Portugal Parliament Approves 5 Bills Legalizing Medically Assisted Death
Portugal’s parliament voted in favor of allowing euthanasia and medical aid in dying for terminally ill people. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A principalist argument against heritable genome editing
In May of 2019 The New Bioethics carried a paper (purchase or subscription required) by Jennifer Gumer of Columbia and Loyola Marymount Universities, summarizing an argument against heritable genome editing (the kind in which an embryo’s genes are edited so that the change will be passed down to the subject’s descendants), based on Belmont principalism.  … Continue reading "A principalist argument against heritable genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

“Living robots”: Ethical questions about Xenobots
by Simon Coghlan, Ph.D. and Kobi Leins, Ph.D. Xenobots have been called “novel living machines” and “living robots”. A co-author of the paper that recently introduced xenobots, said: They’re neither a traditional robot nor a known species of animal. [They’re] a new class of artefact: a living, “programmable organism”. These “reconfigurable organisms” have already provoked philosophical and ethical questions. Xenobots are under 1mm in size and composed of 500-1000 cells from frog (Xenopus laevis) embryos. After culturing extracted embryonic stem cells, micro-s...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Environmental Ethics Featured Posts Philosophy & Ethics Science Technology Source Type: blogs

Supreme Court Rules Guardian Can Authorize Withdrawing Life Support without Court Approval
This week, the Supreme Court of New Hampshire issued a decision holding that court approval is not needed for a guardian's request to remove a patient from life support. The guardian’s general authority includes the decision to end life support. Especially where there is consensus among the guardian, the patient's attorney, and the hospital, a judge’s involvement is "neither necessary nor warranted." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bioethicist Lecture to Look at Medical Aid in Dying Possibilities in Illinois
A presentation that assesses why a proposal that would allow terminally ill patients to obtain medical assistance to end their lives should be passed by the Illinois General Assembly is the focus of the 2020 John and Marsha Ryan Bioethicist in Residence lecture next week at Southern Illinois University Carbondale.  Thaddeus Mason Pope, director of the Health Law Institute at Mitchell Hamline School of Law, will present “Medical Aid in Dying: Assessing the Illinois Patient Choices at End of Life Act.”  The lecture is at 5 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the SIU School of Law in Carbondale. The lecture is ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Simon ’ s Laws – Strong v. Weak Varieties
More state legislatures are considering Simon's Law. Bills are pending in Idaho (H.B. 519), Michigan (H.B. 5476), and other states. But a closer look at the bills and statutes (in Arizona, Kansas, Missouri, and other states) shows that there are two f... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Dr Neil Armstrong – Why is Mental Healthcare so Ethically Confusing
In the first St. Cross seminar of the term, Dr. Neil Armstrong talked about ethical challenges raised by mounting bureaucratic processes in the institutional provision of mental healthcare. Drawing on vignettes from his ethnographic fieldwork, Dr. Armstrong argued that the bureaucratization of mental healthcare has led to a situation in which the provision of care […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jonathan Pugh Tags: Health Care Jonny Pugh's Posts medical ethics podcasts syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

British Court of Appeal Upholds Brain Death (Midrar Ali)
Last week, the British Court of Appeal released a press summary of its judgment in the case of Midrar Ali v. Manchester University NHS Trust. This week, the court posted the full judgment. In short, the court sustained the trial court judgment. 1. It ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Assessing and Respecting Sentience After Brexit
Thanks to a generous grant from Open Philanthropy, last year the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics and the Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities co-sponsored a workshop with the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) examining the ethical and legal implications of recent advancements in our ability to assess the mental […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Adam Shriver Tags: Animal Ethics Health Care Adam Shriver's Posts Brexit Sentience syndicated Source Type: blogs

