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A perturbed skin microbiome can be 'contagious' and promote inflammation, Penn study finds
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new study, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have shown for the first time that, not only can infection with the Leishmania parasite alter the skin microbiome of affected mice, but this altered microbial community can be passed to uninfected mice that share a cage with the infected animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists reveal structure of potential leishmaniasis vaccine
Leishmaniasis, caused by the bite of a sand fly carrying a Leishmania parasite, infects around a million people a year around the world. Now, making progress toward a vaccine against the parasitic disease, researchers have characterized the structure of a protein from sand flies that can convey immunity to Leishmania. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists reveal structure of potential leishmaniasis vaccine
(PLOS) Leishmaniasis, caused by the bite of a sand fly carrying a Leishmania parasite, infects around a million people a year around the world. Now, making progress toward a vaccine against the parasitic disease, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have characterized the structure of a protein from sand flies that can convey immunity to Leishmania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 9, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Persistent infection keeps immune memory sharp, leading to long-term protection
For many infectious diseases, a single bout of the illness protects a person against contracting it again. Sometimes, the infecting microbe persists in the body long after symptoms resolve. Now, researchers studying the tropical parasite Leishmania have found a clue to explain the link between long-term immunity and long-term infection: The parasite is constantly multiplying and being killed by immune cells, keeping the immune system alert and prepared for any new encounters with the parasite. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - January 16, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Persistent infection keeps immune memory sharp, leading to long-term protection
(Washington University School of Medicine) For many infectious diseases, a single bout of the illness protects a person against contracting it again. Sometimes, the infecting microbe persists in the body long after symptoms resolve. Now, researchers studying the tropical parasite Leishmania have found a clue to explain the link between long-term immunity and long-term infection: The parasite is constantly multiplying and being killed by immune cells, keeping the immune system alert and prepared for any new encounters with the parasite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Sandfly spit vaccinates mice against leishmaniasis infection
A vaccine against cutaneous leishmaniasis, a skin infection caused by Leishmania parasites, may be spitting distance away -- sand fly spit, that is. Saliva from a species of the fly responsible for transmitting leishmaniasis can be used to vaccinate mice against the infection, researchers have shown. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - November 3, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Insecticide treatment of cattle to kill sand flies and combat leishmaniasis
With an estimated 500,000 human infections and 50,000 deaths annually, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the second most prevalent parasitic killer, behind malaria. Leishmania parasites are transmitted through the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. A study makes the case that fighting the insects by treating cattle with the long-lasting insecticide, fipronil, could substantially reduce VL in areas where people and cattle live in close proximity. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 18, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Insecticide treatment of cattle to kill sand flies and combat leishmaniasis
(PLOS) With an estimated 500,000 human infections and 50,000 deaths annually, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is the second most prevalent parasitic killer, behind malaria. Leishmania parasites are transmitted through the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. A study published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases makes the case that fighting the insects by treating cattle with the long-lasting insecticide, fipronil, could substantially reduce VL in areas where people and cattle live in close proximity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 18, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Leishmania virulence strategies
Medical researchers have discovered novel virulence strategies employed by the Leishmania parasite. These scientific breakthroughs represent two important clues to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the parasitic infections that cause leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease endemic in one hundred countries. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

INRS professor's team unveils new Leishmania virulence strategies
( Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS ) Professor Albert Descoteaux of INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier Research Centre and his team have discovered novel virulence strategies employed by the Leishmania parasite. These scientific breakthroughs recently published in the prestigious PLOS Pathogens journal represent two important clues to understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing the parasitic infections that cause leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease endemic in one hundred countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 28, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Black fever beats drugs by adding just two DNA bases to its genome
Scientists identify how certain strains of the fatal neglected tropical parasite Leishmania donovani have become immune to drug treatment. The addition of just two bases of DNA to the gene LdAQP1 stops the organism from absorbing antimonial drugs. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - March 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Black fever beats drugs by adding just two DNA bases to its genome
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) In eLife, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists identify how certain strains of the fatal neglected tropical parasite Leishmania donovani have become immune to drug treatment. The addition of just two bases of DNA to the gene LdAQP1 stops the organism from absorbing antimonial drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New iron transporter essential for Leishmania parasite virulence is potential drug target
(PLOS) Leishmaniasis is a serious parasitic disease that affects 12 million people worldwide. Like for many neglected tropical diseases that disproportionately affect poor populations, existing drugs have serious side-effects and face increasing parasite resistance. A study published on Jan. 7 in PLOS Pathogens identifies a new drug target, and supports the conclusion that iron-dependent signals generated in the mitochondria are essential for the development of parasite stages that cause disease in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 7, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How parasites take a bigger bite
A team of international scientists uncovered an important mechanism behind Leishmania, a deadly parasitic disease transmitted by sandflies. In a new study, researchers described how key molecules known as exosomes, boost the process by which the Leishmania parasite infects humans and other mammals. These findings could lead to the development of new potential vaccine targets and diagnostic tools. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 22, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Infection Assistants
Parasite-derived exosomes boost Leishmania infection in mice.  (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - October 22, 2015 Category: Science Tags: The Scientist, Daily News, News & Opinion Source Type: news

How parasites take a bigger bite
(McGill University Health Centre) A team of international scientists led by the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre uncovered an important mechanism behind Leishmania, a deadly parasitic disease transmitted by sandflies. In a new study published today in Cell Reports, researchers described how key molecules known as exosomes, boost the process by which the Leishmania parasite infects humans and other mammals. These findings could lead to the development of new potential vaccine targets and diagnostic tools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Lingering lymphocytes lash out against leishmania
Immune cells that hang around after parasitic skin infection help ward off secondary attack. These skin squatters may prove to be the key to successful anti-parasite vaccines. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Lingering lymphocytes lash out against Leishmania
(Rockefeller University Press) Immune cells that hang around after parasitic skin infection help ward off secondary attack. These skin squatters may prove to be the key to successful anti-parasite vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 27, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Drug Delivery: Lessons to Be Learnt From Leishmania StudiesDrug Delivery: Lessons to Be Learnt From Leishmania Studies
Recent studies on treatment for leishmaniasis can serve as models for increasing our understanding of drug delivery systems, as well as facilitating novel ways of improving drug efficacy and delivery. Nanomedicine (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pathology & Lab Medicine Journal Article Source Type: news

A Transposon-Based Tool for Transformation and Mutagenesis in Trypanosomatid Protozoa
The ability of transposable elements to mobilize across genomes and affect the expression of genes makes them exceptional tools for genetic manipulation methodologies. Several transposon-based systems have been modified and incorporated into shuttle mutagenesis approaches in a variety of organisms. We have found that the Mos1 element, a DNA transposon from Drosophila mauritiana, is suitable and readily adaptable to a variety of strategies to the study of trypanosomatid parasitic protozoa. Trypanosomatids are the causative agents of a wide range of neglected diseases in underdeveloped regions of the globe. In this chapter w...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Microbiology - November 13, 2014 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Separation of Basic Proteins from Leishmania Using a Combination of Free Flow Electrophoresis (FFE) and 2D Electrophoresis (2-DE) Under Basic Conditions
Basic proteins, an important class of proteins in intracellular organisms such as Leishmania, are usually underrepresented on 2D gels. This chapter describes a method combining basic proteins fractionation using Free flow electrophoresis in isoelectric focusing mode (IEF-FFE) followed by protein separation using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in basic conditions. The combination of these two techniques represents a great improvement for the visualization of Leishmania proteins with basic pI using 2D gels. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Microbiology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Microbiology - November 13, 2014 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

RNA-Seq Approaches for Determining mRNA Abundance in Leishmania
High-throughput sequencing of cDNA copies of mRNA (RNA-seq) provides a digital read-out of mRNA levels over several orders of magnitude, as well as mapping the transcripts to the nucleotide level. Here we describe an RNA-seq approach that exploits the 39-nucleotide mini-exon or spliced leader (SL) sequence found at the 5′ end of all Leishmania (and other trypanosomatid) mRNAs. (Source: Springer protocols feed by Microbiology)
Source: Springer protocols feed by Microbiology - November 13, 2014 Category: Microbiology Source Type: news

Leishmaniasis Parasitic Disease - Symptoms Treatment and Prevention
The disease is classified as a, 'Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD).' Leishmaniasis is caused by infection with Leishmania parasites, which are spread by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies. There are a number of forms of leishmaniasis that affect people. The most common forms include visceral leishmaniasis, which affects several internal organs such as a person's liver, spleen and bone marrow, as well as cutaneous leishmaniasis which causes skin sores. (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - July 27, 2014 Category: Disability Tags: Health and Disability Source Type: news

The human parasite Leishmania is a probiotic for the fly that carries it
(BioMed Central) The Leishmania parasite, which causes the human disease leishmaniasis, acts as a probiotic in the insect that transmits it to humans, protecting them from bacterial disease. Findings published in the open-access journal Parasites and Vectors suggest that using bacterial controls to stop the spread of leishmaniasis could sometimes have the opposite effect to that intended, by benefiting flies carrying the parasite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2014 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FDA approves Impavido to treat tropical disease leishmaniasis
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Impavido (miltefosine) to treat a tropical disease called leishmaniasis.Leishmaniasis is a disease caused by Leishmania, a parasite which is transmitted to humans through sand fly bites. The disease occurs primarily in people who live in the tropics and subtropics. Most U.S. patients acquire leishmaniasis overseas. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 21, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in a Central American Refugee
We report a case of cutaneous leishmaniasis in a 49-year-old male who presented to our emergency room for evaluation of an ulcerative lesion on his finger. Microscopic examination of a Giemsa-stained touch preparation from the finger lesion showed intracellular protozoa suggestive of Leishmania species. The protozoan was recovered by culture from a biopsy specimen, and its identity was subsequently confirmed as Viannia (Leishmania) panamensis by using molecular methods. (Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter)
Source: Clinical Microbiology Newsletter - January 23, 2014 Category: Microbiology Authors: Helen Jacoby, Russell A. Rawling, Paul A. Granato Source Type: news

Tracking risk of Visceral Leishmaniasis exposure in Brazil's urban areas
Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe chronic systemic disease caused by the protozoa (Leishmania infantum) in South America, the Mediterranean, southwest and central Asia. These parasites lodges in defense cells and compromises the spleen, liver and bone marrow, becoming fatal if left untreated. The parasites are transmitted to human and animal hosts by the bite of phlebotomine sand flies with dogs as the main urban reservoirs... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 4, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

New anti-leishmanial drug candidate
Leishmaniasis is a vector borne disease caused by different Leishmania species with different clinical manifestations. Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is endemic and widespread especially among young individuals in Iran. Currently prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines are not available, and in spite of vector control wherever possible, the disease has not been controlled. Although the majority of zoonotic CL cases heal within 6-9 months, anthroponotic cases persist much longer... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 21, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Association between treatment failure and Leishmania parasites with greater infectivity
Relapses after treatment for Leishmania infection may be due to a greater infectivity of the parasite rather than drug resistance, as has been previously thought, according to a study published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. Visceral leishmaniasis, also called kala-azar, is a parasitic disease that strikes 400,000 people every year and kills around 1 in 10 of its victims... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news

Leishmania parasites with greater infectivity associated with treatment failure
(American Society for Microbiology) Relapses after treatment for Leishmania infection may be due to a greater infectivity of the parasite rather than drug resistance, as has been previously thought, according to a study published in mBio®, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Local Antimony Shots Effective Against Cutaneous LeishmaniasisLocal Antimony Shots Effective Against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis
Intralesional injections of antimony are significantly more effective than cryotherapy or placebo in dealing with single lesions caused by Bolivian Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Dermatology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Dermatology Headlines - February 25, 2013 Category: Dermatology Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

New handle on drug-resistant leishmaniasis
The Leishmania parasite uses a sugary secretion to outwit the human immune system and resist antimony drugs, say researchers. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - February 1, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Animal Model for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis
Using cutaneous leishmaniasis of mice, the existence of so-called T helper (Th) cells type 1 and type 2 had been identified more than 20 years ago. Nowadays, it is well accepted that additional T cell populations as well as B cell-mediated immunity is required for immunity against Leishmania major. Finally, using inbred mouse strains, the relevance of genetical factors that influence anti-pathogen immunity as well as elements of the skin-immune system have been identified. This protocol describes a model for murine experimental leishmaniasis that tries to mimic natural parasite transmission by several means: (1) utilizatio...
Source: Springer protocols feed by Molecular Medicine - December 19, 2012 Category: Molecular Biology Source Type: news