Brain Death: A Medicolegal Construct: Scientific & Philosophical Evidence
A major two-day conference in Rome will critically examine brain death: "Brain Death: A Medicolegal Construct: Scientific & Philosophical Evidence." Sessions include: Brain Death Is Not Death: Clinical Experience Apnea Test Procedure Versus Aggr... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The new WHO advisory panel on human gene editing
By Jon Holmlund The World Health Organization (WHO) has empaneled an expert advisory committee to propose standards for governance and oversight of human gene editing. This group is to meet in Geneva on March 18 and 19 to review the state of the field, broadly, and formulate a plan for its work, over the ensuing … Continue reading "The new WHO advisory panel on human gene editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care bioethics biotechnology enhancement Ethical Method / Grounding reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

When Children of the Anti-Vax Movement Want Immunizations: A Challenge for Pediatric Bioethics
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. A teenager comes to a medical clinic and asks for an MMR vaccine. Although this particular vaccine is usually given at 12-15 months of age with a second dose at ages 4-6 years, this 16-year-old has never been vaccinated. His parents believe that vaccines cause autism* and are dangerous, therefore they have never vaccinated their children. In the age of the internet, the teen has done a lot of research and found that the science is conclusive: Vaccines are safe and beneficial (as long as you are not allergic to the ingredients).… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Pediatrics vaccinations Source Type: blogs

Impact of Alfie Evans Case on United States Law
Iowa House File 233 has passed its first legislative committee. The bill says that a court cannot order the withdrawal of life-sustaining procedures from a minor child over the objections of the parents. The bill sponsor, Rep. Jon Jacobsen, explains that the poster boy for the legislation was Alfie Evans, a British 23-month-old with a degenerative brain condition who died in April 2018 after a court ordered — over the objections of his parents — that life support be withdrawn. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 21, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Savior Siblings for a “Noble Cause”
STUDENT VOICES By Elizabeth Andersen Originally named ‘medicine babies,’ savior babies have been a more recent discovery in the medical world, presenting families with a quick fix to dealing with terminally ill children. In 2015, the Journal of Medical Ethics wrote a piece on ‘Savior Siblings’ and the ethical implications that arise when considered as […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Technology bioethics biotechnology Contemporary Ethical Issues Fordham University Student Voices law medicine My Sister's Keeper Savior Sibling syndicated Source Type: blogs

Multiple Marginalizations: What Bioethics Can Learn From Black Feminism
by Amal W. Cheema, Karen M. Meagher & Richard R. Sharp Through special arrangement with Taylor & Francis, AJOB posts its editorials on bioethics.net. This essay and the articles it references are also available on the publisher website. Increasing the visibility of marginalized voices is fundamental to bioethics. Toward this end, various feminist and critical-race theories have provided insights into the experience of disability and illness. Yet as individual frameworks, each of these theoretical vantage points can fall short in capturing lived experiences shaped by multiple marginalizations.…...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Research Ethics Social Justice empirical bioethics intersectionality Source Type: blogs

Want to Reduce Opiate Overdoses? Legalize Medical Marijuana
I have written about medical marijuana before, relaying research findings showing that the legalization of medical marijuana is associated with a reduction in use of pain medications. Here’s another piece of evidence leading to a similar conclusion, from a study … Continue reading → The post Want to Reduce Opiate Overdoses? Legalize Medical Marijuana appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Human Rights in End of Life Care Conference
Sue Ryder is hosting a free conference on human rights in end of life care on Thursday, June 27, 2019, in London. This full-day event explores how applying a human rights approach to end of life care practice can help deliver person-centred and compas... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 20, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

What Dr. Seuss Saw at the Golden Years Clinic
“Improving patient experience” has become the mantra of many health care facilities in a highly competitive and regulated environment. But just what is it about the patient experience that needs to be improved?  Will better food and gift bags do the trick? Or are more basic changes required? To answer that question, I turned to… Read more The post What Dr. Seuss Saw at the Golden Years Clinic appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care aging Arts & Ideas Chronic Conditions and End of Life Care Dr. Suess Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care syndicated You're Only Old Once!: A Book for Obsolete Children Source Type: blogs

Insurers Are Not Paying Enough For HPV Vaccines – And Our Kids Are Paying The Price
The HPV vaccine saves lives. It does so by reducing a person’s chance of being infected by the human papilloma virus, a virus that causes a whole range of cancers including, most importantly, cervical cancer. Vaccinate your teenage daughter against … Continue reading → The post Insurers Are Not Paying Enough For HPV Vaccines – And Our Kids Are Paying The Price appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Health & Well-being health policy Peter Ubel syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

25th Annual Conference of the Healthcare Ethics Consortium
DiscussionTara Adyanthaya, JD, MBE, TLA Healthcare Ethics Consulting; Morris Manning &Martin, LLP(Overview/framing speaker and  Moderator)       Hannah Hamby, LMSW, ACM-SW, Social Worker, Emory HealthcareTim Hedeen, PhD, Professor of Conflict Management, Kennesaw State University Bryan Kibbe, PhD, HEC-C, Clinical Ethicist, WellStar Health SystemCharity Scott, JD, Catherine C. Henson Professor of Law, Georgia State University College of Law 2:50   Does Informed Consent Exist - and What Does the Future Hold?Dr. Ben Stoff, MD, MA, Associate Professor of Dermatology, Emory School of ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Informed Consent and Genetic Germline Engineering
By Mark McQuain I recently read, with admittedly initial amusement, an article from The Daily Mail that described a young man of Indian decent who was intending to sue his parents for giving birth to him “without his consent.” Raphael Samuel, a 27 year-old who is originally from Mumbai, is part of a growing movement … Continue reading "Informed Consent and Genetic Germline Engineering" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care bioethics biotechnology Consent / Research enhancement human dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

University of Kentucky Bioethics Conference
Join me for the University of Kentucky Bioethics Conference in Lexington, on May 10, 2019. I will be discussing "The Evolving Legal Status of Medical Aid in Dying." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bioethics in Post-Acute and Long Term Care – It ’ s Not Just for Hospitals
Most U.S. hospitals have an ethics mechanism. But bioethics committees and consultants are far less common in long-term and post-acute care settings. Karl Steinberg is working to fill this gap. In the February 2019 issue of Provider magazi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Jahi McMath Dismisses Her Federal Lawsuit
The family of Jahi McMath dismissed their state medical malpractice lawsuit in September 2018. After Jahi's death on circulatory criteria, the value of the case dropped to within settlement range. But the family had continued their federal lawsui... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Presidents Deserve Medical Standard of Care
by Bandy X. Lee Is Donald Trump capable of protecting the interests of the United States?  Is he capable of keeping the country safe without placing it in further danger?  Is he capable of discharging the duties of his office?  These are not comfortable questions to ask, but they are the most fundamental, and a growing number of mental health professionals and non-professionals are asking them.  Just as signs of likely criminal involvement have led to investigations through the Special Prosecutor’s office, signs of likely mental incapacity should lead to a proper examination by mental health exper...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Psychiatric Ethics medical physical Trump Source Type: blogs

Announcement: Final Presentation for the 5th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics
It is with great pleasure that we announce the finalists in the Oxford Uehiro Prize for Practical Ethics 2019, and invite you to the final presentation and reception. The 5th Annual Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics Final Presentation and Reception HT19 Week 8, Wednesday 6th March, 4:30 – 5:45 pm. The Presentation will be held […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Health Care Announcements Oxford Uehiro Prize in Practical Ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Montana House Votes to Recriminalize Medical Aid in Dying
While other states (notably Maine, New Jersey, and New Mexico) are working toward legalizing medical aid in dying; Montana is moving toward delegalizing it.  On Thursday, February 14, 2019, the House voted to legislatively overrule the 2009 Baxte... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Summarizing ethical issues with heritable human gene editing
By Jon Holmlund A brief recap of reasons why we should not pursue heritable human gene editing: It seems unlikely that risks to immediately-treated generations can be predicted with the accuracy we currently and reasonably expect from human subject research and medical practice. Risks to later generations, that is, to the descendants of edited people, … Continue reading "Summarizing ethical issues with heritable human gene editing" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Jon Holmlund Tags: Genetics Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics biotechnology enhancement human dignity reproduction syndicated Source Type: blogs

Patient Dignity (Formerly: Patient Modesty): Volume 95
Ray B. said in Volume 94:If you believe Steven Miles, M.D. (“Oath Betrayed: Torture, Medical Complicity and the War of Terror”) the answer is, “All of them.” That’s hardly evidence of outliers. At the same time, however, there is reason to believe, from Milgram’s study, that the people who commit evil acts may, in fact, be outliers – it depends on the situation. And so where are we, as patients and our dignity, within the medical system? ..Maurice.Graphic: From Google Images and modified by me with Art Rage. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Simon ’ s Law Advances in South Dakota – No DNR over Parental Objection
Many state legislatures are considering "Simon's Law" bills this session. South Dakota H.B. 1055 has unanimously passed the House and is now in the Senate. "Like other bills a parental objection "precludes the physician from instituting an o... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Hastings Center at 50: Looking Back and Ahead
This year, The Hastings Center will celebrate its 50th anniversary. The Center was first located on the second floor of my house in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y., with some overflow paperwork stored at the home of my neighborhood friend and cofounder, Willard Gaylin. Neither of us had ever run an organization or raised money. I am a… Read more The post The Hastings Center at 50: Looking Back and Ahead appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care bioethics Hastings Bioethics Forum Hastings Center 50th anniversary Hastings Center founding History of Bioethics Mildred Solomon Strachan Donnelley syndicated Thomas Murray Willard Gaylin Source Type: blogs

Graphic Medicine: Making Comics at NYU School of Medicine
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Lucy Bruell Tags: Health Care Literature Arts and Medicine Blog SOM Voices syndicated Source Type: blogs

Re-criminalizing Medical Aid in Dying in Montana
The Montana Legislature is considering a bill that would re-criminalize medical aid in dying after 10 years of decriminalization. Yesterday, the House Judiciary Committee passed H.B. 284 / L.C. 2356. The bill now goes to the full House for a vote on s... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Backup Plan for Solos: Health Care Decision Making for People Aging Alone
The Citizen's League has just released a 50-page report, Backup Plan for Solos: Health Care Decision Making for People Aging Alone. I was delighted to play a small role. "As people age, they often need assistance with health care decisions. Historically, family members have provided such assistance. It is not always clear who can and will be available to assist those aging alone or to serve as their health decision agents if they cannot speak for themselves. Without a plan or a supportive infrastructure, “solos” are at risk for lack of care, sub-optimal care, or care that goes against t...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Rise in Chinese Research Raises Call for Updated Human Subjects Protections
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Move over United States, China is the new research powerhouse. In the last few months, announcements out of China talk about the first live human births from genetically edited embryos; the birth of 5 cloned, genetically edited monkeys, and most recently, announced the development of an artificial intelligencethat is more accurate than human doctors at diagnosing diseases in children. Why this sudden surge in Chinese science and what does that mean for human subject research protection?… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Cultural Featured Posts Global Ethics Human Subjects Research & IRBs Stem Cells Technology Source Type: blogs

Medical Aid in Dying in US State Legislatures 2019
The Death with Dignity National Center has summarized MAID in the 2019 legislative session. Bills in New Mexico and New Jersey have already passed key committees. Below, the green states are where MAID is already legal. The tan states are where bills ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The expansion of euthanasia in the Netherlands
Dr. Steve Phillips Ever since advocates for euthanasia began making arguments that euthanasia was morally permissible and should be legal, their arguments have begun by picturing a person who is near death from a disease that is causing severe pain. Then they argue that out of respect for the autonomy of and compassion for that … Continue reading "The expansion of euthanasia in the Netherlands" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: mwilliams Tags: Health Care bioethics Euthanasia; Autonomy; Human Dignity syndicated Source Type: blogs

The #10YearChallenge: Harmless Fun or Cause for Concern?
by Olya Kudina and Lori Bruce                                                       Online social spaces maintain an increasing presence in our lives. Yearly, people upload around 1.2 trillion photos on social media and share personal stories and milestones through their social networks. It is fair to say that online communications are here to stay. The #10YearC...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Featured Posts Privacy Technology Source Type: blogs

A Surprisingly Easy Way To Become Happier
What makes people happy? A load of studies tell us that human interaction is key to our happiness. But what kind of interactions matter?  And does interaction increase everyone’s happiness, or is it something primarily beneficial to extraverts? A fantastic study set out to … Continue reading → The post A Surprisingly Easy Way To Become Happier appeared first on PeterUbel.com. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: PeterUbel.com Tags: Health Care Health & Well-being Peter Ubel syndicated Source Type: blogs

Take Back Control? Doctors as Appointed Fiduciaries
Written by Ben Davies There’s a story that’s often told about the evolution of the doctor-patient relationship. Here’s how it goes: back in the bad old days, doctors were paternalists. They knew what was best, and the job of the patient was simply to do as they were told and hopefully get better. Then, in […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ben Davies Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care medical ethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

At the End of Life: Agency, Role and Responsibilities of the Physician/Advanced Practitioner
At the End of Life: Agency, Role and Responsibilities of the Physician/Advanced Practitioner   Registration is open for this national, two-day conference, Sept. 13-14, 2019, in Seattle.   Physicians and advanced practitioners have the privilege and duty to care for patients at the end of life. Sometimes their actions factor into a patient’s death; such as discontinuing life support (including ventilators, cardiac d...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (February 4-8, 2019): #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed, #GreysAnatomy
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 13): A risky organ transplant; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 14):Face Transplant; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 13): Suspecting the worst; HIV safety or stigmatization; Suspicion and stealing from patients; Jump to Greys Anatomy (Season 15; Episode 12): Removing Dying Patient’s Autonomy The Resident (Season 2; Episode 13): A risky organ transplant Eloise is a third year medical student in need of a double lung transplant as a result of her cystic fibrosis.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Decision making End of Life Care Featured Posts HIV/AIDS Informed Consent Organ Transplant & Donation Privacy Source Type: blogs

83% of Physicians Agree Terminally Ill Patients Should Sometimes Be Permitted to Try Any Possible Treatment They Wish
In late 2018, over 5000 physicians across 30 specialties participated in the latest Medscape Internist Ethics Report. As with all Medscape surveys, there are interesting results. I want to flag just one. Over 83% of physicians agree that terminally... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs