Rejuvenation of Immune Function is One of the More Important Outcomes to Engineer through the Treatment of Aging
One would hope that it does not require an ongoing pandemic and related hysteria to point out that old people have poorly functioning immune systems, and thus suffer disproportionately the burden of infectious disease. But perhaps it does. The 2017-2018 seasonal influenza, a modestly more severe occurrence of something that happens every year, killed something like 60,000 people in the US alone, with little notice or comment. There is nothing so terrible that it won't be accepted - ignored, even - if it is normal. Floodgates of funding for infectious disease research and development have been opened in response to C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Living Inside While the Coronavirus Is Outside
The outbreak of coronavirus has rocked our world and caused all of us to isolate in ways we never dreamed of doing before. For some of us who have a severe mental health illness diagnosis, this isolation is more than we might have ever experienced with our most extreme symptoms. While I have to fight my tendency to self-isolate as a result of my schizoaffective diagnosis, recent days have caused me to think about my routine and how it can, not only keep me safe from the virus, but enable me to have a productive life. While I value my routine, I have had to search for more ways to keep myself actively involved in life. Bef...
Source: World of Psychology - March 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jason Jepson Tags: Antipsychotic Personal Schizophrenia coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Psychosis quarantine Schizoaffective Disorder Source Type: blogs

Dreams Aren ’t Just Visual: We Often Hear Voices And Other Sounds Too
By Emma Young “At least since the philosophers of ancient Greece, scholars have pointed out the analogy between madness (psychosis) and dreaming…” So begins a new paper, published in PLoS One, that seems to shore up that analogy. Dreams and psychotic hallucinations do have things in common. They both feature perceptual sensations that seem real, but which are conjured up by our brains. However, there are also differences. While dreams are known to be highly visual, psychotic hallucinations are primarily auditory. They generally involve hearing things that aren’t real rather than seeing things ...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - March 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Perception Psychosis Sleep and dreaming Source Type: blogs

History of Pressure Injury Treatment at the New York Academy of Medicine
I was recently honored to present at the New York Academy of Medicine’s 11th Annual History of Medicine Night, along with five other distinguished lecturers.  My topic was entitled Bed-Sore Treatment by Suspension: A Case Report from WWII. While perusing old journals for historical tidbits on pressure injury treatment I came across the 1946 article in British Medical Journal upon which this presentation was based.  My paper recounts the story of a British physician named Captain James Fulton Neil who endured several bloody battles including Anzio and Normandy to participate in the post-war occupation of Ger...
Source: Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - March 14, 2020 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Jeffrey Levine Tags: Featured Medical Articles Medical History Pressure Injuries & Wound Care bedsores decubiti geriatrics gerontology Healthcare Quality Improving Medical Care Jeff Levine MD Jeffrey M Levine MD pressure sore pressure sores pressure Source Type: blogs

The Psychology of Misogyny & Misogynistic People
Most of us are familiar with the term “misogyny.” Today, we regularly hear it in conversation. And we regularly see it all over social media. And yet, misogyny, or misogynist, is largely misunderstood. The dictionary defines misogyny as a hatred, dislike, or mistrust of women, said Jill A. Stoddard, PhD, a psychologist and director of The Center for Stress and Anxiety Management in San Diego. The word, she noted, has Greek origins: “misein,” meaning “to hate,” and gynē, meaning “woman.” However, misogyny goes beyond despising all or even most women. Rather, “misogyny i...
Source: World of Psychology - March 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Men's Issues Psychology Women's Issues misogyny sexism Source Type: blogs

The sociology of homicide
It is certainly true that at present, the rate of violent offending is considerably higher among African-Americans in the U.S. than it is among white non-Hispanics. The rate among Latinos is somewhat higher but not nearly as much.(However, the disparity is not as great as your teevee would have you believe.   Also here.)This observation, however, is specific to time and place. As Darnell Hawkins wrote in Health Affairs some year back (Winter, 1993):In the United States the social scientific efforts to provide " causes " forantisocial conduct, including violence, were first found in studies of whiteethni...
Source: Stayin' Alive - March 5, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

What is a pandemic?
When a new disease comes to light, AIDS, SARS, and most recently COVID-19, the health experts and the media bandy about words like epidemic and pandemic. Today, COVID-19 has been described as on the verge of becoming a global pandemic. The word pandemic with relation to disease means affecting all the people. pan meaning all, demos meaning people or district, Greek pandemos. So medically, speaking we see it as either potentially affecting everyone or more usually affecting every possible region of the world, in the sense of a global pandemic. An epidemic has a similar meaning, the epi means among, and the demos might refer...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - February 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

L. reuteri yogurt: Greek-style
The post L. reuteri yogurt: Greek-style appeared first on Dr. William Davis. (Source: Wheat Belly Blog)
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - February 5, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Recipes bowel flora probiotic reuteri wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Overcoming Atelophobia, the Fear of Being Imperfect
You're reading Overcoming Atelophobia, the Fear of Being Imperfect, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. What is your biggest irrational fear? For many, it’s the fear of snakes, spiders, heights, or closed spaces. But for others, their greatest fear is not being perfect. If you are constantly stressed by the pursuit of perfection or find your perfectionism to be paralyzing, you may have atelophobia. Learn how this extreme form of perfectionism can diminish your life and health, and what you c...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lesley J. Vos Tags: featured health and fitness psychology antelophobia mental health self improvement Source Type: blogs

Cosmology
For most of our maybe 250,000 years as a species, people were aware only of their local environment. Eventually, as trade networks grew, they started to gain a dim awareness of distant lands, and by the time of classical Greece they knew that the earth is roughly spherical, although they were largely unaware of what lay beyond the Middle East and the steppes of Asia. (Alexander of course expanded their knowledge and drew the central Asian empires into the orbit of Greece.)But it was not until Galileo's time, in the late Middle Ages, that some people began to believe that the earth was not at the center of the universe. Nev...
Source: Stayin' Alive - January 27, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

A skein for a friend – a truly wild goose chase
In Stephen Rutt’s second book, Wintering, we follow him on a journey around the British Isles to find the elusive species and sub-species of what might at first light seem a rather dull and innocuous class of birds, the geese. The geese, you say? As in “what’s sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander”? What could be more interesting? Well, hang fire, Rutt’s tale takes back through mediaeval droves to the ancient Greeks and the ancient Egyptians even, by way of the marshlands and reedy wetlands of Suffolk, Northumberland, and the wide rivers of the Scottish borderlands. It also takes us bac...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - January 25, 2020 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Transforming Trauma Into Wholeness and Healing
 Trauma eventually comes for all of us.  It isn’t just stereotypical things like war or assault that are traumatic, there is also the everyday realities of things like illness or job loss. As painful as it is, trauma can be an invitation to a process of growth and change. Join us as today’s guest, Dr. James Gordon, explains some of the techniques of trauma healing, including some surprising ones, like laughter and spending time with animals. Dr. Gordon also shares with us how he personally handles his own trauma and the programs most often used by the Center for Mind-Body Medicine. SUBSCRIBE & REVI...
Source: World of Psychology - January 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Interview Mental Health and Wellness The Psych Central Show Trauma Source Type: blogs

Diabetes as the Trojan Horse of Digital Health
Originally, a Trojan horse referred to the wooden horse used to cunningly penetrate and conquer the city of Troy by the Greeks. In our era, the term has been adapted to describe disguised malwares that attack unsuspecting users’ computers and wreak havoc once inside. Judging by the title of this article, how then can a condition as serious as diabetes help move the digital health agenda forward? Computer generated 3D illustration with the Trojan Horse at Troy, source: http://codingtidbit.com/ Once upon a time, empowered patients started a revolution…  It all begins with a crippling speed of bure...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 7, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: E-Patients Future of Medicine Healthcare Design diabetes digital health diabetes management patient design Source Type: blogs

Exploring Use of Hippotherapy as a Treatment Tool
Hippotherapy (hippo is Greek for horse) continues to gain recognition in our profession, but several misconceptions exist about this approach used by speech-language pathologists and other clinicians. Hippotherapy is a treatment tool—it is not a type of treatment. Compare it to using a swing or ball or other similar tool in sessions. Also used by occupational therapists and physical therapists, the tool involves placing clients on horses while providing intervention. The approach aims to engage sensory, neuromotor, and cognitive systems to enhance outcomes, according to the American Hippotherapy Association (AHA). A ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - December 11, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Ruth Dismuke-Blakely Tags: Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Feeding Disorders Language Disorders Speech Disorders Swallowing Disorders Voice Disorders Source Type: blogs

Tik Tok, TikTok, what you waitin ’ , what you waitin ’ for?
My friend Dr Lucy Rogers tweeted something she’d posted on Tik Tok, a short clip of an English oak in its autumnal finery. Very nice I thought… …more fool me. Ten minutes later I had re-registered on Tik Tok and was scrolling through  vids like a man possessed. If Youtube was the previous tech generation’s cocaine, then Tik Tok is basically crack. If it’s not crack cocaine to Youtube’s cocaine, then it’s definitely its crystal to Vimeo’s meth, or perhaps it’s just “tirami” to Vine’s “su”. Needless to say I have now posted a few snip...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - November 27, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Top Diabetes Companies On The Way To The Artificial Pancreas
Connected continuous glucose sensing technologies, sensors inserted under the skin, digital skin patches, and many more innovations appeared on the market in the last years to make diabetes management as easy as possible. Here, we collected the flagship companies on the way to ultimately building the artificial pancreas or offering solutions to turn diabetes into an invisible condition. From honey urine to DIY artificial pancreas Diabetes has been around for centuries, if not even for thousands of years. In ancient China, India, or Greece, doctors already described the condition. In India, people discovered that the...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine blood blood sugar CGM connected health diabetes diabetes management digital digital health glucose insulin monitoring technology Source Type: blogs

A Slumbering European Crisis Awakens: Catalonia
Ted Galen CarpenterA troubling development that has largely fallen through the cracks while media and public attention is focused on Syria ’s turmoil, is the revival of serious political tensions in Spain’s Catalonia region.Pro-independence Catalans pressed their agenda in 2017, attempting to hold a referendum on secession from Spain.In doing so, they badlyoverreached.The national government in Madrid barred the referendum, and Spanish security forces sent to prevent the ballotingbrutallyattacked mostly peaceful demonstrators in Catalonia ’s largest city, Barcelona.Spanish authorities then arrested the re...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 17, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

Columbus Schmumbus
If there is one holiday that definitely needs to be repurposed, it's today's annual celebration ofa murderous idiot. (Visit link for a five minute Adam Ruins Everything.)The idea of the celebration was initially promoted by Italian Americans who craved recognition in a country that had been dominated by people from northwest Europe. Italians didn't originally have full " white " status. The idea seems to have been that drawing attention to the idea that an Italian had opened the way for European settlement of the Americas would validate their presence here, or something like that.Of course this required that he b...
Source: Stayin' Alive - October 14, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

How To Play Tricks On Artificial Intelligence?
While in the last years, sci-fi stories, experts and even some opinion-leader public figures frequently spelled the end of mankind through artificial intelligence, lately, it turned out just how easy it is to play tricks on smart algorithms and fool them into making errors. We looked around how researchers can hack A.I. and what that means for medicine and healthcare, mainly from a security perspective. Does A.I. have an Achilles heel? As the saying goes, a chain is as strong as its weakest link – and the ancient Greeks knew it. No matter that Achilles had extraordinary strength, courage, and loyalty, that he f...
Source: The Medical Futurist - October 10, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Security & Privacy adversarial adversarial example AI autonomous data security digital digital health hack Healthcare self-driving technology Source Type: blogs

The Rise and Rise of Quantitative Cassandras
By SAURABH JHA, MD Despite an area under the ROC curve of 1, Cassandra’s prophesies were never believed. She neither hedged nor relied on retrospective data – her predictions, such as the Trojan war, were prospectively validated. In medicine, a new type of Cassandra has emerged –  one who speaks in probabilistic tongue, forked unevenly between the probability of being right and the possibility of being wrong. One who, by conceding that she may be categorically wrong, is technically never wrong. We call these new Minervas “predictions.” The Owl of Minerva flies above its denominator. ...
Source: The Health Care Blog - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Artificial Intelligence Data Medical Practice Physicians RogueRad @roguerad acute kidney injury AI deep learning machine learning predictions Saurabh Jha Source Type: blogs

Living Better through Lifelong Learning
Max is an old friend of mine (both a very long time friend and old). At 92, he has been retired almost longer than he worked as a professor. But being retired hasn’t stopped him from reading, writing, taking classes (he just started a course on Greek Mythology), and exploring brain exercises and activities on the internet. Max continues to be actively engaged in his field and an enthusiastic mentor to students and professionals who seek him out.   Why doesn’t he just relax and putter around in his garden or cruise YouTube? Because, as Max says, “If you don’t use it, you’ll lose it!&r...
Source: World of Psychology - October 6, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Inspiration & Hope Motivation and Inspiration Personal Self-Help Aging Learning Memory seniors Source Type: blogs

Today ’ s wonderful marvel of the day
I only started mothing with a scientific trap a little over a year ago (24 Jul 2018, to be precise) but have logged and photographed well over 300 different species since then. I heard about Griposia aprilina, aka the Merveille du Jour, a few weeks after I started and thought it would be a nice specimen to see. But, its larvae feed on oaks and as far as I know, there are none particularly close to our garden. I was ever hopeful of seeing this little marvel but I didn’t hold out much hope of it ever making an appearance. This beautifully marked green (and black and white) moth usually emerges in adult form in early O...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Life on Athens and Kythira
A trip to the Greek capital Athens and the island of Kythira yielded some good times, lovely views, lots of laughs with new(ish) friends, and sightings of quite a few species of bird, invertebrates and plantlife we’d not all “ticked” before. Here are a few snaps of the various species: Scarce Swallowtail Marginated Tortoise Dark Bush Cricket, Pholidoptera griseoaptera Striped Shieldbug, Graphosoma lineatum Egyptian Grasshopper, Anacridium aegyptium with its striped eyes on mullein Lesser Kestrel, Falco naumanni Grayling on Sea Squill Blue-winged-Grasshopper, Oedipoda caerulescens European Skipper, Thymeli...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

The Greek Island of Kythera
Six days of yoga, walking, swimming, sightseeing, wildlife (mostly birds and invertebrates), Greek food, and beer on the island of Kythera; what could be better? Kythira, Cythera, Kythera, and Kithira. In Greek: Κύθηρα (Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science)
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

The Greek Island of Kythira
Six days of yoga, walking, swimming, sightseeing, wildlife (mostly birds and invertebrates), Greek food, and beer on the island of Kythira; what could be better? Kythira, Cythera, Kythera, and Kithira. In Greek: Κύθηρα (Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science)
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 3, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Mount Lycabettus
You can’t miss the tallest peak in Athens, no not the one with The Parthenon at the top (68 metres elevation), but Mount Lycabettus, also known as Lycabettos, Lykabettos or Lykavittos. In Greek, it’s pronounced “likavi’tos”, so the first three syllables flow as a triplet and the emphasis is on the final beat. It stands at 264 metres. Mount Lycabettus across Athens viewed from Acropolis Second full day on our trip to Athens, we took the funicular railway to the top to see the 19th Century St George’s Chapel and take in the views over the city. I’d have chosen to climb to the top, de...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Athenian Architecture
Myself and Mrs Sciencebase finally made it back to Greece after far too long a break from that beautiful country. The trip was to be yoga, walking, and wildlife, with plenty of wonderful food, a lot of Greek beer, and far too many photographs. I took the equivalent of eight 36-exposure reels on average each day of a ten-day trip, thank goodness for digital and 64 gigabyte SD cards. Anyway, before we hit the island of Kithira for the aforementioned R&R, we spent three nights in Athens, a place we had meant to visit properly back in the early 1990s, but a trip we missed out on because of ferry delays, force 6 gales, and ...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - October 2, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Trump Tweets And Cat Attachment: The Week ’s Best Psychology Links
Our weekly round-up of the best psychology coverage from elsewhere on the web Scientists can predict what country people are from just by looking at how colours make them feel, reports Eva Frederick at Science. Researchers found cultural differences in how people associate colours and emotions: Chinese participants showed the strongest association between red and joy, for example, while Greek participants were the only ones to relate purple to sadness. The team then used machine learning to guess where people were from based on the associations they made. We’ve written a lot about the value — and limitat...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - September 27, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Weekly links Source Type: blogs

The Gazillion Of Health Data You Can Measure
From SWOLF through EDA until heart rate, heart rate variability, respiratory rate, single-lead ECG, period tracking, sleep pattern analyzing: dozens of vital signs demonstrate that there’s no single square centimeter of the human body without quantifiable data. As an experiment, we tried to collect every trackable parameter to draw the boundaries of your “health data self”. Let us know if there’s anything left out. Why is measurement useful? To know thyself The famous ancient Greek aphorism was inscribed on a wall in the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, the oracle, which was believed to tell human...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Personalized Medicine Portable Diagnostics activity blood body brain breathing data fitness health data heart health heart rate lifestyle lung measure measurement meditation quantified self s Source Type: blogs

Breathtaking: The Future Of Respiratory Care And Pulmonology
Smoke-measuring smart shirts, breath sound analyzing algorithms, and smart inhalers pave the way of pulmonology and respiratory care into the future. As the number of patients suffering from asthma, COPD, or lung cancer due to rising air pollution and steady smoker-levels will unfortunately not decrease any time soon, we looked around what technology can do to help both patients and caregivers. The results are breathtaking. Attacks of breathlessness are too common The diseases which pulmonologists and respiratory care specialists attempt to fight are among the most common conditions in the modern world – and t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - September 25, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers AI asthma cancer cancer treatment care COPD diagnostics inhaler lung lung cancer management medical specialty pulmonology respiratory respiratory care Source Type: blogs

Pray for Health and Protection, But Realize that God is Not an Insurance Policy
Pray for Health and Protection,But Realize that God is Not an Insurance PolicyThrough many tribulations we must enter the kingdom of God.—Acts 14:22bHow many times have you heard someone say, “I’m a Christian, so I know God will protect me from illness, accident, and crime”? What does the Bible say? Jesus himself tells us to pray for our needs, such as food, for forgiveness for our sins, and for protection from Satan:So this is how you should pray: “Our Father in heaven, we pray that your name will always be kept holy. We pray that your kingdom will come—that what you want will be done h...
Source: The Virtual Salt - September 21, 2019 Category: Neurology Authors: Robert Harris Source Type: blogs

8 Ways to Navigate Change Without Stress & Anxiety
Change doesn’t have to be terrifying! Life change — and change in general — is certain to happen. According to the Greek philosopher, Heracleitus, “The only thing that is constant is change.” If this is true, and I believe it is, coping with life changes, transitions, and the stress and anxiety that comes with it should come more easily to everyone, don’t you think? Yet, many shudder at the thought of change. Some bury their heads and hope it will go away while others open their arms and welcome the opportunities. Heracleitus’ philosophy is a good starting point for those who shud...
Source: World of Psychology - September 20, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Publishers Stress YourTango anxiety change Manage Stress Source Type: blogs

Math brain teaser requiring no math — just perception and cognition
Necropoli Grotticelli, the tomb of Archimedes in Syracuse _______________ Greek mathematician, physicist, engineer, inventor, and astronomer Archimedes made many great scientific discoveries throughout his life. He explained why and how bodies float in the water, designed mirror arrays capable of focusing sun rays and setting enemy ships on fire, found the way of approximating the number of grains of sand that will fit inside the universe. Now to the brain teaser part. His tomb was decorated with his favorite discovery. Which one of the following three sculptures was honoring Archimedes, and why? A golden crown commemora...
Source: SharpBrains - September 13, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain Teasers Education & Lifelong Learning brain-teaser cognition math perception Source Type: blogs

The fraught history of the word, “teratology”
The field of teratology (also known as dysmorphology) is rapidly growing with daily innovations in prenatal medicine, genetics and preventive care that show its uniquely intersectional nature. But, the term teratology, and its derivatives teratoma and teratogen — derived from the ancient Greek root teras — do not do justice to the promising future of […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 11, 2019 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/arthur-lenahan" rel="tag" > Arthur Lenahan < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions OB/GYN Source Type: blogs

Bad viruses travel fast: Measles vaccine important for travelers
(This post has been updated with relevant recent information.) The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the UK Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outb...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs

Bad viruses travel fast: Measles vaccine important for travelers
The United States was declared free from ongoing measles transmission in 2000. But we may be at risk for joining the U.K, Greece, Albania, and the Czech Republic, four countries recently stripped of measles elimination status by the World Health Organization. Since the beginning of 2019, more than 1,234 measles cases have been reported in 31 states, with active outbreaks in upstate New York and El Paso, Texas. New York has just declared the end of its yearlong outbreak, which required a massive public health response to control. Minnesota had a major measles outbreak in 2017. In 2015, 125 cases of measles occurred in ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Ross, MD, FIDSA Tags: Health Infectious diseases Prevention Travel health Source Type: blogs

Why 1619 Matters in 2019
The New York Times Magazine recently released its “1619 Project,” an initiative marking the 400th anniversary of the first African slaves arriving in North America. The project is ambitious, aiming to “reframe the country’s history, understanding 1619 as our true founding.” A collection of pundits have framed this project as an attempt to “delegimitize” the United States. Such commentary provides an opportunity to consider the state of American race relations and the role of slavery in American history. Whether or not the foundation of the United States was legitimate is an in...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 19, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Matthew Feeney Source Type: blogs

Managing Mutually Antagonistic Allies Is Like Herding Cats
One problem (among many) the United States has experienced in leading a vast array of allies and security dependents is that periodic quarrels break out among such clients. Even when the disputes are parochial and petty, the degree of animosity generated frequently is not. Not only does Washington then face the prospect of one or more of those allies breaking ranks and undermining U.S. policy objectives, but the danger exists that a confrontation might escalate to a cold war —or even a hot one.Deteriorating relations between two of Washington ’s prominent allies in East Asia–Japan and the Republic of Kore...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 8, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

When Your Job Requires Brilliant Ideas, But Brainstorming Feels Like Pulling Teeth
It sounds terribly cliché, but sometimes coming up with ideas really does feel like pulling teeth. It feels painful and frustrating. It feels messy and hard. And it’s the last thing you want to do. But maybe your job requires you to come up with great ideas. On a regular basis. Maybe you’re a writer, speaker, designer, artist, podcast host, publicist, teacher, researcher, or entrepreneur. Either way, idea generation is a priority in your position. And, unfortunately, you feel utterly and completely uninspired. Mary Potter Kenyon, an author, certified grief counselor, and program coordinator at the Shalom...
Source: World of Psychology - August 7, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Habits Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress Success & Achievement Brainstorming Leadership Team Work Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 555 - a Special Challenge!
Dear readers,I am excited and humbled to be posting my 555th Parasite Case of the Week. I am continuously inspired by your comments, questions, and the rich discussion that occurs with each post. To mark this occasion, I'm asking you all to comment on ways that parasites relate to the number 5. I'll start you off with two that were previously suggested to me when I thought up this challenge:Pentatrichomonas hominisis a nonpathogenic intestinal flagellate named for its 5 flagella (penta from the Greek pente, meaning five + trich, pertaining to hair [flagella]). By Dr. Neil AndersonThere are 5 lobes of the human lung, and al...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 2, 2019 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 555 - Parasites and the Number Five
Wow - we received so many excellent comments on how parasites and the number 5 go together! Here are many of them - in no particular order - for your viewing pleasure:Pentatrichomonas hominis is a nonpathogenic intestinal flagellate named for its 5 flagella (penta from the Greek pente, meaning five + trich, pertaining to hair [flagella]). By Neil Anderson and Bernardino Rocha.There are 5 lobes of the lung, and all can be infected by Paragonimusspecies. By Brian Duresko.The are 5Plasmodiumspecies that are responsible for the bulk of malaria in humans:P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, P. malariae, andP. knowlesi(t...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 1, 2019 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Ways the Long-Lived Live Longer
We read about them with astonishment and awe. In 2017 and 2018 there were many news reports of people who lived well past 100. Emma Morano died in April 2017 at age 117, 137 days. Violet Brown died in September 2017 at 117 years, 189 days. And Yisrael Kristal who died that same month at 113 years, 330 days almost made it to 114! Chiyo Miyako died in July 2018 cage 117, 81 days. How did they do it? Surely they had something in common. Turns out they did.  Ways the long-lived live longest: Choose the right parents. Well, maybe it’s not a choice. But genetics have a lot to do with it. Simply put: If your parents ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 24, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Marie Hartwell-Walker, Ed.D. Tags: Aging Exercise & Fitness Family Habits Health-related Spirituality Stress Diet Positive Psychology social support stress reduction Volunteer Source Type: blogs

How to Slow Down Time and Effectively Use Emotional Intelligence
ASHA Connect 2019 draws to a close tomorrow, but many of the record-breaking number of attendees will go home knowing how to trigger their brain’s amygdales to slow the passage of time during intensely good moments. Many will also understand how tapping into emotional intelligence can benefit you and your students, patients, or clients. Keynote speaker—and former Olympic silver medalist speed skater—John Coyle launched the conference with tips on improving the quality and experiential length of life. His wonder as a speed skater at how 3/100s of a second can make such a difference in people’s lives ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - July 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: Academia & Research Events Health Care News Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Professional Development Source Type: blogs

Heard at Connect: How to Slow Down Time and Just ‘ Do You ’
ASHA Connect 2019 draws to a close tomorrow, but many of the record-breaking number of attendees will go home knowing how to trigger their brains’ amygdalas to slow the passage of time during intensely enjoyable moments. Many will also understand how tapping into emotional intelligence can benefit them and their students, patients, or clients. Keynote speaker—and former Olympic silver medalist speed skater—John Coyle launched the conference with tips on improving the quality and experiential length of life. His wonder as a speed skater at how 3/100s of a second can make such a difference in people’s...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - July 20, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Shelley D. Hutchins Tags: Academia & Research Events Health Care News Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Professional Development Source Type: blogs

How Large Is American Government?
America ’s strong economic growth and high living standards were built on our relatively smaller government. U.S. per capita income is higher than nearly all major countries and our government spending is still somewhat less.However, America ’s lower-spending advantage has diminished. TheOECD publishes data on total federal-state-local government spending as a percentage of GDP for its member countries. The chart shows spending for the United States and for the simple average of 30 OECD countries which have data back to 1995. These are high-income countries such as Canada, Germany, and Japan.The chart shows tha...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Sunday Sermonette: Take the long way home
Exodus 13 is short enough to handle in one dose. We have seen before how awkwardly contrived this whole plot is, but this is probably the crudest example. In case you don't have a clear picture of the geography of the region, keep in mind that modern day Israel and Egypt share a border. The straight shot from Cairo to Beer Sheba is overland, through the Sinai desert. Joseph was first brought to Egypt along this trade route. You can also follow the Mediterranean coast if you like. Goshen was apparently in the northwest of Egypt so it's even closer.TheLord said to Moses,2 “Consecrate to me every firstborn male. Th...
Source: Stayin' Alive - July 14, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Psychology Around the Net: July 13, 2019
Ready for the latest on how to weaken your self-confidence (stick with us here), research on women, alcohol, and mental health, and how the Greek concept of eudaimonia can help us flourish in both personal and business life? Dive into this week’s Psychology Around the Net where you’ll find all that and more! 10 Insanely Popular Ways to Weaken Your Self-Confidence: To the approval-seekers, the excuse-makers, the second-guessers: this one’s for you. Women Who Stop Drinking Alcohol Improve Mental Health: Researchers studied the drinking habits and self-reported mental health of more than 31,000 people in th...
Source: World of Psychology - July 13, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Alicia Sparks Tags: Psychology Around the Net Alcohol Bipolar Disorder Happiness kids men mental health days Procrastination Research Schizoaffective Disorder self-confidence study women Work Source Type: blogs

Is There Such a Thing as a Free-Market Gold Standard?
Twice recently I ’ve come across arguments to the effect that, despite what some libertarians, goldbugs, cryptocurrency fans, and Fed Board candidates imagine, the idea that the historical gold standard kept governments from managing money, leaving the job to market forces, is a myth.Inhis June 24th piece criticizing Facebook ’s Libra Currency, which is being marketed as a sort of internationalstablecoin, Barry Eichengreen writes:Mercifully, Facebook avoided the idea that astablecoin will free us from the tyranny of the Federal Reserve. Typically, stablecoin purveyors invoke a mythical past in which the monetar...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 9, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: George Selgin Source Type: blogs

The Old Lady moth
As the summer moves on, so the diversity and numbers of moths (Lepidoptera) active each night grows. We’re coming to the end of the first week of July and already one night’s haul has passed 200 specimens of 40 different species, logged, identified, and the interesting and ones new to the garden photographed. Old Lady moth. Mormo maura, one of the larger moths of the British Isles 160+ moths of more than 30 species were drawn to the actinic light of the scientific moth trap on the night of 5th July. I had heard and possibly seen an Old Lady (Mormo maura) in the garden a few night’s ago, but this morning s...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - July 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Will We Be Born in 2050?
Being born and giving birth is full of pain, blood, and trauma. Many science fiction works, such as Brave New World, Matrix, The Island, or I am Mother imagine being brought to the world without actually being born in a mother’s womb. How far-fetched are these scenarios? Could the appearance of the artificial womb replace human mothers and natural birth in the future? How will we come into this world in 2050? Will we be born? The trauma of being born and giving birth The experience of being born and leaving the nurturing womb of our mother after more or less nine months is painful, bloody, and traumatic. Abrupt...
Source: The Medical Futurist - June 22, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Medical Science Fiction artificial artificial womb baby birth designer baby Health Healthcare Innovation mother sci-fi scifi society technology uterus Source Type: blogs