinical manifestations ranging from mild, non-specific symptoms to cardiogenic shock [1]. Therapeutic options for myocarditis are limited. Aggressive immunosuppressive regimens have not been shown to impact mortality or left ventricular ejection fraction [2, 3]. Trans-valvular pumps (Impella, Abiomed, Danvers, MA) provide hemodynamic support [4, 5] by decreasing cardiac workload while increasing systemic mean arterial pressure (MAP) [6-8]. (Source: ...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Shiva K. Annamalai, Michele L. Esposito, Lena Jorde, Theodore Schreiber, Shelley Hall, William W. O'Neill, Navin K. Kapur Source Type: research

Pupillary light reflex as a new prognostic marker in patients with heart failure
Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of death globally1. Neuroendocrine dysregulation is among the most important pathophysiological factors involved in the high mortality rate associated with HF2. Neuroendocrine dysregulation is observed mainly as an imbalance of autonomic control3, and is characterized by markedly elevated sympathetic activation4 and parasympathetic withdrawal5. Autonomic function is generally evaluated by heart rate variability obtained from Holter electrocardiography6, and its clinical implications have been demonstrated in patients with HF7, 8. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Kohei Nozaki, Kentaro Kamiya, Yuya Matsue, Nobuaki Hamazaki, Ryota Matsuzawa, Shinya Tanaka, Emi Maekawa, Takuya Kishi, Atsuhiko Matsunaga, Takashi Masuda, Toru Izumi, Junya Ako Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Effects of oral supplementation with nitrate-rich beetroot juice in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension – results from BEET-PAH an exploratory randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare, progressive, symptomatic, and ultimately fatal disease associated with a progressive elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure and the pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in right heart failure (1). Endothelial dysfunction, a pathological feature of PAH, is attributed to the imbalance between endogenous pulmonary vasodilators and vasoconstrictors, in particular nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin and endothelin-1 (2, 3). (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 20, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dan Henrohn, Kristoffer Bj örkstrand, Jon O. Lundberg, Sven-Olof Granstam, Tomasz Baron, Inga J. Ingimarsdóttir, Hans Hedenström, Andrei Malinovschi, Mona-Lisa Wernroth, Martin Jansson, Mikael Hedeland, Gerhard Wikström Source Type: research

Relations of vitamin D status with B-type natriuretic peptide levels and the risk of cardiac events in Japanese subjects with heart failure
Several prior studies have shown that Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are very common in patients with heart failure (HF)1, 2 and that very low levels are associated with increased mortality.3-5 However, none of the prior studies specifically targeted a Japanese population where the prevalence of HF is rapidly increasing because of a steady increase in the aging society.6 We aimed to clarify the frequency of vitamin D deficiency in Japanese patients with HF, and to determine whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is an independent predictor for adverse outcome. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 19, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Kyoko Otani, Yukie Higa, Kanako Tanaka, Hiroko Adachi, Akemi Nakazono, Yosuke Nabeshima, Masahisa Honda, Yutaka Otsuji, Masaaki Takeuchi Tags: Letters to the Editor Source Type: research

Estimation of Incident Heart Failure Risk among US Hispanics/Latinos Using a Validated Echocardiographic Risk-Stratification Index: the Echocardiographic Study of Latinos
The lifetime risk of developing incident heart failure (HF) in the US is 20% for individuals older than 40 years.1 Few HF scores rely solely on echocardiographic parameters of cardiac structure and function to determine the risk of incident HF. Among these, the Heart and Soul Study (HSS) developed a validated echocardiographic risk-stratification index (ERSI) in participants with stable coronary artery disease to predict the 4-year probability of incident HF among asymptomatic individuals, independent from and superior to clinical risk factors. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: M. Octavia Rangel, Robert Kaplan, Martha Daviglus, Neil Schneiderman, Barry E. Hurwitz, Jianwen Cai, Franklyn Gonzalez, Dalane Kitzman, Mayank Kansal, Carlos J. Rodriguez Source Type: research

Estimation of Incident Heart Failure Risk in United States Hispanic/Latinos With the Use of a Validated Echocardiographic Risk-Stratification Index: HCHS/SOL Echo Study of Latinos
The lifetime risk of developing incident heart failure (HF) in the US is 20% for individuals older than 40years.1 Few HF scores rely solely on echocardiographic parameters of cardiac structure and function to determine the risk of incident HF. Among these, the Heart and Soul Study (HSS) developed a validated echocardiographic risk-stratification index (ERSI) in participants with stable coronary artery disease to predict the 4-year probability of incident HF among asymptomatic individuals, independent from and superior to clinical risk factors. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: M. Octavia Rangel, Robert Kaplan, Martha Daviglus, Neil Schneiderman, Barry E. Hurwitz, Jianwen Cai, Franklyn Gonzalez, Dalane Kitzman, Mayank Kansal, Carlos J. Rodriguez Source Type: research

Will the Early Use of Biomarkers Prevent the Development of Heart Failure?
There are several factors known to increase the risk of developing heart failure, with both a normal (HFpEF) and decreased (HFrEF) left ventricular ejection fraction. Prominent amongst these risks include increasing age, atherosclerotic heart disease (with/without myocardial infarction), systemic hypertension, and diabetes. These conditions are considered Stage A in the spectrum of heart failure (1) and surveillance is recommended but the specific methods have not been well defined. When there is evidence of a cardiac structural abnormality, such left ventricular hypertrophy or a reduction in the LVEF (Stage B), then speci...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Eugene E. Wolfel Source Type: research

Estimation of Incident Heart Failure Risk in Us Hispanics/Latinos Using a Validated Echocardiographic Risk-Stratification Index: HCHS/SOL Echo Study of Latinos
The lifetime risk of developing incident heart failure (HF) in the US is 20% for individuals older than 40 years.1 Few HF scores rely solely on echocardiographic parameters of cardiac structure and function to determine the risk of incident HF. Among these, the Heart and Soul Study (HSS) developed a validated echocardiographic risk-stratification index (ERSI) in participants with stable coronary artery disease to predict the 4-year probability of incident HF among asymptomatic individuals, independent of and superior to clinical risk factors. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 14, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: M. Octavia Rangel, Robert Kaplan, Martha Daviglus, Neil Schneiderman, Barry E. Hurwitz, Jianwen Cai, Franklyn Gonzalez, Dalane Kitzman, Mayank Kansal, Carlos J. Rodriguez Source Type: research

Lower extremity function is independently associated with hospitalization burden in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction
Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has reached epidemic proportions in the developed world, and now represents approximately half of heart failure (HF) cases. Patients with HFpEF are typically older adults who have multiple additional comorbid illnesses. As the population ages and associated comorbidities become more common, the prevalence of HFpEF is expected to rise sharply in the years ahead1. Unfortunately, outcomes remain poor despite multiple large clinical trials of well-reasoned cardiovascular therapies, possibly because many deaths and hospitalizations in patients with HFpEF are non-cardiovascu...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Whitney E. Hornsby, Mohamed-Ali Sareini, Jessica R. Golbus, Cristen J. Willer, Jennifer L. McNamara, Matthew C. Konerman, Scott L. Hummel Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Very early diuretic response after admission for acute heart failure
Intravenous loop diuretics are the cornerstone of treatment of hospitalized heart failure patients (1-3). A poorer response to diuretic treatment was consistently related to worse outcomes. Poor renal function, low systolic blood pressure, ischemic etiology of heart failure, and diabetes are associated with poor diuretic response (DR) during 24-96 hours after hospital admission (4-6). Therefore, strategies to improve DR in hospitalized heart failure patients are currently being considered. However, some important information for these strategies are currently missing. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Shunsuke Kuroda, Kevin Damman, Jozine M. ter Maaten, Adriaan A. Voors, Takahiro Okumura, Keisuke Kida, Shogo Oishi, Eiichi Akiyama, Satoshi Suzuki, Masayoshi Yamamoto, Takeshi Kitai, Kazuki Yoshida, Akihiko Matsumura, Yuya Matsue Tags: Clinical Investigation Source Type: research

Rare Diseases Inform Myocardial Phenotypes for Precision Medicine
Friedreich's Ataxia (FA) is an autosomal recessive ‘triplet repeat’ disorder characterized by cerebellar degeneration, long tract and a generalized myopathy.1 While neurological symptoms typically antedate any clinical cardiac involvement, heart failure remains the dominant cause of death in FA. The genetic basis of the disorder is dramatic expa nsion of a GAA repeat sequence in the first intron of the FRDA gene which encodes an iron-binding mitochondrial protein whose function remains incompletely understood. (Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure)
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 13, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Calum A. MacRae Tags: Brief Report Source Type: research

A Critical Appraisal of Short-Term End Points in Acute Heart Failure Clinical Trials
The prevalence of heart failure continues to grow, and this is accompanied by an increase in hospitalization for acute heart failure. Hospitalization for heart failure results in a trajectory shift of the syndrome and is associated with worsening outcomes, increased mortality risk, and high costs. Numerous clinical trials over the past 2 decades have had limited success, with no single agent shown to improve mortality risk. The lack of success is multifactorial and in part related to inadequate targets and end points selected for intervention, underscoring the need to better understand and define the pathophysiology of acu...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 11, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Carine E. Hamo, Christopher O'Connor, Marco Metra, James E. Udelson, Mihai Gheorghiade, Javed Butler Tags: Review Article Source Type: research

A Critical Appraisal of Short-term Endpoints in Acute Heart Failure Clinical Trials
The prevalence of heart failure continues to grow and this is accompanied by an increase in hospitalization for acute heart failure. Hospitalization for heart failure results in a trajectory shift of the syndrome and is associated with worsening outcomes, increased mortality risk, and high costs. Numerous clinical trials over the past two decades have had limited success with not a single agent shown to improve mortality risk. The lack of success is multifactorial and in part related to inadequate targets and endpoints selected for intervention, underscoring the need to better understand and define the pathophysiology of a...
Source: Journal of Cardiac Failure - September 11, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Carine E. Hamo, Christopher O'Connor, Marco Metra, James E. Udelson, Mihai Gheorghiade, Javed Butler Tags: Review Article Source Type: research