Justified without Justice in the Realities of Warfare
STUDENT VOICES | A Reflection on The 2019 National Conference on Ethics in America at West PointBy Marla Hasin Imagine being stuck in a coffin-like box, with just enough room to feel the rise of your chest as you inhale. You attempt to look at your chest, but you are halted by the thump of […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Justice CIA consequentialism Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Fordham University Student Voices Master of Arts in Ethics and Society Opinion Philosophical Ethics philosophy syndicated torture Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Avoiding Compassion Fatigue: Drain Less, Recharge More
By Eran Magen You open yourself up to the pain of others, in order to be a comforting presence in the middle of a terrible experience. It helps them, and it drains you. It is exhausting to experience so much secondhand suffering. Over time, it sucks the color out of your own life, leaves you […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: reflectivemeded Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Advancing Slippery Slope of Organ Donation and Euthanasia
The timing of organ donation relative to death of the donor is critical to the survivability and future functioning of the donated organs in the transplant recipient. With cardiovascular death, circulation ceases in the donor causing his or her death, making it legally and ethically permissible to retrieve the organs for donation. Unfortunately, cardiovascular death … Continue reading "The Advancing Slippery Slope of Organ Donation and Euthanasia" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics Euthanasia; Slippery Slope Arguments; human dignity organ donation syndicated Source Type: blogs

USMLE Step 1 Goes Pass/Fail: What Happens Now for U.S. Medical Students?
by Julia Knopes, Ph.D. Recently, the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) announced that the USMLE Step 1 exam for medical students will change its score reporting from a numeric score to pass/fail as of 2022. This news signals a substantial shift for medical education in North America and in particular the United States, as numeric Step 1 scores have been traditionally used to screen the most competitive applicants for physician residency programs. My hope is that the change in Step 1 scoring may lead to more holistic residency applications, as well as reduced medical student burnout when facing these life-altering ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Education Ethics Featured Posts Professionalism Step ! USMLE Source Type: blogs

Globalized Science in a Deglobalizing World
The arrest of Harvard chemist and nanobiologist Charles Lieber on charges of lying about his research funding from China encapsulates two phenomena currently in tension: the global nature of modern science and attempts to nationalize the fruits of science. The post Globalized Science in a Deglobalizing World appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Science Charles Lieber China global research Hastings Bioethics Forum nationalism Science and Society syndicated Source Type: blogs

Of Risks and Benefits
Among the most fundamental concerns regarding medical, biomedical, and bioethical decision making are the concepts of risk and benefit. Of course, benefit is better than risk so this might seem to be a fairly easy balance to calculate. But it is not. I... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Author: Kaplan risk syndicated Source Type: blogs

It ’s My Right: The Handmade Death of Herta Sturmann (VSED Video)
Watch this 25-minute film of a patient who does VSED. "My mother had congestive heart failure and decided not to submit herself to the indignities of medical intervention. When she got too weak to get out of bed, she decided to stop eating and drinking (in German it’s called Sterbefasten or Death Fast, in the US it’s called VSED – Voluntarily Stopping Eating and Drinking)." "My outspoken mother insisted I film our family as we navigated this fraught process together. My brother and I cared for her round the clock during the ten days it took her to die at home. We then washed her body, set h...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Leveraging Video Technology to Enhance Patient Safety and Deliver Concordant Care
Join me on Wednesday, February 19, 2020, for a C-TAC webinar, "Leveraging Video Technology to Enhance Patient Safety and Deliver Concordant Care." My talk is based on my forthcoming article: "Video Advance Directives: Growth and Benefits of Audiovisual Recording." This will be in a symposium issue of the SMU Law Review celebrating the 30th anniversary of Cruzan. Advance care planning conversations are the first step in ensuring that people communicate their preferences and goals of care, but how can we make sure that those wishes are understood and honored?  TRIAD VIII was the first evidence-based ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying (NCCMAID) – Day 2
NCCMAID has been valuable. I have had the opportunity to meet both prescribing and consulting physicians from almost every state where it is available. I got a chance to catch up with leading Canadian clinicians like Stephanie Green and Ellen Wiebe. ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying: Six Variations in U.S. State Laws (video)
This is a practice video of a presentation ("Medical Aid in Dying: Six Variations in U.S. State Laws") that I am doing, this morning, for the National Clinicians Conference on Medical Aid in Dying (NCCMAID) at U.C. Berkeley. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 14, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Chinese Bioethicists: Silencing Doctor Impeded Early Control of Coronavirus
The death of Dr Li Wenliang from COVID-19 is heartbreaking for our country and people. Dr. Li was reprimanded for messages he posted in a chat group warning fellow doctors about a mysterious infection. His death from coronavirus underscored gaps and deficiencies in our country’s health care system and system of governance. The post Chinese Bioethicists: Silencing Doctor Impeded Early Control of Coronavirus appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care coronavirus COVID-19 Dr. Li Wenliang global health Hastings Bioethics Forum syndicated Source Type: blogs

Advance Directives for Oral Food and Fluids
I have written about how the new Nevada advance directive form specifically permits individuals to direct the forgoing of food and water by mouth.  In contrast, West Virginia is taking the opposite approach. The current status of a VSED directive... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Spain Advances Euthanasia Bill
Many years ago, I lived in Madrid during my junior year in high school. Therefore, it is a surprise (given the giant presence of the Catholic Church) to hear that the Spanish Parliament has voted 203 to 140 to advance a bill to allow euthanasia and ass... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from an infant and rights of conscience
The is currently a legal (and ethical) debate in Texas over the treatment of a one-year-old infant, Tinslee Lewis (see articles in the Hastings Center Bioethics Forum and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram). Tinslee was born prematurely with a congenital heart defect and subsequent severe lung disease. She has had multiple surgeries and is on a … Continue reading "Withdrawing life-sustaining treatment from an infant and rights of conscience" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics end of life Health Care Practice Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Heritable Human Genome Editing Can Cure or Prevent Diseases
By César Palacios-González @CPalaciosG  More than a year after the fallout from He Jiankui’s announcement to the world that he had edited human embryos in order to made them resistant to HIV, the debate on whether we should move ahead with heritable human genome editing has given no signs of slowing down. For example, just a […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: César Palacios-González Tags: Ethics Genetics Health Care bioethics César Palacios-González's Posts CRISPR CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing genome editing He Jiankui Heritable Human Genome Editing syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Right Not to Know and the Obligation to Know
By Ben Davies Most people accept that patients have a strong claim (perhaps with some exceptions) to be told information that is relevant to their health and medical care. Patients have a Right to Know. More controversial is the claim that this control goes the other way, too. Some people claim, and others deny, that […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ben Davies Tags: Ethics Health Care professional ethics autonomy choice knowledge medical ethics rights syndicated Source Type: blogs

Responsibility, Healthcare, and Harshness
Written by Gabriel De Marco Suppose that two patients are in need of a complicated, and expensive, heart surgery. Further suppose that they are identical in various relevant respects: e.g., state of the heart, age, likelihood of success of surgery, etc. However, they differ on one feature: for one of these patients, call her Blair, […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Gabriel De Marco Tags: Ethics Health Care Gabriel De Marco's posts medical ethics responsibility syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cook Children ’ s Ethics Committee Member Concedes TADA Flaws
Late last month, Stuart Pickell write an op-ed in the Forth Worth Star-Telegram on the ongoing Tinslee Lewis case. Dr. Pickell is chairman of the Tarrant County Academy of Medicine Ethics Consortium and a member of Cook Children’s Medical Center’s ethics committee. While defending the dispute resolution provisions in the Texas Advance Directives Act, Dr. Pickell actually concedes much of what the case is really about.  First, Dr. Pickell explicitly acknowledges: "The Texas Advance Directives Act is imperfect." That is fine. Many other defenders of TADA concede as much. This is...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 12, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly Patient Modesty) Volume 109
JR wrote today in Volume 108 "Many man don't like how they are treated but don't know it should be done differently. Some are ashamed of what happened and thus remained silent."  and but this why "speaking up" both to the profession and to fellow ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

One In Four Cancer Survivors Can ’t Afford Their Medical Care–And We’re Blaming The Wrong People
According to a recent CDC survey, one in four cancer survivors struggle to pay their medical bills. An even higher number worry about whether they’ll be able to scrounge up the money to pay off their out-of-pocket healthcare costs. I’m quite comfortable blaming the healthcare industry, writ large, for this problem. Healthcare prices in the United […] The post One In Four Cancer Survivors Can’t Afford Their Medical Care–And We’re Blaming The Wrong People appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health care cost Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tinslee Lewis – Appellate Oral Argument
Last Tuesday, February 4, 2020, the Texas Second Court of Appeals held oral argument in the Tinslee Lewis case. A recording of the 49-minute argument is here. A key issue in the case is the existence of state action. Only with state action is constitu... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Neoliberal Policies Challenge the Constitutional Right to Health in Brazil
by Alexandre A. Martins, Ph.D. Imagine an effective and efficient universal health care system that delivers care to low-income families. Now imagine dismantling that program to further marginalize those same families. This scenario raises questions of global health disparities that threatens justice. Removing access to care for low-income families is a problem in the U.S. where Medicare work requirements restrict access and where efforts to undermine the Affordable Care Act mean fewer people can sign for insurance. Globally, the same problem is occurring in Brazil with implementation of neoliberal policies that foster the...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Alexandre Martins Tags: Featured Posts Global Ethics Health Care Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Politics Public Health Social Justice Source Type: blogs

Religion and Refusal of Medical Care for Children
Two children (Kent and Brandon Schaible) have died of treatable pneumonia and dehydration because their parents (Herbert and Catherine Schaible) resorted to prayer instead of medical care.  In another particularly egregious case, members of the Faith Assembly Church denied medical care to a 4-year-old with an eye tumor the size of the child’s head.  Law enforcement officials found blood trails along the walls of the girl’s home where she, nearly blind, used the walls to support her head while navigating from room to room.  Seth Asser and Rita Swan have documented 172 cases of child deaths from pr...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bioethics Today Tags: Health Care Pediatrics Author: Brummett religion syndicated Source Type: blogs

Deciding When Enough is Enough in Caring for a Child
Tinslee Lewis, a critically ill 1-year-old girl born with a rare heart defect and severe lung disease, has spent her entire life in the intensive care unit at Cook Children’s Hospital in Texas and undergone multiple surgeries in attempts to save her life. Tinslee’s care team has determined that she has no chance for any meaningful survival and that ongoing intensive care is harmful and causing her undue suffering. They recommend withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment, against the parent’s wishes. Tinslee’s fate is being debated in court. The post Deciding When Enough is Enough in Caring for a Chil...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care end of life Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care Life Sustaining Treatment syndicated Tinslee Lewis Source Type: blogs

Charlie ’ s Law in UK Parliament Would Require Mediation of Treatment Conflicts
For decades, scores of courts have observed that "the truly ideal solution" for medical treatment disputes is for parties to "resolve their differences privately, on their own, with the aid of medical and clerical advice, and not have to resort to expe... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Can Treatment for a Dead Baby Be in His Best Interest?
In early October 2019, clinicians at Manchester University Hospital determined that Midrar Namiq was dead. But, more than four months later, he is still in the hospital. At the end of January 2020, the High Court ruled that clinicians could ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 9, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

UK High Court Rules Life-Sustaining Treatment Not in Baby ’ s Best Interest
Mrs. Justice Lieven has now posted the reasons for her December 2019 declaration that had been sought by Rotherham NHS Trust in the case of 2-month-old Baby X. Baby X was born with hydraencephaly, meaning that some of his brain was not fully formed. T... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Facebook, M.D.: When Social Media Replaces Medical Advice
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D. Like others in our WebMd culture I often go to the internet to research my symptoms, looking for possible solutions. When a physician gives me a medical diagnosis I will often go to the internet and research the diagnosis. The internet was particularly helpful when I fractured my ankle and when I was going through dermatological therapies. While I was going through therapies for these injuries and disorders what I found was that the internet’s greatest contribution was its communities of people who had some of the same experiences as myself.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Cultural Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Justice Pediatrics Pharmaceuticals Public Health Social Justice Social Media Source Type: blogs

Medicare Pays More Money To Doctors Taking Care Of Rich Patients. Here ’s Why.
It has always been financially rewarding for doctors to take care of rich patients. People with more money…well, they have more money to spend on healthcare. But shouldn’t this more money/higher payment relationship go away in Medicare? It doesn’t, and some recent payment reforms may be making matters worse. (To read the rest of the […] The post Medicare Pays More Money To Doctors Taking Care Of Rich Patients. Here’s Why. appeared first on Peter Ubel. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: peter Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

More Secret DNR (DNACPR) Orders in the UK
It is one thing to write a DNR order without patient or family consent. Sometimes, that is justified when CPR will be medically ineffective. But it is another thing altogether to write the DNR order without even the knowledge of the patient or family.  Despite the British appellate courts (in Tracey) declaring this practice illegal, it apparently continues. This week, Vivian Lloyd accuses (and here) NHS Lanarkshire of “playing God” with patients, after a Do Not Resuscitate order was placed on her mum without her knowledge. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

An argument for heritable genome editing
Some weeks ago, a utilitarian perspective in favor of heritable genome editing was published (purchase or subscription required to read).  In it, the author, Kevin Smith of Abertay University in the United Kingdom, begins with a general defense of utilitarianism, the ethical philosophy that what is morally good is what produces the greatest good for … Continue reading "An argument for heritable genome editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 7, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs