“ We Are Not Here to Save Bioethics: ” Amplifying Diverse Voices in Bioethics
by Keisha Ray, PhD Originally presented at “Race and Bioethics: Amplifying Diverse Voices,” sponsored by Columbia University Bioethics. My co-panelists and I have been tasked with thinking about the ways that bioethics does, or in most cases, does not consider issues of race, including racism, and systemic health inequities. Although I am very happy to have this opportunity to speak about bioethics because it is something very dear to me, and I couldn’t see myself doing anything else, this opportunity feels like another moment where a bioethicist of color has to defend her work, her place in bioethi...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 20, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Diversity Ethics Featured Posts Professionalism Race Uncategorized racism Source Type: blogs

Dying of Inequality and Republicanness: Questioning Metzl on Whiteness
by G.M. Trujillo, Jr., Ph.D. Critics and academics laud Jonathan Metzl’s Dying of Whiteness. But unlike many academic works, it caught public attention. Metzl toured the country to give talks, and white supremacists even tried to shut down one of his events. The book deserves the praise. It enables readers to grasp that no one is immune from the ills of racism, even white people. The book’s thesis is simple: “a host of complex anxieties prompt increasing numbers of white Americans … to support right-wing politicians and policies, even when these policies actually harm white Americans at growing ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 15, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Cultural Featured Posts Health Policy & Insurance Race death and dying whiteness Source Type: blogs

AJOB Journal Student Cover Art
Original art and artist’s blurbs are presented in collaboration with the students of the University of Illinois Chicago program in Biomedical Visualization.  by Sydney Agger, BA While Artificial Intelligence (AI) has shown promise as a diagnostic tool for individuals with depression, I wanted to create an illustration that evoked the feeling behind the ethical challenges described by Laacke et al. in his article about AI, social media, and depression. Throughout the process of creating this illustration my main goal was to maintain a sense of uneasiness between the figure being observed and their shadowy o...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 30, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Art Featured Posts Journal Cover Art Source Type: blogs

College Vaccination Mandates do not Violate Medical Ethics
by Nathan Nobis PhD In a June 14, 2021 opinion essay in the Wall Street Journal, physician-ethicist Aaron Kheriaty and law professor Gerard V. Bradley argue that “University Vaccine Mandates Violate Medical Ethics” (archived version). Their core claim is that requiring college students to be vaccinated for COVID treats these students as “mere means,” using them like “guinea pigs” for the potential benefit of others, and that’s unethical. As a medical ethicist, I want to explain why college vaccination requirements decidedly do not violate the core principles of medical ethics...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 30, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: COVID-19 pandemic Ethics Featured Posts Vaccines Covid-19 vaccine Source Type: blogs

Environmental Toxins Are a Threat to Informed Consent and Justice. How is Bioethics Going to Respond?
by Keisha Ray PhD and Jane Cooper MBE One of the inequities to come out of the Covid-19 pandemic is an increase in the disproportionate effects of environmental toxins on poor people and/or people of color. Additionally, during the pandemic Black, Latinx, and Indigenous people disproportionately experienced higher rates of Covid-19 infections, hospitalizations, and deaths from the virus. New research, however, has revealed a link between air pollution and likelihood of death from Covid-19; people who live in highly polluted areas are more likely to die once they have the Covid-19 virus.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 28, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: COVID-19 pandemic Environmental Ethics Featured Posts Informed Consent Justice Source Type: blogs

AIDD, Autonomy, and Military Ethics
by Sally J. Scholz, PhD This editorial can be found in the latest issue of American Journal of Bioethics. In “Artificial Intelligence, Social Media and Depression,” Laacke and colleagues (2021) consider the ethical implications of artificial intelligence depression detector (AIDD) tools to assist practitioners in diagnosing depression or posttraumatic stress. Although the revised account of health-related autonomy (HRDA) offers important correctives in the era of digital data, I argue that additional considerations ought to operate in institutional contexts where autonomy is already compromised, such as i...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 23, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Artificial Intelligence Editorial-AJOB Ethics Featured Posts Military autonomy military ethics Source Type: blogs

Stem Cell Bioethics vs. Disability Rights
by A. Rahman Ford, JD, PhD There can be no question that current FDA regulations regarding the use of one’s own stem cells (autologous therapies) to treat or potentially cure disabling conditions are very restrictive. Under most circumstances stem cells extracted from one person, processed, and then administered to the same person are legally considered “drugs” and must be subjected to the rather long and expensive clinical trial process. Nevertheless, and despite the persistent threat of FDA warning letters and lawsuits, an increasing number of clinics offer autologous stem cell therapy (SCT).…...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 18, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Disability Featured Posts Justice Science Stem Cells Vulnerable Populations Source Type: blogs

Multiracial Healthcare: What about us?
By Daphne O. Martschenko, PhD and Jennifer L. Young, PhD  June 12 was Loving Day – a celebration of the 1967 landmark court case that finally allowed interracial couples to marry. As multiracial people of color and as scholars, we reflect on our diversity – not  just in our features – but in our experiences as Americans, particularly in healthcare. Reassuring Results?: Dr. Martschenko’s Reflection In 2019, on a cold snowy night in Chicago I got a call from my primary care physician. She… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 17, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Cultural Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Race Social Justice Biracial implicit bias Multiracial Representation Source Type: blogs

COVID-19 Proved That Americans With Disabilities Need Biden ’s Infrastructure Plan. Lawmakers Must Not Negotiate it Away.
By Clayton Jones, LCDR, CHC, USN, Kevin Mintz, PhD, Andrew Peterson, PhD America is winning the battle against COVID-19. As of mid-June, over 50% of Americans have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine, and pandemic-related deaths are on the decline. But with this breath of optimism comes time to reflect on the Americans we failed, and time to focus on improving our infrastructure to prevent future disasters.    For Americans with disabilities, President Biden’s infrastructure proposal, with its focus on care services, is a necessary step in this direction.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: COVID-19 pandemic Disability Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics Public Health Social Justice Biden administration community-based Lawmakers Public-Health Infrastructure Source Type: blogs

In Memoriam – Bob Orr, Clinical Ethics Pioneer
by Robert Macauley MD Next to “Clinical Ethicist” in the dictionary, there really ought to be a photo of Bob Orr. Not only was he at the forefront of what was then a nascent field, his writing, teaching, and mentoring influenced and molded the next generation of clinical ethicists. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship at the Maclean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago in 1990—back when that was one of the few such training programs in existence—he went on to start the clinical ethics program at Loma Linda University Medical Center, before returning to his adop...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 11, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Featured Posts In Memoriam Source Type: blogs

Barcode Me
by Anne Zimmerman, JD, MS I use the phrase “Barcode me” to verbalize the idea that my data is my own and that when anyone stands to use it for financial gain, I should be paid. The big data landscape with its massive capabilities can trace data at many points in the aggregation process. Pieces of metadata are merged into larger aggregate pools and deidentified along the way. Whether I am barcoded or represented by a QR code or even a shape or algorithm, there are ways to compensate me.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 3, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Anne Zimmerman Tags: Artificial Intelligence Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Source Type: blogs

Preparing For The Next Generation of Ethical Challenges Concerning Heritable Human Genome Editing
by Robert Klitzman, MD This editorial can be found in the latest issue of American Journal of Bioethics. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15265161.2021.1913894 On September 5, 2020, the International Commission on the Clinical Use of Human Germline Genome Editing, established by the U.S. National Academy of Medicine (NAM), the National Academy of Science, and the British Royal Society, with members from 10 countries, issued its Report, recommending caution in future uses of heritable human genome editing (HHGE) (National Academy of Medicine, the National Academies of Sciences and the Royal Society&nb...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Robert Klitzman Tags: Editorial-AJOB Ethics Featured Posts Genetics Source Type: blogs

Juvenile Justice: Why It Is Ethical to Vaccinate Our Children Now
by Kyle Ferguson, Ph.D., and Arthur Caplan, Ph.D. On May 10, 2021, the F.D.A. authorized the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine for use in 12- to 15-year-olds. The C.D.C.’s A.C.I.P. convened on May 12th to review clinical trial data and unanimously voted to recommend using the vaccine in this cohort. As a result, young teens started getting their shots and the protection we owe them. By getting vaccinated, these youths will help our nation achieve valuable collective goals. We think this is welcome news.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 25, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Arthur Caplan Tags: COVID-19 pandemic Ethics Featured Posts Global Ethics Pediatrics Vaccines Covid-19 vaccine Source Type: blogs

Interrupting the Medical Ableism Feedback Loop
by Joseph Stramondo, PhD The COVID-19 pandemic reveals systemic health inequities in ways that are hard to ignore.  These inequities tracked race, class, and several other overlapping and interlocking oppressions, including ableism. Ableism roughly refers to an ideology that disrespects and unjustly disadvantages disabled people on account of their disability.  Ableism can appear in the attitudes and beliefs of individual people or it can be “baked in” to a system of institutions and practices.   Systemic ableism was most apparent early on in the pandemic, in the ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 19, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Disability Featured Posts Health Disparities Justice ableism Disability, Chronic Conditions and Rehabilitation social determinants of health Social Justice Source Type: blogs

Overturning National Eviction Bans is Institutionalized Racism and Sexism
 by Keisha Ray, PhD One of the social determinants of health is housing. Although in my work I discuss all of the social determinants of health, I tend to focus on the importance of housing because where we live, our zip code, with whom we live, the country, state, and city we live in can tell us a lot about people’s access to healthy food, recreation areas, clean water and air, and public transportation. Where a person lives can also tell us about their proximity to crime, environmental toxins (e.g. landfills, etc), which ar...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Featured Posts Gender Disparities Health Disparities Politics Public Health Race Source Type: blogs

Why it is Important to Call Out Racist Language Amongst Our Professional Peers
by Mildred Cho, PhD Recently, on a panel at a conference of a medical professional society, the president of the society used a racist term that is an ethnic slur used to refer to Asians. The speaker did not publicly apologize but did resign from official duties of the society. Other leaders of the society issued a series of underwhelming apologies, the final one asking for “tolerance”. This request puzzled me. Did it mean there should not be harsh consequences for using a racist term in a professional setting?… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 5, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Professionalism Race Source Type: blogs

Vaccine Passports: Alleviate Stranger Danger!
by Brian M Cummings M.D.  and John J. Paris S.J.        Vaccine passports are likely to become a necessary part of our lives until we achieve herd immunity and no longer need worry about contracting a potentially life-threatening virus from strangers. Such ‘passports’ might not be the first item on our wish list.  But the arguments for their use are basic and compelling. As Gostin and colleagues’ recent article notes, vaccine passports encourage people to be vaccinated and allow a reopening of the economy.  … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 3, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: John Paris Tags: COVID-19 pandemic Featured Posts Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Vaccines Vaccine Passport Source Type: blogs

On The Wrong Track: The Societal Risks of Ending Religious Exemptions
by Anne Zimmerman, JD, MS Vaccination hesitancy calls for a social sciences approach, not merely a public health data driven solution, nor necessarily a legal one. Nonmedical costs of eliminating religious exemptions should be considered. Ending religious exemptions risks increasing rights extremism and suffering its societal effect on all other public policies. By bringing those who are fighting to preserve the religious exemption into the discussion, a unified approach or compromise may be possible. Alienating them may cause more harm than good.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 29, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Anne Zimmerman Tags: Featured Posts Public Health Vaccines COVID-19 Covid-19 vaccine Source Type: blogs

