Attacks On Abortion Liberty Are Also Attacks on Physician Autonomy
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. I am a man writing about abortion. I am a bioethicist outraged that a bunch of JDeities believe they know more about medicine than doctors, and more about a woman’s body than a woman living in her body. I am a citizen incensed that a bunch of legislators are trying to force their narrow view of morality on a nation that has prided itself on freedom and individual liberty. I am a scholar petrified that these moves are intended to favor one religion over all others and to subjugate women to second class citizen status.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 19, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Featured Posts Health Care Health Regulation & Law Politics Privacy Reproductive Ethics abortion Source Type: blogs

Medical Brain Death Is Not Legal Death
I recorded this brief video that explains why medical brain death is not legal brain death.  Since most organ donors are not legally dead, there is widespread noncompliance with the dead donor rule. Consequently, we have three choices: Decide t... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Academic Bioethics & Patient Voices
I was delighted to participate, yesterday, in Munson Healthcare's 4th Annual Clinical Ethics Conference.  A real highlight of the day was a compelling and beautifully delivered reflection from a mother, Melissa Fournier, about her very prema... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 18, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (May 13-17, 2019): #NewAmsterdam, #ChicagoMed
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 22): Max’s Impossible Choice
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Decision making End of Life Care Featured Posts Source Type: blogs

Death and Sex, Using Thought Experiments with Modern Technology to Address Issues like Abortion, Infectious Disease, and Alzheimer Disease
Join me for American Society for Bioethics & Humanities' (ASBH) 21st Annual Conference in Pittsburgh in October 2019. One of the keynote speakers will be Margaret P. Battin, PhD MFA from the University of Utah. Her presentation is "Death and Sex, Using Thought Experiments with Modern Technology to Address Issues like Abortion, Infectious Disease, and Alzheimer Disease." Take three perennial issues in bioethics that are related to death and sex: abortion, the control of transmissible infectious disease, and the challenges of long-term dementia, especially Alzheimer disease.  Battin will supplement th...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 17, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Forced from Home: Evicting Immigrants from Public Housing Harms Children ’s Health
The federal government's proposed rule to disqualify families from public housing if any member is undocumented will harm children, families, and cities. The post Forced from Home: Evicting Immigrants from Public Housing Harms Children’s Health appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Public Health Children and Families Hastings Bioethics Forum public housing syndicated undocumented immigrants Undocumented Patients Source Type: blogs

10th International Shared Decision Making Conference (ISDM 2019)
Are you ready for the 10th International Shared Decision Making Conference? Like other recent healthcare decision making conferences, ISDM 2019 will be in another beautiful location: Quebec City. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 16, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Shamima Begum and the Public Good
Written by Steve Clarke,Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities and Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, University of Oxford, & School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Charles Sturt University   Shamima Begum, who left the UK in 2015 at age 15, to join the Islamic State, has been the subject of consistent media attention since she […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Clarke Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care Politics Bangladesh Citizenship crime Current Affairs Hisba Islamic State regulation religion Sajid Javid Shamima Begum Steve Clarke's Posts syndicated Syria Tasnime Akunjee terrorism Source Type: blogs

Parental responsibility in childhood immunizations
Steve Phillips Last week I wrote about the issue of parental responsibility and medical decision-making for children. We have good reasons for having parents be the primary decision makers for children who are not capable of making their own medical decisions. However, as I discussed in the last post, there are some situations in which … Continue reading "Parental responsibility in childhood immunizations" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Tribute for Dax Cowart (1947-2019)
Dax Cowart, the patient in one of the most famous early cases in bioethics, has died. William Winslade offers an admirable tribute. From the opening paragraph: "Dax Cowart, patients’ rights advocate and lawyer, died of cancer on April 28, 2019. . . . He was widely known for his attempts to refuse treatment for severe burns caused by a propane gas explosion and fire . . . ." "Physicians . . . disregarded his pleas on the grounds that he was incompetent.  But Dax argued passionately that he had a right to decide whether or not to undergo the extremely painful burn treatments.  The 1974 doc...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 15, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A Tribute for Dax Cowart (1947-2019)
by William J. Winslade, PhD, JD Dax Cowart, patients’ rights advocate and lawyer, died of cancer on April 28, 2019.  He was 71. He was widely known for his attempts to refuse treatment for severe burns caused by a propane gas explosion and fire that occurred in East Texas in 1973.  Physicians in Dallas and Galveston disregarded his pleas on the grounds that he was incompetent.  But Dax argued passionately that he had a right to decide whether or not to undergo the extremely painful burn treatments. … (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: William Winslade Tags: End of Life Care Featured Posts In Memoriam Source Type: blogs

Come Hold a Real Human Brain
This is a terrific immersive exhibit where visitors get to hold real human brains. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Cross Post: Ten Ethical Flaws in the Caster Semenya Decision on Intersex in Sport
Written by Julian Savulescu, University of Oxford Caster Semenya is legally female, was from birth raised as female and identifies as a female. Jon Connell on flickr , CC BY-NC Middle-distance runner Caster Semenya will need to take hormone-lowering agents, or have surgery, if she wishes to continue her career in her chosen athletic events. The […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Ethics Health Care Cross Post Female Athletics gender and sport Julian Savulescu's Posts Sex and Gender syndicated The Conversation Source Type: blogs

Invalid Consent to DNR Order (video)
This dramatization may be eerily close to how patients often consent to DNR orders. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (May 6-10) #TheResident; #ChicagoMed
Exploring ethical issues in medical dramas The Resident (Season 2; Episode 23): Unrepresented patient and substance abuse; Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 20): Violating a patient’s autonomy; organ trafficking The Resident (Season 2; Episode 23): Unrepresented patient and substance abuse A middle-aged man comes to the ER unable to speak and without ID. The staff gives him the name “Sunflower”. He is presumed to be homeless based on the state of his clothing and dirt under his fingernails; thus, without insurance.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 14, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Decision making Featured Posts Informed Consent Organ Transplant & Donation battery EMTALA organ trafficking Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

Patient Dignity (Formerly:Patient Modesty):Volume 99
Does  the above animation tell us anything about thepatient-doctor relationships which has been amply describedand detailed on this blog thread?  Could any of the patientreactions to the actions of the physician or the medical systemsimply be... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Maurice Bernstein, M.D. Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Informed Consent: A Matter of Aspiration Since 1966 (At Least)
This blog post made available by the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read this editorial and accompanying articles here. by Sarah Wieten, Ph.D., Jacob Blythe, MA, & David Magnus, Ph.D. In their target article, Beskow and Weinfurt investigate a lack of understanding by research participants about central concepts in biobanking and disagreement among experts about what this lack of understanding means for informed consent. Beskow and Weinfurt designed and carried out “a national online survey in which participants were randomized to receive either the simplified or traditional consent form … After rea...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: David Magnus Tags: Clinical Trials & Studies Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Informed Consent Source Type: blogs

Why I Support Medicaid Expansion
This blog post made available by the American Journal of Bioethics. You can read this editorial and accompanying articles here. by Laura Kelly, MS, Governor of Kansas A single mother doing her best to raise her children. A small business owner realizing her dreams in a rural Kansas town. A caregiver for a disabled child. All these Kansans deserve the ability to see a doctor when they need one and receive the health care services necessary for them to remain productive members of their communities.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Health Disparities Health Policy & Insurance Politics Social Justice Medicaid expansion Source Type: blogs

Caster Semenya, What ’s Next?
Guest Post: Torbjörn Tännsjö, Kristian Claëson Emeritus Professor of Practical Philosophy Statistically speaking, women perform less well than men in most sports. Their top results are 10-12 % worse than those of men. If they are to have a chance to compete at the top level, they need a protected space. At least, this has been […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Practical Ethics Tags: Genetics Health Care Guest Post sports syndicated Source Type: blogs

Father ‘Buried Alive’ After Stroke Triggers Rare Locked-In Syndrome
In 2017, Darren Leith had a stroke that left him in a locked-in state. This recent story on Leith reminded me that many patients seek to hasten their death not because of their (non-fixable) medical condition but because of their (potentially fixable) social condition. While Leith has not sought to end his life, his depression comes not so much from the locked-in condition as much as from the fact that he is 100 miles away from his family in a neuro-rehabilitation center.  The last time Leith’s daughter visited him, he spelled out five words by using his eyes to point to letters on a board - "take me home y...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 13, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Texas Advance Directives Act – Constitutionality of " 10-Day Rule " Heads to Supreme Court
Litigants challenging the constitutionality of the dispute resolution provisions in the Texas Advance Directives Act (sometimes called "the 10-day rule") lost before two lower courts in Houston. They are now taking their case to the Supreme Court of Te... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 12, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Religion, Suffering, and the Physician ’s Role
Should religion play a role in a doctor's care of seriously ill patients? The author, a hematologist/oncologist who teaches Jewish medical ethics, writes: "A physician's outlook may be shaped by religious standards without having to impose it on the patient." The post Religion, Suffering, and the Physician’s Role appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Chronic Conditions and End of Life Care Hastings Bioethics Forum Health and Health Care Medicine & Religion syndicated Source Type: blogs

Simon ’ s Law – DNR Transparency in Arizona Too
More states are considering Simon's Laws. These require clinicians to notify parents before instituting a DNR order for a minor patient. These laws also typically prohibit clinicians from instituting a DNR order over parental objections. However, the ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 11, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Informed Consent Requires Understanding: Complete Disclosure Is Not Enough
My latest open peer commentary is in the May 2019 American Journal of Bioethics: "Informed Consent Requires Understanding: Complete Disclosure Is Not Enough." I tackle one of the most important yet under-examined issues in bioethics: the relationship ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 10, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Wrongful Prolongation of Life – A Cause of Action that May Have Finally Moved into the Mainstream
Sam Hodge has just published "Wrongful Prolongation of Life - A Cause of Action that May Have Finally Moved into the Mainstream" in the Quinnipiac Law Review. Hodge argues: "Historically, physicians were able to act with impunity concerning end-of-lif... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Bigotry in Medicine: Legal, Yes. Ethical, No.
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Medical School Interviewer: “If you could, please tell me why you decided to apply to medical school and pursue a career in medicine?” Applicant: “So that I could refuse to treat the godless heathens.” Interviewer: “Under U.S. rules, that is your right. Welcome to Med School.” Under a new rule, the Trump Administration has strengthened a religious liberty clause that protects health care workers who refuse to perform procedures or treat patientsthat violate their religious beliefs.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 9, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: Education Ethics Featured Posts Health Regulation & Law Justice Politics professional ethics Source Type: blogs

Parental responsibility in medical decisions for children
By Steve Phillips The 2 posts on this blog this week by Neil Skjoldal and Mark McQuain raise issues related to parental decision-making for the medical treatment of their children. Neil raised this issue related to parental refusal of life-saving treatment for acute leukemia and Mark raised it related to parental decisions not to have … Continue reading "Parental responsibility in medical decisions for children" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Steve Phillips Tags: Health Care bioethics Health Care Practice Medical Decision Making syndicated Source Type: blogs

Texas Advance Directives Act – David & Carolyn Jones
Texas Right to Life is fighting to amend the dispute resolution provisions in the Texas Advance Directive Act. To put a fresh face on their argument, TRTL is publicizing the case of David and Carolyn Jones. Apparently, Memorial Hermann Southwest Hospi... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 8, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

A New Role for Religion in Bioethics?
by Nathan Carlin, Ph.D. When I began reading in the history of bioethics, I was struck by the fact that many of the founders of bioethics had theological degrees, which led to a common way of articulating the origins of the field: “Bioethics began in theology, but quickly secularized.” There are debates about how this happened. Yet in recent years a renewed interest in religion and bioethics has emerged. The University of Chicago’s Program on Religion and Medicine is one such example.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Nathan Carlin Tags: Clinical Ethics Decision making Featured Posts Health Care Medical Humanities health humanities Theology Source Type: blogs

We Should Be Concerned About Athletes Having to ‘Dope Down’
Last week, the Court of Arbitration for Sport rejected an appeal by South African runner Caster Semenya that challenged the International Association of Athletic Federation’s proposed regulations that women like her with atypically high levels of testosterone must take medication to reduce testosterone levels in order to compete in certain events. The post We Should Be Concerned About Athletes Having to ‘Dope Down’ appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Marnie Klein Tags: Health Care athletics Caster Semenya syndicated Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Vincent Lambert – Too Much Due Process
In The Ages of American Law (1977), Grant Gilmore, observed: "The worse the society, the more law there will be. In Hell there will be nothing but law and due process will be meticulously observed." There is perhaps no better illustration of TOO MUCH ... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Arbitrariness as an Ethical Criticism
Written by Ben Davies We recently saw a legal challenge to the current UK law that compels fertility clinics to destroy frozen eggs after a decade. According to campaigners, the ten-year limit may have had a rationale when it was instituted, but advances in freezing technology have rendered the limit “arbitrary”. Appeals to arbitrariness often […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ben Davies Tags: Decision making Ethics Health Care arbitrariness bias Current Affairs ethical principles medical ethics reasons regulation syndicated Source Type: blogs

Measles: When does Screening, Quarantining and/or Vaccination become Mandatory?
By Mark McQuain As this linked PBS NewsHour interview between Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and Judy Woodruff reports, the number of new cases of measles in the US has reached nearly 700, which is the highest number of new cases since measles was supposedly eliminated in … Continue reading "Measles: When does Screening, Quarantining and/or Vaccination become Mandatory?" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Mark McQuain Tags: Health Care Allocation / Access / Public Health bioethics Health Care Practice syndicated Source Type: blogs

Parental Rights
By Neil Skjoldal What rights do parents have when it comes to the medical care of their children? This bioethical question has recently arisen in the case of Noah McAdams, a 3-year-old who has been diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.  According to news reports, the recommended treatment in his case is chemotherapy.  His parents decided … Continue reading "Parental Rights" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Neil Skjoldal Tags: Health Care bioethics syndicated Source Type: blogs

Inside the Margins An interview with Marianne R. Petit
[read more] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Lucy Bruell Tags: Health Care Literature Arts and Medicine Blog syndicated The Artist Speaks Source Type: blogs

The Term ‘ Do Not Resuscitate ’ Should Be Laid to Rest
Amber Barnato calls for stopping use of the term "DNR." She rightly observes that it is often misinterpreted and misapplied. The consequence is that not only do patients get treatment they do not want but they also fail to get treatments that they do w... (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 6, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Brain Death Bioethics:Fundamental Principles and Emerging Issues
I had a great time attending the Eighth Annual Great Lakes Palliative Care Conference in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin yesterday. I presented "Brain Death Bioethics:Fundamental Principles and Emerging Issues." (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and the World Medical Association
The World Medical Association (WMA) is cogitating on physician-assisted suicide. Their current statement, adopted in 1992, “editorially revised” in 2005, and reaffirmed in 2015, is as follows: Physician-assisted suicide, like euthanasia, is unethical and must be condemned by the medical profession. Where the assistance of the physician is intentionally and deliberately directed at enabling an … Continue reading "Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and the World Medical Association" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 4, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care bioethics Canadian Medical Association euthanasia physician assisted suicide Royal Dutch Medical Association syndicated World Medical Association Source Type: blogs

Caster Semenya and the Challenges of Sports Brackets
If virtuous perfection of natural talents is what sports is all about, sports needs more people like Caster Semenya, the South African runner. But she is now ineligible for competing in middle distance events unless she takes medication to suppress her naturally high testosterone levels. Is this fair? The post Caster Semenya and the Challenges of Sports Brackets appeared first on The Hastings Center. (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Susan Gilbert Tags: Health Care Caster Semenya Hastings Bioethics Forum Humans and Nature syndicated testosterone Source Type: blogs

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – May 2, 2019
Politics Guatemalan Teen Falls Ill, Dies After Transfer to U.S. Border Shelter “The boy was the third migrant child to die in federal custody in the past five months, as a soaring number of Central American families and unaccompanied minors have been trying to enter the United States via the southern border. Advocates for immigrants […] (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Ethics and Society Tags: Health Care Informed Consent AI big data Brain Death catholicism Contemporary Ethical Issues Donald Trump facebook immigration In the News measles Newsfeed Sex Abuse Sri Lanka syndicated William Barr Women of Color Source Type: blogs

BioethicsTV (April 21-May 2, 2019): #NewAmsterdam, #TheResident, #GreysAnatomy
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D. Exploring bioethical issues in television medical dramas New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 19): Privatizing the VA; The Resident (Season 2; Episode 22): Organ buying; Grey’s Anatomy(Season 15; Episode 23): Insurance Fraud New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 19): Privatizing the VA A veteran has a stroke while driving and injures a police officer. We learn that the driver was diagnosed two years earlier with bladder cancer, which has led to his current stroke. He could not get treatment because the VA closed the urology division in a rush toward privatization.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - May 3, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Craig Klugman Tags: BioethicsTV Featured Posts Organ Transplant & Donation Politics Source Type: blogs