Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 246
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 246 Readers can subscribe to FFFF RSS or subscribe to the FFFF weekly EMAIL Question 1 What is so special about this watch and who invented the concept? + Reveal the funtabulous answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet1125060832'));expand(document.g...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - July 26, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Basedow disease Battle's incision Battle’s sign Cardioversion doplr watch Graves disease John Floyer Parry's disease physicians watch pulsometer Royal Humane Society tattoo-to-teeth ratio William Henry Bat Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 306
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 306th LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week RebelEM unleashes his top 10 pearls from ACEP17 [LP] EPMonthly published an ER acco...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - November 13, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review #FOAMped #FOAMresus #FOAMsim #FOAMus #meded FOAMcc FOAMed LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

LITFL Review 303
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Welcome to the 303rd LITFL Review! Your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peeks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the blogosphere’s best and brightest and deliver a bite-sized chunk of FOAM. The Most Fair Dinkum Ripper Beauts of the Week Kenneth Palmer from Karolinska shares his 30-plus years of ECMO experience in a podcast ...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - October 22, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marjorie Lazoff, MD Tags: LITFL review LITFL R/V Source Type: blogs

Keeping Anxiety at Bay: My Arsenal of Recovery
Looking back on my childhood, there was never really a time I wasn’t unsure of myself. I never thought I was cute enough, smart enough, funny enough or fun enough. In fact, I doubted that any of my playmates actually liked me. On my birthday, I wondered whether my friends would actually show up to my party. And if they did, was it because my parents paid them to come? If so, how much? How much was I worth? Decades later, I realize this was one of the first indications that I suffered from anxiety. Through countless hours of therapy, research and reflection, I have come to understand the many manifestations of anxiet...
Source: World of Psychology - April 5, 2017 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Elizabeth Penney Tags: Anxiety and Panic Medications Personal Psychotherapy Self-Esteem Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Hypertension overwhelm Panic Attack Paranoia Psychology self-worth Suffering Worry Source Type: blogs

Ten Years In
My first day as an attending general surgeon in Cleveland, Ohio was August 7th, 2006. I saw one patient with a hernia in the office that day and then, around 430 pm, the call came in from the pediatric ER about a kid with abdominal pain. Some healthy 17 year old boy with obvious early appendicitis. I booked the case, tip-toed my way through the laparoscopic appendectomy uneventfully and went home feeling awful proud of myself. It was exactly how I envisioned a life as a general surgeon. I had been a confident 5th year resident. I hadn't done a fellowship. I had felt ready. I was read...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - March 3, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD FACS Source Type: blogs

Notes to myself – 2
Pentobarb coma – BIS should be 10-20 and SR (suppression ratio) should be 70-80 Consider lev albuterol Should give vaccines after coiling of spleen or before if possible No calcium channel blockers post MI definitely and post op in general Toradol inhibits spine healing Don’t do endoscopes with patients in supine position don’t ambulate patients with known dvt’s. wait 2-3 days until clots get stuck. dvt’s even with filter get heparin as much as possible for post phlebitic syndrome and to retard new clot formation diffuse alveolar hemorrhage – secondary to chemo, goodpasture’s, wege...
Source: Inside Surgery - December 31, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Editor Tags: General Source Type: blogs

The Coming Future of Surgical Robotics: Interview with CEO of TransEnterix
TransEnterix is a late stage surgical robotics company founded in 2006. The company is dedicated to improving clinical outcomes through the use of robotics in surgery. TransEnterix acquired the surgical robotics division of SOFAR S.p.A in 2015 which included the TELELAP ALF-X advanced robotic system. TransEnterix is now focusing on commercialization of this platform as the Senhance robotic system. We had the opportunity to sit down with the CEO of TransEnterix, Todd Pope, to discuss the future of surgical robotics and positioning of the Senhance system in the market. William Kethman, MD, Medgadget: Can you tell us about Tr...
Source: Medgadget - November 4, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: William Kethman Tags: Cardiac Surgery Exclusive Ob/Gyn Thoracic Surgery Urology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Google thinks I sell mobile homes. But I ’m a hernia surgeon.
Are you 100 percent sure your customers know where you are located? If you are like me, you think the answer is an obvious “yes.” But in reality, I did not have a clue because I wasn’t aware of local SEO. SEO, traffic and ranking on the “first page of Google” are what marketing agencies stress to physicians, but I found out there is a side branch of SEO called local SEO. So, I started asking questions like: Why doesn’t my hernia practice ever show up in that map box on Google? Why am I getting such a small amount of phone calls when I am the top website hit on Google? The short answer:...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 10, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/jeff-eakin" rel="tag" > Jeff Eakin, MD < /a > Tags: Social media Surgery Source Type: blogs

Fortimedix Surgical ’s Laparoscopic FMX314 Introduces Two Instruments Via Single Trocar
Fortimedix Surgical, a company with offices in Nuth, The Netherlands and Rancho Santa Fe, California, won FDA clearance to bring to market its FMX314 laparoscopic surgical system. The device provides surgeons the opportunity to use two instruments at once via a single port in the abdomen. The device is inserted via a standard 15 mm trocar, while controls outside the body closely mimic traditional laparoscopic equipment that make it seem like two different tools within their own trocars are being used. Since the port is a common size and doesn’t require a wider incision, patients will hopefully benefit from fewer...
Source: Medgadget - August 29, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Editors Tags: Ob/Gyn Surgery Urology Source Type: blogs

How Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds Influence Cell Behavior in Therapies
This study showed us that the matrix bound vesicles are clearly active, can influence cellular behavior and are possibly the primary mechanism by which bioscaffolds cause tissue regrowth in the body." Link: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2016-07/uops-prs072816.php (Source: Fight Aging!)
Source: Fight Aging! - July 29, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Tips for patients to help ensure an accurate diagnosis
If you weren’t aware of the prevalence and severity of diagnostic errors, (misdiagnosis, missed diagnosis, delayed diagnosis) maybe you should be now. The Institute of Medicine (IOM) released a new report called, Improving Diagnosis in Health Care. The report cited that most people will experience one or more diagnostic errors over their lifetimes. It also revealed that diagnostic errors contribute to 10 percent of patient deaths and account for up to 17 percent of hospital adverse events. In addition, diagnostic errors are the leading type of paid medical malpractice claims. Because of a scarcity of reporting a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 14, 2015 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Tags: Patient Hospital Malpractice Source Type: blogs

Start-up pitches high-tech glue for surgical leaks
TEL AVIV — An Israeli medical-device start-up is tackling one of the most dangerous occurrences in surgery — and it's doing it with glue.LifeSeal is a glue-like substance that augments and, in some surgeries like hernias, replaces the traditional and painful sealing procedures of staples, tacks and sutures.The privately-owned Israeli company behind the high-tech glue, LifeBond, says it should help in the treatment of post-operative leaks in closures of gastrointestinal and other surgical wounds. Patients get back up to speed more quickly and are more comfortable as they do.Orahn Preiss-Bloom, one of LifeBond's ...
Source: Medical Hemostat - November 16, 2014 Category: Technology Consultants Authors: hemostatguy at gmail.com (hemostat guy) Source Type: blogs

The LITFL Review 128
The LITFL Review is your regular and reliable source for the highest highlights, sneakiest sneak peaks and loudest shout-outs from the webbed world of emergency medicine and critical care. Each week the LITFL team casts the spotlight on the best and brightest from the blogosphere, the podcast video/audiosphere and the rest of the Web 2.0 social media jungle to find the most fantastic EM/CC FOAM (Free Open Access Meducation) around. Welcome to the 128th edition, brought to you by: Kane Guthrie [KG] from LITFL Tessa Davis [TRD] from LITFL and Don’t Forget The Bubbles Brent Thoma [BT] from BoringEM,...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 4, 2014 Category: Emergency Medicine Doctors Authors: Chris Nickson Tags: eLearning Featured Intensive Care Pediatrics Toxicology #FOAMped #FOAMtox #meded FOAMcc FOAMed LITFL R/V LITFL review Source Type: blogs

Notes to myself – 2
Pentobarb coma – BIS should be 10-20 and SR (suppression ratio) should be 70-80 Consider lev albuterol Should give vaccines after coiling of spleen or before if possible No calcium channel blockers post MI definitely and post op in general Toradol inhibits spine healing Don’t do endoscopes with patients in supine position don’t ambulate patients with known dvt’s. wait 2-3 days until clots get stuck. dvt’s even with filter get heparin as much as possible for post phlebitic syndrome and to retard new clot formation diffuse alveolar hemorrhage – secondary to chemo, goodpasture’s, wege...
Source: Inside Surgery - December 31, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Trick for Nearly Instant Flat Abs: Balloons?
Don't worry, that's not a "before" and "after" pic.image: wikipediaSo when I was online digging up various sorts of strangeness for the Weirdest Weight Loss post, I came across a "Daftest Diet" article from the Daily Mail. It included a tip from the book "Six Weeks to OMG: Get Skinnier than All Your Friends," which sounds, overall, highly annoying.But a tip it offered seemed intriguing: it's a simple way to engage and strengthen the transversus abdominis muscles.As you are probably aware, your transverse abs are the handy muscles deep inside that pull your belly in, and probably...
Source: Cranky Fitness - December 23, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Crabby McSlacker Source Type: blogs

Where you stand depends on where you sit
I know from personal interactions that the CEO of Steward Health Care System has an excellent sense of humor.  But he certainly cannot have meant to be funny when he appeared at the state health cost trends hearings hosted last week by the state Health Policy Commission and appealed to the state to enact more health cost containment legislation that would further limit prices for higher-cost doctors and hospitals.  Julie Donnelly at the Boston Business Journal summarized:The demand for additional regulation is somewhat unusual given that de la Torre is the CEO of one of the few for-profit health systems in the st...
Source: Running a hospital - October 6, 2013 Category: Health Managers Source Type: blogs

Weighing the Benefits and Risks of Breast Reconstruction Surgery After Mastectomy
By Fonthip Maspithak  Breast cancer is no longer the death sentence it was decades ago. Improved medical interventions result in more survivors – even with the most aggressive forms of cancer. While women are concerned for their health, they may also be concerned about restoring the appearance of their breasts, leading them to consider breast reconstruction – a procedure performed after a mastectomy to restore the breast to its original size and shape. While it has risks, new methods provide women with greater and safer options to regain their previous shape.  Breast reconstruction is a major per...
Source: Sciences Blog - June 19, 2013 Category: Science Authors: srinivas_s at omicsgroup.co.in (OMICS Publishing Group) Tags: General Source Type: blogs

FLASH CARD: Pulmonary Sequestration
Extralobar sequestrations have systemic arterial supply (usually from the aorta) as well as systemic drainage (usually into the IVC, azygous, hemiazygous, or the portal vein), thus creating a L to R shunt (functionally it is an AVF).  90% are related to the left hemidiaphragm.  It possesses its own pleural investment and 30% are associated with diaphragmatic hernias.  They may also communicate with the GI tract.   They are congenital Intralobar sequestrations occur most commonly in the lower lobes (usually the left) and are infrequently associated with other anomalies.  Their arterial supply is via...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - June 11, 2013 Category: Radiologists Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

Chris Christie Lap Band Surgery
We are following with interest the news reports today of the Chris Christie lap band surgery. Although we are not participating in his care, some general information on what lap band or laparoscopic gastric banding and typical clinical issues to be considered is detailed below. Lap band surgery is a commonly performed surgical operation done for the control of morbid obesity. It is best performed by experienced bariatric surgeons and is sometimes referred to as the “mini” weight loss surgery. However, while the surgery is not as extensive as the roux-en-Y reconfiguring of the gi tract, it is a operation that i...
Source: Inside Surgery - May 7, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Medical News Wire Chris Christie gastric surgery lap band surgery weight loss surgery Source Type: blogs

Marfan’s Disease
Pathophysiology of Marfan’s disease Marfan’s disease is 1) disease of connective tissue 2) marked by dilation of aorta and aortic dissection in a young person Signs and Symptoms 1) tall stature with long lower torso 2) long limbs and digits 3) pectus carinatum (pigeon breast) 4) inguninal hernias 5) hypermobile joints 6) severe chest pain 7) lightheadedness 8) retinal detachment 9) myopia 10) bilateral subluxation of lines in outward and upward direction (ectopia lentis) 11) aortic regurgitation 12) mitral prolapse and “floppy” mitral valve 13) abnormal head (enlarged supraorbital ridges) 14) kypho...
Source: Inside Surgery - March 17, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Editor Tags: Pediatrics Surgpedia ectopia lentis FBN1 lens subluxation rfibrillin 1 Source Type: blogs

Interview: Phillip Hornbostle,MD Bariatric Surgeon
This is the first in a series of  interviews I plan on publishing.  Dr Phillip M. Hornbostel, M.D., FACS, FASMBS is an accomplished bariatric surgeon in Missouri who has performed thousands of weight loss procedures over the years.  He is also the resident dean of the commentariat at the physician-only social media website Sermo.  The following represents a series of email exchanges he and I had over the holidays: Dr Hornbostel, tell me about your professional journey from general surgeon to an exclusively bariatric practice.  I finished general surgery residency in 1984 and immediately wen...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - January 22, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD Source Type: blogs

Who Decides on Surgery?
The American Journal of Surgery had a nice little (38 patient cohort) study from the VA database that tried to determine the process by which patients make informed decisions on elective surgery.  The results were rather surprising, at first glance.    Sixty-nine percent of patients decided to have surgery before meeting their surgeon, and 47% stated that the surgeon did not influence their decision. Although the surgeon was an important source of information for most patients (81%), patients frequently described using information gathered before meeting the surgeon, such as other healt...
Source: Buckeye Surgeon - January 16, 2013 Category: Surgeons Authors: Jeffrey Parks MD Source Type: blogs

Towards 2013: A Bullet List
Ah, 2013. A New Year...full of hopes & resolutions. Some people do 'em,some don't. I do, because I like to attempt to improve my personal habits..even if I fail.(to try & to fail is to better to have never tried at all) I want 2013 to be my year..& I want it to be others too. Here are some of my hopes for the coming year.1. I want to get my thyroid back in whack (still hypo)& my health back.( whatever that was) I've had recent issues with heartburn & difficulty swallowing, for which I just had an EGD done(biopsy results pending,normal appearing mucosa, a medium sized hiatal hernia)Diabetes related gastr...
Source: The D-Log Cabin - January 4, 2013 Category: Diabetes Authors: HVS Source Type: blogs