How The Pandemic Can Help Fix Maternity Care in the United States
by Raymond DeVires, PhD and Eugene Declercq, PhD The COVID crisis is shining a light on the way we organize our lives together, exposing inequalities and inefficiencies that, until now, were hiding in plain sight.  Because of the changes forced on us by COVID-19, we have begun to question many aspects of our lives, including where we work, how we provide education, and how we deliver health care.    One prominent story is the plight of women anguishing over the question of where they should birth their b...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 28, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Birthing Featured Posts Health Care Maternity Care Source Type: blogs

Baring the Essentials
by Arthur Caplan, PhD Do Americans have any real sense of what it means to be an ‘essential’, worker who therefore should be first in line for Covid vaccinations?  The answer, based on the rocky rollout of vaccines in different states, is we don’t have a clue. There has been a good deal of handwringing and sniping about constant cheating clouding America’s vaccine rollout.  As vaccine access was expanded beyond the elderly and the health care workforce to include ‘essential workers’ stories appeared of people lying about their age, medical status, citizenship, residency, ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 26, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Arthur Caplan Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Justice COVID-19 Covid-19 vaccine Source Type: blogs

Umbilical Hernias: Systemic Racism, Dogma, And Pediatric Surgery
by Stephanie Preston, MD In the health professions, we have all been taught that some of the most common, chronic, and debilitating diseases in the United States – hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, and most cancers – disproportionately affect Black Americans. As resident surgeons, dogma holds that umbilical hernias are more prevalent in Black children, but without any discussion about underlying drivers. There is no evidence to support that this disparity is related to biologic or genetic differences. However, a recently published study continues to state that umbilical hernias are 8-9x more prevalent a...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 13, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Children/Adolescents Ethics Featured Posts Health Care Health Disparities Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

Delaying Vaccine Dosages Is More Than Risky, It ’s Unethical
by Elisheva “Eli” Nemetz, BA, MBE The field of bioethics emerged as a result of the atrocities attested to in the Nuremberg Trials and the inhumanity of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study. People were a means to an end, and perverted minds engaged in medical experimentation on vulnerable individuals. These barbaric and sadistic ‘projects’ led to critical changes like the Nuremberg Code, which stated that voluntary consent from participants is essential for research (The Nuremberg Code, 1947). Over time we have absorbed these lessons and applied them.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 9, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics Featured Posts Public Health Research Ethics Vaccines COVID-19 Covid-19 vaccine Source Type: blogs

AJOB ’s Acceptance Rate
Bela Fishbeyn, MS and David Magnus, PhD Our publishers recently changed how they present journal metrics on Taylor & Francis Online. Each journal in their portfolio now features a new metrics tab on every journals’ home page that includes information about citation metrics, usage (downloads), speed (average days from submission to first decision, average days from acceptance to online publication, etc), and acceptance rate.  The information was added in the hopes of empowering researchers and authors to make informed decisions by providing a broader range of metrics and clear information for their use....
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Bela Fishbeyn Tags: Uncategorized AJOB Journal Metrics Source Type: blogs

Patriotism, Rights, and Vaccination
Anne Zimmerman, JD, MS By suggesting a lack of education or a failure to digest vaccination science, the public health officials and media miss a crucial point. Many people who do not want to accept a vaccine speak about liberty, and in the case of mandatory vaccination or vaccination as a condition of participation, bodily intrusion coerced by government. In February, 56 percent of white Republicans surveyed were unsure or planned to refuse vaccination. Their arguments are steeped in patriotism, loyalty to a bill of rights (albeit one that imagines no limits on those rights) and being American.  ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - April 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: COVID-19 pandemic Cultural Featured Posts Justice Politics Uncategorized Vaccines Source Type: blogs

AstaZeneca ’s Vaccine Ethical Problem
Brian M. Cummings, MD and John J. Paris, SJ, PhD In The New York Times, almost overlooked amidst multiple articles on Covid-19 published that day, we found a challenging essay by Max Fisher entitled, “Europe’s Vaccine Ethics Call:  Do No Harm and Let More Die”?  Fisher inquires whether clinical bioethics should accept the decision of Germany to suspend the use of AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine due to blood clots because of what bioethicists label “The Trolley Problem”.   The ‘ Trolley Problem’ is a thought experiment designed ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 29, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies COVID-19 pandemic Decision making Featured Posts Global Ethics Pharmaceuticals Vaccines AstraZeneca Trolley Problem Source Type: blogs

Immortal Surgeon General: C. Everett Koop, 40 years on
In this age of radical political polarization, it’s good to be reminded of a man whom Reagan hired to please the social conservatives, yet whose 90th birthday party was hosted by Hillary Clinton. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 27, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Children/Adolescents Clinical Ethics Cultural Featured Posts Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law HIV/AIDS Politics Public Health C Everett Koop surgeon general Source Type: blogs

What is Medicine to do?: Righting Past And Present Abuses Against People of Color
By Keisha Ray, PhD  I have been interviewed by many journalists who are writing articles about the COVID-19 vaccines and Black people. Most of the interviews are very similar; journalists want to know how do medicine’s and public health’s past abuses of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous people affect their willingness to trust medicine and get vaccinated against COVID-19. After making it clear that it is not people of color (POC) that need to work on their trust of medicine but that it is medicine who needs to work on its ability to be trusted, I tell j...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 21, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Justice Public Health Race Social Justice Vulnerable Populations Source Type: blogs

Surveillance Capitalism + the Medical Gaze = Yikes
by Adam Omelianchuk, PhD Consider what the future holds for mental health treatment options. One could authorize an “Internet of Things” to detect mood-changes from an app that monitors one’s social media posts; stress levels from a smartwatch; anxiety symptoms from tapping and scrolling patterns on a touchscreen; signs of cognitive impairment from a speech pattern analysis through anything with a microphone; the benefits of an A.I. chatbot that offers therapeutic conversation; the presence of gut microbes associated with autism from the examination feces deposited in a smart toilet; sleep quality from...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 17, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Artificial Intelligence Featured Posts Technology medical gaze surveillance Source Type: blogs

Resurrecting the Presidential Commission For The Study of Bioethical Issues With Public Engagement at Its Core
by Naomi Scheinerman, PhD The Biden-Harris Administration has a wonderful opportunity, particularly amidst a pandemic in which bioethics questions and difficult tradeoffs are not in short supply, to resurrect a group tasked to advise the president on “bioethical issues arising from advances in biomedicine and related areas of science and technology.” Created under the Obama administration, and dispersed under Trump, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues was responsible for numerous reports on topics that included synthetic biology, pediatric research, whole genome sequencing, neu...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 9, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Ethics Featured Posts Health Policy & Insurance Health Regulation & Law Politics Source Type: blogs

Tik Tok Doc Sexual Assault Suit – What Does This Mean for the Anti-Harassment Movement?
by Alyssa Burgart Last night, my phone exploded with texts from colleagues when a former anesthesiology resident at Oregon Health Sciences University, the famous “Tik Tok Doc” was named in a $45 million sexual assault complaint. In addition to the resident Dr. Jason L. Campbell, the suit names OHSU, a prominent anti-harassment advocate, residency program directors, leadership in the departments of Anesthesiology and Emergency medicine, and others in power. The 39-page suit alleges a massive institutional failure and highlights the features in a system where harassment thrives and flourishes.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - March 2, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Alyssa Burgart Tags: Featured Posts Justice professional ethics Professionalism Social Media Misconduct Sexual Assault Sexual Harassment Source Type: blogs

AJOB Webinar: COVID-19 Vaccines and Allocation
Check out the recording of American Journal of Bioethics’ latest webinar on the ethical issues surrounding allocating COVID-19 vaccines. Journal editor David Magnus leads panelists Grace Lee, Kathy Kinlaw, Govind Persad, and Monica Peek in an informative and intriguing conversation. The original webinar was held on February 17th, 9a – 10:15a PT. But this webinar, along with our other webinars can be viewed on AJOB’s youtube channel, found here.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 22, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Clinical Ethics COVID-19 pandemic Featured Posts Public Health Uncategorized Vaccines Webinar Source Type: blogs

Psychedelic Lawyering – Access to Psilocybin
Join Kathryn Tucker for the upcoming CLE course "Psychedelic Lawyering."This course will discuss recent and ongoing advocacy efforts to remove barriers to access to psychedelic substances, including psilocybin. In recent years there has been incre... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Robert Rivas on Final Exit Network
Radio show host Jane Asher recently interviewed attorney Robert Rivas about the Final Exit Network.Since the mid 1990s, Rivas has dedicated his life to advocacy in the movement for right to death with dignity. Robert is the author of the SADD, the Supp... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 17, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying (ACAMAID) – Happy Birthday
February 15, 2021 marks the first anniversary of the American Clinicians Academy on Medical Aid in Dying (ACAMAID).The Academy is the first national organization devoted solely to the clinical aspects of medical aid in dying. For clinicians, ACAMA... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Vaccine Distribution and Racial Equity
Most Americans know that African-Americans have a significantly lower life expectancy than White Americans. Most of us don’t think through the implications of that disparity. For example, all working people pay into Social Security, but African-Americans are less likely to live long enough to collect it. In this op-ed, published today in the Allentown, PA … Continue reading Vaccine Distribution and Racial Equity (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: denasdavis Tags: Health Care syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Wrongful Life Lawsuits when Advance Directives Are Disregarded (podcast)
The Good Law | Bad Law podcast hosts attorneys Michael McKeon and Mark Kovacich to discuss wrongful prolongation of life, DNRs, self-determination, and a case in which Mr. McKeon and Mr. Kovacich represented a man whose advance directive was ignored.&n... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Need Help Getting Your Advance Directive Honored? Get a Surrogate Consultant
Are having trouble getting an Advance Directive honored, for yourself or as a surrogate for another individual? The Final Exit Network offers a "Surrogate Consultant" to review the issue thoroughly with you and go over the Advance Directive. ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 16, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Hastening Death by Voluntarily Stopping Eating & Drinking – Why Do Some Consider This Option? Why Should They? What Should They Know Before Proceeding?
Judy Schwarz at End of Life Choices New York provides a practical basic introduction to Voluntarily Stopping Eating & Drinking (VSED).Judy is a co-editor on our forthcoming book from Oxford University Press: Voluntarily Stopping Eating an... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bioethicists Respond: How Can Medical And Nursing Schools Prepare Students to Respond to The Social And Racial Inequities Created And Worsened by The COVID-19 Pandemic?
by Rachel Fabi, PhD, Vivian V. Altiery De Jesús, MBE, and Liz Stokes, JD, MA, RN In this series we ask bioethicists to respond to a question that embodies current challenges for bioethics, medicine, or health care. In this blog, three bioethicists were asked to share their thoughts on “How can medical and nursing schools prepare students to respond to the social and racial inequities created and worsened by the COVID-19 pandemic?” Here are their responses: Rachel Fabi, PhD As an educator in a medical school who teaches a course on physicians and social responsibility, I have seen a dramatic ...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Education Featured Posts Health Disparities Social Justice Vulnerable Populations #diaryofaplagueyear COVID-19 Source Type: blogs

Video Series: How To Prevent Future Pandemics
First interview in the new  Thinking Out Loud series on ‘Animals and Pandemics’: Katrien Devolder in conversation with Jeff Sebo, Associate Professor of Environmental Studies at NYU, on how our treatment of animals increases the risk of fut... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Katrien Devolder Tags: Animal Ethics Environmental Ethics Health Care Public Health Coronavirus; Pandemic; Ethics; Public Health factory farming International/ Global Health Katrien Devolder Interview Pandemic Ethics syndicated veganism Video Series Yout Source Type: blogs

Nursing Home Residents Are Harmed when Facilities Disregard Advance Directives
In three recent news stories, I described a growing trend of successful court actions against healthcare providers who disregarded advance directives and administered unwanted life-sustaining treatment (New York Times; Boston Globe; Bloomberg Law)... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - February 15, 2021 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs