Online interventions for sexual health in cancer
Purpose of review Recent advances in digital healthcare, combined with the increasing appreciation for the need for sexual health programming in cancer, has established a zeitgeist for further development of digital health interventions for sexual health in cancer. Developers of digital health interventions should consider two equally important factors: efficacy of the intervention, and participant engagement. This review describes the status of digital health interventions in sexual health within the oncology setting. Recent findings Sexual dysfunction and related psychological distress affecting patients and their p...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Online interventions to address body image distress in cancer
Purpose of review Body image is a critical psychosocial issue for patients with cancer, because of the profound effects the disease and its treatment can have on appearance and bodily functioning. Adverse psychological effects of body image changes associated with cancer include debilitating levels of anxiety, social avoidance, depression, problems with intimacy and impaired sexuality, and feelings of shame/inadequacy. The construct of body image is increasingly recognized as complex and multifaceted from an embodied lens, creating more meaningful and efficacious interventions. Although there is some evidence now for in-...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Online couple interventions in cancer
Purpose of review Cancer diagnosis and treatment can have long-lasting psychological and physical consequences that affect both patients and their intimate partners. Improved understanding of extant dyadic interventions in the context of cancer, and how access to these may be enhanced through web-based technologies, introduce new directions for how cancer-related psychological distress for couples may be ameliorated. Recent findings Couples are negatively impacted by cancer, both individually, and as a dyad. Bolstering techniques to support effective communication about common cancer-related concerns and support for a...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Online interventions geared toward increasing resilience and reducing distress in family caregivers
Purpose of review Family caregivers of patients with cancer often spend a great deal of effort on physically and emotionally demanding work while taking care of patients. However, the majority of caregivers are not properly equipped for their role as caregivers, which may lead to increased distress in both caregivers and patients. Herein, we reviewed the recent literature (last 3 years) examining online interventions that seek to support caregiver resilience and decrease distress. Recent findings Our search identified interventions involving three main themes: informational support, positive activities, and social sup...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Digital interventions for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors
Purpose of review AYA patients with cancer have a unique set of psychosocial and support needs to compared with their younger and older counterparts. Digital health interventions overcome many of the barriers to AYA participation in behavioral health interventions. Due to the rapid shifts in digital health, it is important to continually assess the state of the field. Recent findings There has been a sharp increase in the number of digital health interventions published in the literature. Interventions are using a variety of modalities and targeting many health behaviors and psychosocial outcomes. Most studies are foc...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Online psychosocial interventions for posttreatment cancer survivors: an international evidence review and update
Purpose of review The present review describes recent research on online psychosocial interventions for posttreatment cancer survivors from January 2018 to June 2019. Recent findings Twenty-three studies were included in the review (the majority included were feasibility studies and only five randomized controlled trials had large samples). Websites were the most common platforms for intervention delivery (9/23) and cognitive behavioral therapy was the most frequently used therapeutic approach (11/23). Three interventions based on this framework and delivered via websites or combined website-telehealth platforms showe...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Online interventions aimed at reducing psychological distress in cancer patients: evidence update and suggestions for future directions
Purpose of review A great proportion of people affected by cancer experience psychological distress. To reduce pressure on limited health-management resources available, evidence-based eHealth or online interventions can fill an important gap by making psychosocial care more easily accessible. However, evidence of their effectiveness is mixed. This present review provides an update on the effectiveness of online interventions in reducing psychological distress in patients with cancer by including studies published from January 2018 to September 2019. Recent findings Thirty-three publications describing online interven...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Editorial: Communication in cancer: its impact on the experience of cancer care
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: COMMUNICATION IN CANCER: ITS IMPACT ON THE EXPERIENCE OF CANCER CARE: Edited by Elie Isenberg-Grzeda and Janet Ellis Source Type: research

Facilitating supportive care in cardiac intensive care units
Purpose of review The number of patients who die in the hospital in the Western world is high, and 20–30% of them are admitted to an ICU in the last month of life, including those in cardiac ICUs (CICUs) where invasive procedures are performed and mortality is high. Palliative consultation is provided in only a few cases. The ethical and decisional aspects associated with the advanced stages of illness are very rarely discussed. Recent findings The epidemiological and clinical landscape of CICUs has changed in the last decade; the incidence of acute coronary syndromes has decreased, whereas noncardiovascular dis...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CARDIAC AND CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by James M. Beattie Source Type: research

Spirituality in heart failure: a review of the literature from 2014 to 2019 to identify spiritual care needs and spiritual interventions
Purpose of review The burden of heart failure is significant and its management is complex. Current evidence confirms a high level of spiritual distress and a strong desire for spiritual support, which is endorsed by healthcare policy, yet spiritual support is rarely provided for this patient group. There is a need to identify how spiritual support might be meaningfully included within holistic heart failure multidisciplinary care and how its effectiveness might be demonstrated. Recent findings A literature review was undertaken to identify recent evidence (2014–2019) of the spiritual care needs of heart failure...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CARDIAC AND CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by James M. Beattie Source Type: research

Social work involvement in palliative care heart failure research: a review of recent literature
Purpose of review The aim of the review is to examine the findings of empirical studies of palliative care interventions for patients with heart failure in which a social worker was identified as a key member of the interprofessional clinical team. Recent findings Our systematic review of the empirical literature from January 2016 to August 2019 found five palliative care interventions with heart failure patients that cited involvement of a social worker as a key team member. The reviewed studies highlighted social workers’ roles in the areas of psychosocial assessments and support, advance care planning, and pa...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CARDIAC AND CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by James M. Beattie Source Type: research

Editorial: Supportive care for people living with the manifold burden of heart failure
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CARDIAC AND CIRCULATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by James M. Beattie Source Type: research

Editorial introductions
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - January 30, 2020 Category: Palliative Care Tags: EDITORIAL INTRODUCTIONS Source Type: research

Mechanisms and treatment of bone pain in multiple myeloma
Purpose of review Multiple myeloma is a haematological malignancy of differentiated B lymphocytes, known as plasma cells. The disease is common in the UK (incidence of 9 cases per 100 000 people) and the most frequent presentation is bone pain caused by skeletal damage. Patients with myeloma also experience neuropathic pain induced by chemotherapy. The management of pain in multiple myeloma is frequently demanding and often sub-optimally addressed. This review seeks to summarize a rational approach to the management of pain experienced by multiple myeloma patients. Recent findings Bone pain has a dramatic detrimenta...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: BLOOD, BONE MARROW AND LYMPHATICS: Edited by Christopher Dalley Source Type: research

Ketamine and lidocaine infusions decrease opioid consumption during vaso-occlusive crisis in adolescents with sickle cell disease
This study evaluated the utility of ketamine and/or lidocaine in decreasing opioid consumption during acute pain episodes in adolescents with sickle cell disease. There has been an increased effort to promote opioid-sparing pain relieving methods given the ongoing opioid epidemic. Recent findings There have been six studies published over the past decade that highlight the ability of ketamine to reduce opioid consumption in the management of sickle cell disease-related pain, primarily in adult patients. There has been one study (2015) that demonstrated a similar benefit with lidocaine, however this was also in adult pat...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: BLOOD, BONE MARROW AND LYMPHATICS: Edited by Christopher Dalley Source Type: research

Autologous haematopoietic stem cell therapy for multiple sclerosis: a review for supportive care clinicians on behalf of the Autoimmune Diseases Working Party of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Purpose of review In this review, we summarize the recently published literature that demonstrates the efficacy and safety of autologous haematopoietic stem cell therapy (AHSCT) in multiple sclerosis (MS) and highlight the importance of supportive care required for the safe and well-tolerated delivery of AHSCT. Recent findings MS is an autoimmune inflammatory and degenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). In the majority of patients, the illness runs a relapsing remitting course (RRMS), culminating in a secondary progressive phase with gradual accumulation of fixed disabilities. Currently available dis...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: BLOOD, BONE MARROW AND LYMPHATICS: Edited by Christopher Dalley Source Type: research

Editorial: Expanding the indications for autologous stem cell transplantation: do we need a new approach to supportive care for patients with multiple sclerosis?
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: BLOOD, BONE MARROW AND LYMPHATICS: Edited by Christopher Dalley Source Type: research

Evaluating the effects of the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to manage delirium symptoms in palliative care patients: systematic review
Purpose of review There is a high prevalence of delirium in palliative care patients. This review aims to evaluate the effects of the pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions used to manage delirium symptoms in this patient group. Recent findings A recent study has suggested there is no role for antipsychotic medication in the management of delirium in palliative care patients, which is a move away from previous expert opinion. In addition, recent findings suggest there may be a role for the use of antipsychotics in combination with benzodiazepines in the management of agitated delirium. Summary It is t...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

Death rattle: reassuring harbinger of imminent death or a perfect example of inadequacies in evidence-based practice
Purpose of review Death is the inevitable consequence of life. Although clinicians are unlikely to accurately pinpoint when death is likely to occur in the people they care for, the death in a person with a diagnosis of malignant and nonmalignant tends to involve a period of predictable progressive clinical and functional deterioration. During this time, it is common for death rattle to occur. Due to its presentation, death rattle can cause stress and distress to caregivers. This often prompts clinicians to consider medical interventions that are not only ineffective in treating the problem but may also do harm. Recent ...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

Specific challenges in end-of-life care for patients with hematological malignancies
Purpose of review The disease-related burden of patients with hematological malignancies is comparable with patients suffering from solid tumors. Palliative care offers relief from suffering independent of type of disease and prognosis. The prevalence of hematological malignancies is expected to increase in the next 20 years because of better therapeutic options with longer survival and because of the aging population. However, patients with hematological malignancies are underrepresented in palliative care as these diseases are associated with special care needs and prognostic uncertainty, which differ from the unambigu...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

Dealing with prognostic uncertainty: the role of prognostic models and websites for patients with advanced cancer
Purpose of review To provide an updated overview of prognostic models in advanced cancer and highlight the role of prognostic calculators. Recent findings In the advanced cancer setting, many important healthcare decisions are driven by a patient's prognosis. However, there is much uncertainty in formulating prognosis, particularly in the era of novel cancer therapeutics. Multiple prognostic models have been validated for patients seen by palliative care and have a life expectancy of a few months or less, such as the Palliative Performance Scale, Palliative Prognostic Score, Palliative Prognostic Index, Objective Prog...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

Measuring the success of interventions for caregivers: a focussed systematic review
Purpose of review The selection and application of outcome measures are fundamental steps in the research process because they inform decisions around intervention efficacy. We aimed to describe the outcomes used in trials of supportive interventions for adult caregivers of people with three exemplar life-limiting conditions: heart failure, dementia or stroke. Recent findings We performed a focussed review of 134 published trials that included interventions designed to improve caregivers’ health and wellbeing and/or ability to function in their caring role. We extracted and categorized all caregiver outcomes des...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

Withdrawing noninvasive ventilation at end-of-life care: is there a right time?
Purpose of review The purpose of this review is the ‘when’ and ‘how’ of the matter of withdrawing noninvasive ventilation (NIV) at end-of-life (EoL) setting, having in mind the implications for patients, families and healthcare team. Recent findings Several recent publications raised the place and potential applications of NIV at EoL setting. However, there are no clear guidelines about when and how to withdraw NIV in these patients. Continuing NIV in a failing clinical condition may unnecessarily prolong the dying process. This is particularly relevant as frequently, EoL discussions are starte...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

The value of the ethnographic approach to research issues in palliative care
Purpose of review Qualitative research in the field of palliative care allows for a crucial study of the final stage of life from a social point of view and cultural perspective. This review evaluates the advantages and challenges of applying an ethnographic approach to palliative care research. Recent findings Thirteen ethnographic articles on organization or quality of care, decision-making, delirium, death, and the process of dying, were reviewed. Most studies use interviews, participant observation, and field notes as their primary data collection techniques. In ethnographic research, cultural issues, relationship...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

What information and resources do carers require pre and post bereavement in the acute hospital setting? A rapid review
Purpose of review: This mixed-method, rapid review of published research from 2014 to 2019 aims to explore the experiences of pre and postbereaved carers, and the information that they receive in the acute hospital setting. The quality of articles was evaluated using a standardized quality matrix. The techniques of conceptual analysis and idea mapping were used to create a structured synthesis of the findings. Recent findings: From the initial search of 432 articles, ten studies met the inclusion criteria for this review. These studies generated data from 42 patients, 1968 family/carers and 139 healthcare staff. Theme...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: END OF LIFE MANAGEMENT: Edited by Gustavo De Simone and Bridget Johnston Source Type: research

Meaningful measures in cancer cachexia: implications for practice and research
Purpose of review Cancer cachexia is a complex inflammatory syndrome, which presents with a variety of discrete symptoms and signs. This creates a challenge for both clinicians and researchers in recognizing and assessing the syndrome. This review explores the evidence for various measures used in the assessment of cachexia. Recent findings Objectively, cachexia may be assessed using CT-derived measures of skeletal muscle [skeletal muscle index (SMI) and skeletal muscle density (SMD)]. Evidence suggests that SMD may be of equal or greater value than SMI in assessing cachexia. Inflammatory markers are also used, and in...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Cancer cachexia in thoracic malignancy: a narrative review
Purpose of review Thoracic malignancies are amongst the most lethal of all cancers. Cancer cachexia lacks unanimously accepted diagnostic criteria, and therefore is referenced to as a conceptual framework whereby cancer cachexia is ‘an ongoing loss of skeletal muscle mass (termed sarcopenia), with or without loss of fat mass that cannot be reversed by conventional nutritional support and leads to progressive functional impairment’. This review summarises the current evidence base in this field, including imaging techniques currently used to define sarcopenia, inflammatory and metabolic changes associated with...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Dietetic assessment and intervention in lung cancer
Purpose of review Systemic therapy for lung cancer is increasing in intensity and duration. European nutrition guidelines suggest screening for weight loss and malnutrition, however acknowledges there is a lack of evidence. We discuss current data round this issue and identify opportunities for further research. Recent findings International guidelines now exist to aid the definition of weight loss in cancer, including cachexia, sarcopenia and malnutrition. These allow consistent definition of overlapping, but distinct clinical syndromes. Nutritional status can be assessed in a range of ways including questionnaires, ...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

From cachexia to obesity: the role of host metabolism in cancer immunotherapy
Purpose of review Currently, several clinical trials in cancer therapy have demonstrated the success of immunomodulatory therapies. However, only a variable fraction of patients actually benefit from these treatments. The understanding of key mechanisms behind this response heterogeneity is one of the major unmet need and intense research field in immuno-oncology. This review will discuss the host metabolic dysfunctions derived from cachexia or obesity that can affect the response to cancer immunotherapy. Recent findings Preclinical studies demonstrated that chronic inflammation, nutritional intake impairment and endo...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Cardiac cachexia: the mandate to increase clinician awareness
Purpose of review Heart failure is a frequent problem in an ageing population, associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Today, it is important to not only treat heart failure itself but also the related comorbidities. Among them, cardiac cachexia is one of the major challenges. It is a complex multifactorial disease with a negative impact on quality of life and prognosis. Therefore, prevention, early recognition and treatment of cardiac cachexia is essential. Recent findings Cardiac cachexia frequently presents with skeletal as well as heart muscle depletion. Imaging-based diagnostic techniques can help ...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Cancer cachexia and treatment toxicity
Purpose of review Cancer cachexia is a metabolic disturbance resulting in a loss of skeletal muscle mass that is generally not reversed through traditional nutritional interventions. We review on both the impact of nutritional status on cancer treatment side effects, as well as cancer- specific outcomes. Recent findings Cancer-specific cachexia and sarcopenia are associated with increased treatment-associated toxicity, and overall worse cancer-specific outcomes across all cancer types in surgical, chemotherapeutic, and radiotherapeutic populations. Despite the fact that cancer cachexia is generally thought to be irrev...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Endocrinopathies and cancer cachexia
Purpose of review Cancer cachexia cannot be easily reversed by standard nutritional support and interventions directed at underlying metabolic derangements may be needed to prevent or reverse cachexia and maintain healthy body composition. The following review will highlight the contribution and potential therapeutic interventions for insulin resistance, alterations in ghrelin signaling, and hypogonadism in cancer patients. Recent findings In addition to decreased caloric intake, chronic inflammation, and altered metabolism of glucose, proteins and lipids, endocrine abnormalities can propagate weight loss or changes i...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Sarcopenia: looking to muscle mass to better manage pancreatic cancer patients
Purpose of review Overall survival of patients with pancreatic cancer is strongly conditioned by tumor biology and the incidence of malnutrition and metabolic disorders. In this landscape, the assessment of body composition is crucial to properly manage the clinical implications of muscle wasting. The pathogenesis of this condition is the result of a complex interplay between cancer and the host. In particular, sarcopenia is induced by an inadequate nutritional intake, hormonal abnormalities, inflammation and imbalance between anabolic and catabolic pathways. Recent findings Recent evidences have highlighted the role ...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Editorial: Merging therapeutics and supportive care: synergy and yield
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: CACHEXIA, NUTRITION AND HYDRATION: Edited by Aminah Jatoi and Barry J.A. Laird Source Type: research

Editorial introductions
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - November 4, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: EDITORIAL INTRODUCTIONS Source Type: research

Myofascial pain syndrome and trigger points: evaluation and treatment in patients with musculoskeletal pain
Purpose of review Myofascial pain syndrome is a chronic pain condition characterized by the presence of myofascial trigger point, a hyperirritable painful spot involving a limited number of muscle fibers. The literature suggest that myofascial trigger points should be considered peripheral pain generators and this critical review will summarize recent findings concerning the clinical evaluation and the treatment of myofascial trigger points. Recent findings The clinical features of myofascial trigger points and their contribution to the patient pain and disability have been detailed in several recent studies, which su...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: MUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS: Edited by Roberto Casale and Piercarlo Sarzi Source Type: research

Interventions for myofascial pain syndrome in cancer pain: recent advances: why, when, where and how
Purpose of review Pain is one of the most feared and most common symptoms of cancer, experienced by 38–85% of patients. Pain in terminally ill cancer patients is a multidimensional experience caused by a diverse array of factors – cancer itself, its treatment or other causes. Studies have shown a high incidence of myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) in patients with cancer and the knowledge of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) is important to address and manage existing pain, and to prevent the recurrence of pain. This review aims to summarize recent advances in interventions for managing MPS in patients with canc...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: MUSCULOSKELETAL PROBLEMS: Edited by Roberto Casale and Piercarlo Sarzi Source Type: research

Cytoreductive nephrectomy in metastatic kidney cancer: what do we do now?
Purpose of review Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has traditionally been treated with a combination of targeted systemic therapy and cytoreductive nephrectomy. This approach has recently become a topic of debate, because of new randomized data suggesting a lack of survival benefit for cytoreductive nephrectomy. We review the literature relevant to cytoreductive nephrectomy in the modern era of targeted and immune systemic therapy, and discuss the ongoing role of surgery for treatment of patients with mRCC. Recent findings Randomized trials in the cytokine era of systemic therapy for mRCC demonstrated a survival...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RENAL AND UROLOGICAL PROBLEMS: Edited by Fred Saad Source Type: research

Treating advanced penile cancer: where do we stand in 2019?
Purpose of review Penile squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) remains a challenging malignancy to treat and there is an urgent need of significant improvements at all levels of medical care. In the current review, we summarized the significant obstacles encountered during management of PSCC and discussed the clinical relevance of novel findings and their potential to address these obstacles. Recent findings The recent genetic and immunological advances suggest that patients with PSCC can benefit from available targeted therapy and immunotherapy options. Moreover, evidence has accumulated over time suggesting that majority o...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RENAL AND UROLOGICAL PROBLEMS: Edited by Fred Saad Source Type: research

Treating the primary in metastatic prostate cancer: where do we stand?
Purpose of review Traditionally, local treatment was reserved for palliative control of symptoms in men with metastatic prostate cancer. In the past few years there have been many advances in the systemic options available. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence in support of treating the primary tumor despite the presence of metastatic disease. Recent findings There is a wealth of retrospective studies demonstrating advantages of local treatment [radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy (RT)] in metastatic disease. As these studies are prone to bias, treatment of the primary in the metastatic setting has...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RENAL AND UROLOGICAL PROBLEMS: Edited by Fred Saad Source Type: research

Caring for the informal cancer caregiver
Purpose of review Informal cancer caregivers play a vital role in the physical, functional, and emotional well being of cancer patients. However, the majority of informal caregivers are not prepared for their caregiving role. We reviewed and synthesized the recent literature (last 18 months) and focused on research in the following understudied areas: technology-driven interventions for informal caregivers; informal caregivers of older adults with cancer; interrelationship between informal caregiver and dyadic outcomes; and research priorities and guidelines to improve informal caregiver support. Recent findings Studi...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: LIVING WITH CANCER AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF TREATMENT: Edited by Lynn Calman and Natasha Campling Source Type: research

Recent research on the social network concept and cancer
Purpose of review This review covers articles in 2018 and early 2019 that employed the concept of networks and social interactions in research on how patients with cancer cope, receive and respond to medical treatment and allied support. The use of social aspects, and more formally the method of social network analysis for research on social aspects of cancer is quite new. Although we paid special attention to articles that used formal social network analysis, we noted that those articles cover just over a quarter of the material we reviewed. Most articles that incorporated social aspects of cancer did not intend to form...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: LIVING WITH CANCER AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF TREATMENT: Edited by Lynn Calman and Natasha Campling Source Type: research

Multimorbidity in older adults living with and beyond cancer
Purpose of review The current review draws attention to the need for longer term management of multiple conditions in older adults with cancer. Recent findings Older people living with and beyond cancer are more likely than younger people to have higher prevalence of multimorbidity leading to an overall increase in illness and treatment burdens, limiting health-related quality of life (QoL), and capacity to self-manage. Older age presents a higher risk of cancer treatment side-effects and development or progression of other conditions, leading to worsening health, long-lasting functional problems, and social isolation...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: LIVING WITH CANCER AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF TREATMENT: Edited by Lynn Calman and Natasha Campling Source Type: research

Living with cancer and multimorbidity: the role of primary care
Purpose of review As more people live longer with cancer, the number of patients with cancer and multiple other chronic conditions (multimorbidity) has increased. The presence of multimorbidity impacts on all stages of cancer care, from prevention and early detection through to end of life care, but research into cancer and multimorbidity is in its infancy. This review explores the impact of multimorbidity on adults living with (and beyond) cancer, with particular attention paid to the role of primary care in supporting patients in this situation. Recent findings Patterns of multimorbidity vary depending on cancer typ...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: LIVING WITH CANCER AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF TREATMENT: Edited by Lynn Calman and Natasha Campling Source Type: research

Editorial: Complexity when living with cancer
No abstract available (Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care)
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: LIVING WITH CANCER AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF TREATMENT: Edited by Lynn Calman and Natasha Campling Source Type: research

Breathlessness and the brain: the role of expectation
Purpose of review Breathlessness debilitates countless people with a wide range of common diseases. For some people, the experience of breathlessness is poorly explained by the findings of medical tests. This disparity complicates diagnostic and treatment options and means that disease-modifying treatments do not always have the expected effect upon symptoms. These observations suggest that brain processing of respiratory perceptions may be somewhat independent of disease processes. This may help to explain the dissonance observed in some patients between physical disease markers and the lived experience of breathlessnes...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by Sam H. Ahmedzai and Magnus Ekström Source Type: research

Interdisciplinary management of chronic breathlessness
Purpose of review Breathlessness is a common yet complex symptom of advanced disease. Effective management will most likely draw upon the skills of multiple disciplines and professions. This review considers recent advances in the management of chronic breathlessness with regards to interdisciplinary working. Recent findings There are growing data on interventions for chronic breathlessness that incorporate psychosocial mechanisms of action, for example, active mind–body treatments; and holistic breathlessness services that exemplify interprofessional working with professionals sharing skills and practice for us...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by Sam H. Ahmedzai and Magnus Ekström Source Type: research

Multidimensional measurement of breathlessness: recent advances
Purpose of review Breathlessness is a multidimensional sensation for which a range of instruments exists for children, youth and adults, capable or unable to self-report distress with breathing. This review presents developments and applications of multidimensional assessments of breathlessness. Recent findings Excluding unidimensional measures and instruments assessing the impact of breathlessness, at least eight psychometrically robust instruments exist, which comprehensively assess one or more specific domains of the sensation of breathlessness (intensity, sensory quality, affective distress). These instruments hav...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by Sam H. Ahmedzai and Magnus Ekström Source Type: research

Why treatment efficacy on breathlessness in laboratory but not daily life trials? The importance of standardized exertion
Purpose of review Treatments for chronic breathlessness, including opioids and oxygen, have shown efficacy in the controlled laboratory setting, whereas effects have been inconsistent or absent in trials in daily life. This review discusses the lack of standardized exertion as a potential cause of false negative findings for breathlessness in daily life. Recent findings The level of breathlessness can be modified by patients by changing their level of physical activity. Effects of opioids and oxygen have been shown at standardized level of exertion (iso-time) but not at the end of symptom-limited (peak) exertion. Tria...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by Sam H. Ahmedzai and Magnus Ekström Source Type: research

Supplemental oxygen for the management of dyspnea in interstitial lung disease
This article presents a summary of the evidence relating to supplemental oxygen use for the management of dyspnea in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Recent findings In contrast to the majority of the available literature, recent findings suggest that supplemental oxygen can significantly reduce exertional dyspnea in ILD. ILD patients’ need for supplemental oxygen often surpasses the levels that the most commonly used oxygen delivery systems provide. More effective delivery of supplemental oxygen has the potential for greater relief of dyspnea. There is also evidence suggesting that indications for s...
Source: Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care - August 2, 2019 Category: Palliative Care Tags: RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS: Edited by Sam H. Ahmedzai and Magnus Ekström Source Type: research