Our Brains “See” Beams Of Motion Emanating From People’s Faces Towards The Object Of Their Attention
By guest blogger Sofia Deleniv Back in the 1970s, the developmental psychologist Jean Piaget discovered that, if you ask young children to explain the mechanics of vision as they understand them, their answers tend to reveal the exact same misconception: that the eyes emit some sort of immaterial substance into the environment and capture the sights of objects much like a projector. Although this belief declines with age, it is still surprisingly prevalent in adults. What’s more, so-called extramission theories of vision have a long-running history dating all the way back to antiquity. The Greek philosophe...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 25, 2021 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Perception Social Source Type: blogs

Understanding Leprosy on World Leprosy Day
Leprosy is a chronic and progressive disease that primarily affects the skin and peripheral nervous system. Leprosy has been with us for thousands of years. There is evidence of the disease as far back as 4000 BC, in ancient Egypt.[1] In 1873, Norwegian physician Dr. Gerhard Armauer Hansen discovered that leprosy was caused by a bacterium. [2] Today, we call this bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, and we often refer to leprosy as Hansen’s Disease, in honor of Dr. Hansen. While leprosy caused significant morbidity and mortality in the past, cases today are rare and are curable with proper treatment. How Is Leprosy Transm...
Source: GIDEON blog - January 28, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Uri Blackman Tags: News Leprosy Source Type: blogs

When Will COVID-19 Be Over – 2021 Update
2020 has brought previously unseen challenges upon humankind. A virus that, due to globalisation, spread at an unprecedented speed, stormed the entire planet and there is only one thing that can stop it as it is now: a vaccine. And as I wrote in The Medical Futurist vaccine pledge, if you worry about the long-term consequences (which no data indicate for now after having tested the vaccine on tens of thousands of people and vaccinating already millions), you might want to wait out. But then we’ll be in lockdown for years. Over the past year several lockdowns have taken place. We adopted new habits, learned and wor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Pranavsingh Dhunnoo Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research lockdown Source Type: blogs

When Will Coronavirus Be Over – 2021 Update
2020 has brought previously unseen challenges upon humankind. A virus that, due to globalisation, spread at an unprecedented speed, stormed the entire planet and there is only one thing that can stop it as it is now: a vaccine. And as I wrote in The Medical Futurist vaccine pledge, if you worry about the long-term consequences (which no data indicate for now after having tested the vaccine on tens of thousands of people and vaccinating already millions), you might want to wait out. But then we’ll be in lockdown for years. Over the past year several lockdowns have taken place. We adopted new habits, learned and wor...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2021 Category: Information Technology Authors: Pranavsingh Dhunnoo Tags: Covid-19 Forecast Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy Telemedicine & Smartphones ptsd healthcare systems data privacy tracking coronavirus covid19 immunity passport vaccine research lockdown Source Type: blogs

83 Patience Quotes to Help You to Keep Pushing and Achieve Your Dreams
Patience is perhaps one of the most underrated qualities a person can have. Because if you are patient and keep moving forward towards your dream or goal – day after day and week after week despite the inevitable setbacks – you will most likely reach it. While whatever competition you had will in most cases have given up some time ago. In this post I'd like to share the best quotes about patience that I've found. The timeless thoughts that have inspired me to keep going even when I wanted to give up. And the ones that have helped me to reach my own small and bigger dreams. I hope you'll find something helpful ...
Source: Practical Happiness and Awesomeness Advice That Works | The Positivity Blog - January 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Henrik Edberg Tags: Personal Development Source Type: blogs

Mundane Movies Meme
I posted  a fairly simple challenge on Facebook at the weekend: Make a movie mundane by subtly altering one word in the title. I'll start..."Radiators of the Lost Ark" I expected a few friends to join in with the fun and for it to fizzle out quite quickly…I watched the first few entries dribble in and then went off and did something completely different. When I came back to Facebook a few hours later there were more than 500 comments, it quickly got to 600 and I added a few more of my own. It’s still going on, at the time of writing 745 comments, which is almost viral for one of my posts. I&rsqu...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - January 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Sciencebase Source Type: blogs

Fun brain teaser to test your cognitive skills during International Brain Teaser Month
Memory relies mostly on the temporal lobes (see green area) and also the frontal lobes (red), so those are the areas that will get some good neuronal activation when readers raised in the US try to remember the missing words in the American proverbs below. Now, if you were raised outside the US and are not familiar with those proverbs you will have to use your reasoning skills more than your memory skills — In that case, frontal lobe activation will be wider and more intense. Conversely, if you were raised in the US you will find the international proverbs below to be more challenging. You will not be able to remembe...
Source: SharpBrains - January 8, 2021 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Pascale Michelon Tags: Brain Teasers brain puzzles for adults Brain-games brain-puzzles brain-teaser-puzzles cognitive-exercise frontal-lobes improve-memory International Brain Teaser Month logic-puzzle logical-skills mind-teasers proverbs puzzle games Source Type: blogs

Inside Schizophrenia: Evolution of Schizophrenia Treatments
Schizophrenia has been around since the dawn of time but actually treating it has only been around the past 100 years. In this episode host and schizophrenic Rachel Star Withers takes you through the dark and disturbing evolution of schizophrenia treatments. From systematic euthanasia to hydrotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy to the infamous lobotomy. Were these doctors “mad scientists” torturing the mentally ill or were they the only ones trying to help a population of people seen as a burden? About our Guest Miriam Posner is an assistant professor at the UCLA School of Information. She holds a Ph.D. in Film ...
Source: World of Psychology - December 9, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Rachel Star Withers Tags: Brain and Behavior General History of Psychology Inside Schizophrenia Mental Health and Wellness Psychiatry Psychotherapy Brain Disorders ECT Electric shock Electroconvulsive Therapy Frontal Lobotomies History Of Mental Illness H Source Type: blogs

2 easy, affordable, plant-centered dinners
Plant-based diets have taken root in American culture in recent years, mostly thanks to the growing realization about the health benefits of this eating pattern. But contrary to what some people think, plant-based doesn’t necessarily mean you must forego all animal products. Rather, you might just eat meat or dairy products less frequently, or in smaller portions. To replace those lost calories, you should eat more beans and legumes, vegetables, whole grains, and fruits. These mostly low-fat, nutrient-rich foods have been linked to improvements in many health-related issues, including high blood pressure, diabetes, a...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Cooking and recipes Food as medicine Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

Quarantine snacking fixer-upper
The “battle of the bulge” gained a new foe this year: quarantine snacking. Sales of snack foods like cookies and crackers shot up in the early days of lockdowns, and recent consumer surveys are finding that people have changed their eating habits and are snacking more. We don’t yet have solid evidence that more snacking and consumption of ultra-processed food this year has led to weight gain. While memes of the “quarantine 15” trended on social media earlier this year, only a few small studies have suggested a link between COVID-19-related isolation and weight gain. But you don’t need sc...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Heidi Godman Tags: Diet and Weight Loss Healthy Eating Nutrition Source Type: blogs

Pneumonia – “a disease of the ancients”
Doctor examining a lung radiography   The COVID-19 pandemic has been a painful reminder of how important lung health is. But there are many other threats to this very vital organ. Numerous lung diseases have plagued the human race throughout history, and doctors have been working tirelessly to find effective means of beating them – a battle that continues to the present day.  While many diseases cause symptoms in the lung, several of them attack this organ directly. “Pneumonia” is not a single disease, but rather a generic term for inflammatory conditions affecting the lungs. Pneumonias affect h...
Source: GIDEON blog - November 12, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

How to recognize a ministroke or stroke — and what to do
If you suddenly experience a strange but fleeting symptom — your arm or face suddenly feels weak or numb — you might be tempted to brush it off, especially if it’s short-lived. But if those odd, unexplained symptoms last more than a few seconds, they could signal a transient ischemic attack, or TIA. Commonly referred to as a ministroke, a TIA is caused by a temporary lack of blood in part of the brain. Most of the time a blood clot is to blame, and the symptoms resolve quickly because your body’s natural clot-dissolving action restores blood flow. But according to the American Stroke Association (AS...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Health Healthy Aging Hypertension and Stroke Neurological conditions Source Type: blogs

The painful side of narcissism
Narcissism is a term that has roots in Greek mythology, and as the story goes, a nymph named Echo fell in love with a handsome young man named Narcissus, who loved nobody but himself. Echo had previously been cursed by a vengeful goddess who took from her the ability to form her own words. Thus, […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 5, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/anjani-amladi" rel="tag" > Anjani Amladi, MD < /a > < /span > Tags: Conditions Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Podcast: Understanding Emotional Abuse
What are the signs of emotional abuse? Can you be a victim or a perpetrator and not even know it? In today’s podcast, we welcome psychotherapist Beverly Engel who explains how emotional abuse can sometimes slide under the radar and may even be mistaken as care. In truth, it’s all about control. Join us for a nuanced discussion on the many forms of emotional abuse and how to detect it. SUBSCRIBE & REVIEW   Guest information for ‘Beverly Engel- Emotional Abuse’ Podcast Episode Beverly Engel is an internationally recognized psychotherapist and an acclaimed advocate for victims of sexual, ...
Source: World of Psychology - November 5, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: Abuse General Interview Podcast Relationships The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

All time best quote on “ Principles of learning and education “
Today is one of the most auspicious days in Indian traditional festive time. Saraswathi pooja, a celebration of the Goddess of knowledge and education. I would like to share one of the all-time great quotes on learning from Thiruvalluvar a sage poet who lived in the southern Indian state of (mine), Tamil Nadu in 4th -5th century BC  2500 years ago.  This Thirukural number 391 in the chapter of education goes on like this. (In the Tamil Language) In English Karka, Kasadara, Karpavai , Katrapin, Nirka , Atharkku Thaga ! It says Karka : Learn Kasadara...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - October 26, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: bio ethics medical quotes bioethics medical education principles of practice of medicine princniples of learning quotes on education Thirukuraal Source Type: blogs

Let ’s end Polio
An Egyptian stele thought to represent a polio victim. 18th Dynasty (1403–1365 BC).   Poliomyelitis dates back to ancient times, as captured in this 14th century BC Egyptian carving, detailing a typical symptom of atrophy in one or more of the limbs.  The modern name is directly derived from Ancient Greek, poliós meaning ‘grey’ and myelós meaning ‘marrow’, the latter signifying the effect on the grey matter of the spinal cord. But while the ancient Egyptians and Greeks knew about the disease, it wasn’t clinically described until the late 18th century (AD), by the ...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 25, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Disease names – what do they mean?
In the midst of the continuing pandemic, World Dictionary Day seems like the perfect occasion to consider the meaning and origin behind some of the most well-known disease names. We’ve been speaking with Dr. Steve Berger, our co-founder, to learn more. CORONAVIRUSES Let’s start with the obvious one. COVID 19, which began as a localized outbreak of “Novel Coronavirus” infection,  is now a name almost every household in the world will know. COVID-19 comes from COrona VIrus Disease which first appeared in 2019, with the disease itself being caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. SARS was a prominent name...
Source: GIDEON blog - October 16, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology News Source Type: blogs

Going Postal? Proposals for Post ‐​Office Banking in 2020
Conclusion: The Strange Persistence of Postal BankingTo paraphrase the USPS's unofficial motto, neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night —nor the evidence from unbanked surveys—have yet managed to dissuade contemporary proponents of postal banking. But there is no reason to believe that postal banking would significantly lower the number of Americans without bank accounts. That does not mean there are no suitable remedies, but th ese are more likely to come from innovative tech firms and retailers in the private sector, and from the removal of regulations that have raised the cost of keeping a bank acc...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - October 16, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Diego Zuluaga Source Type: blogs

Fermented Foods and Your Gut: Why They Are So Good for Your Health
Do you have more than the occasional abdominal upset? If you find yourself singing the Pepto-Bismol jingle most days, why not consider adding more fermented foods to your diet.  You don’t have to go to a fancy health food store to buy exotic-sounding ingredients. You probably have many staples in your pantry and fridge. Here’s the skinny on fermented foods and your gut and how they benefit your overall health.  What Is Fermentation?  You might think of the term “fermentation” in association with beer or wine. However, this food preparation method goes back thousands of years ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - October 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Landis Tags: diet featured health and fitness self-improvement fermented foods gut health self improvement Source Type: blogs

Seeing Red Or Feeling Blue? People Around The World Make Similar Associations Between Colours And Emotions
By Emma Young As an English-speaker, I might “see red” with anger, go “green” with envy or, on a bad day, “feel blue”. To me, it seems natural to associate certain colours with particular emotions — but is the same true for people around the world? And if so, do we all make the same emotion/colour matchings? These questions have been investigated in a new study, published in Psychological Science, which has produced some fascinating results. An international team of 36 researchers, led by Domicele Jonauskaite at the University of Lausanne, analysed data gathered throug...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - October 6, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cross-cultural Emotion Perception Source Type: blogs

NATO ’s Rogue Member Meddles in Another Conflict
Ted Galen CarpenterThis week,armed clashes erupted between the forces of Armenia and Azerbaijan, exacerbating already serious tensions in the Caucasus.The underlying reason for the latest incident is the long ‐​standing struggle between the two countries for control of Ngorno‐​Karabakh.That ethnically Armenian region is legally part of Azerbaijan, but Armenia assumes responsibility forguaranteeing the minority enclave ’s self‐​declared political independence. The inherently unstable arrangement has led to several previous outbreaks of violence over the past three decades, but the latest incident seems esp...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 29, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

"At the end of our lives, we all become philosophers"
"At the end of our lives, we all become philosophers" is a quote from the podcast episode "Life Lessons From Dead Philosophers" by AoM:https://www.artofmanliness.com/articles/podcast-643-life-lessons-from-dead-philosophers/The Greek word “philosophy” (philosophia) is a compound word, composed of two parts: 'Philos' (love) and 'Sophia' (wisdom), "love of wisdom". Eric Weiner traveled thousands of miles around the world to visit the haunts of philosophers as he sought to better understand their insights and how he might apply them to his own life. He wrote about this philosophic...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - September 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Philosophy Psychology Source Type: blogs

Streptomyces – the smell of life
The Mall in Central Park, New York City in late autumn on a rainy day   Did you know that humans can detect the smell of wet soil 200,000 times better than sharks sense blood? [1] It appears our olfactory abilities are not that bad after all, at least when it comes to finding potential sources of food. Petrichor, the term to describe the scent was coined in 1964, by scientists I. Bear and R.G. Thomas, meaning “petros” – stone and “ichor” – the blood of the gods [2] in Greek. Divine or not, Streptomyces is a genus of over 800 bacterial species and subspecies responsible for the eart...
Source: GIDEON blog - September 15, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Kristina Symes Tags: Epidemiology Microbiology News Source Type: blogs

Suspension Therapy for Pressure Injuries: A Rediscovered Footnote to Nazi Medicine
Shortly after the end of WWII, a British medical officer inspecting a military hospital in Germany observed a treatment for pressure injuries developed by Nazi doctors.  The officer’s name was Captain James Fulton Neil and his case report was published in the British Medical Journal along with a photograph of the unfortunate patient reproduced above.  The treatment employed suspension by wires drilled into pelvic bones, and I discovered Captain Neil’s article while researching the history of wound care. This post is a summary of my paper recently published in Advances in Skin & Wound Care that des...
Source: Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - September 14, 2020 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Jeffrey M Levine Tags: Featured Medical Articles Geriatric Medicine Pressure Injuries & Wound Care bedsore bedsores decubiti decubitus ulcer Jeff Levine MD Jeffrey M Levine MD medical history pressure sore pressure sores pressure ulcer pressure ulcers Source Type: blogs

An Old NATO Nightmare Returns: Possible War between Greece and Turkey
Ted Galen CarpenterU.S. and other Western leaders have longworried about what to do if an armed conflict ever erupted between two NATO members.Rapidlyrising tensions between Greece and Turkey, primarily involving a maritime dispute over oil, natural gas, and other resources under the eastern Mediterranean, have brought that nightmare to the surface once again.Germany ’s Foreign Minister, Heiko Maas,warned both governments in late August against further military escalation. “Fire is being played with and any small spark could lead to catastrophe,” he stressed.The heart of the North Atlantic Treaty is ...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - September 10, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Ted Galen Carpenter Source Type: blogs

A Tale of Two Elders
Concern for elderly relatives and friends has been heightened during the coronavirus pandemic.   In the last month, I have visited two nonagenarians:  one was in the assisted living portion of a large multi-level care facility; the other, in her own home.  In both, frequent hand washing or sanitizing by visitors was done.  The assisted living … Continue reading "A Tale of Two Elders" (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - September 6, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: D. Joy Riley Tags: Health Care assisted living bioethics COVID-19 Elder Care Greece nursing home beds syndicated United States Source Type: blogs

How COVID-related stress can disrupt your brain circuits and nine tips to prevent it
COVID-19 has touched each of us somehow. Many now recognize that caring for our mental health is as essential as addressing the virus if we are to emerge stronger, more connected and more resilient. The Ancient Greeks said “know thyself” to live soundly, but it is only now that we have the technology to start understanding how our individual experiences arise from the complexity of our brains. Gaining understanding of our brain responses offers a window into how mental health symptoms arise, and allows us to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic on mental health. At the Stanford Center for Precision Men...
Source: SharpBrains - September 3, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: World Economic Forum Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness accelerated accelerated learning Anhedonia anxiety disorder biotypes brain circuits Brain-Plasticity chronic-stress clinical depression Cognitive Fog cognitiv Source Type: blogs

PTMC : How to cross a difficult mitral valve ?
This is a PPT presentation taken from archive (Made in 2012) Please pardon , it lacks audio. PDF version : Prof SV PTMC mitral valve crossing Final message Often times I have seen my Interventional colleagues struggle more at the mitral valve crossing than at IAS puncture during PTMC. Experience prevails over Image assistance. Assessment of LA size , IAS plane , and sub valvular disease seem to be critical. Probably the secret of success which I found out was , smart guys never hesitate to repeat IAS puncture site for optimal trajectory . Over the wire technique is not forbidden. Unfortunately, TTE  guidance is of l...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - August 22, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized dr venkatesan ppt drsvenkatesan ppt inoue vs accura balloon mitral valve crossing ptmc retrograde ptmc Source Type: blogs

Teaching As a Human Trait
What did people have to talk about when language was new? They had been getting along fine without words, and suddenly they had a few, but what was there to say?Donald M. Morrison has   written a book (The Coevolution of Language, Teaching, and Civil Discourse among Humans) that proposes language got up and running as a teaching system. Speculation about teaching is common, but usually limited to teaching how to make stone tools. Opinions are mixed as to whether language was necessary to teach how to make the early tools, especially Oldowan tools. Showing without talking might well have been enough to teach how to mak...
Source: Babel's Dawn - August 17, 2020 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Blair Source Type: blogs

Leveraging the COVID Pandemic to Advance Vapophobia
Jeffrey A. SingerThere isno link between nicotine in e ‐​cigarettes and E‐​cigarette of Vaping Product‐​Use Associated Lung Injury (EVALI). EVALI cases have been traced tovitamin E acetate, used as a solvent for THC in black market vaping products. Flavored vaping products arepreferred by adults who switch from combustible tobacco smoking to vaping. Yet none of these facts prevented a federal ban on flavored vaping products from going into effect last February. Not satisfied with a ban on flavored products, vaping opponents are now trying to leverage fear of COVID-19 infection as a mean...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - August 17, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 10th 2020
This study aimed to characterize the role of BDNF in age-related microglial activation. Initially, we found that degrees of microglial activation were especially evident in the substantia nigra (SN) across different brain regions of aged mice. The levels of BDNF and TrkB in microglia decreased with age and negatively correlated with their activation statuses in mice during aging. Interestingly, aging-related microglial activation could be reversed by chronic, subcutaneous perfusion of BDNF. Peripheral lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection-induced microglial activation could be reduced by local supplement of BDNF, while shTrkB...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 9, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A man in his 40s with chest pain reproducible with palpation
Written by Pendell Meyers, submitted by George KonstantinouA man in his early 40s with history of smoking and hypertension presented to the ED with substernal and right sided chest pain of 8 hours duration. The pain had first started after a stressful event and had waxed and waned several times over the 8 hours. The pain was reproducible with palpation on the right side of the chest.Here is his initial ECG:Notice the leads configuration (this ECG comes to us from Greece).There is sinus rhythm with very small STE in V2-V3. The T waves in V2-V5 are very concerning for hyperacute T waves with increased area under the curve. C...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - August 3, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

Dollarization for Lebanon
ConclusionThe US dollar is not a perfect currency. But it needn't be perfect to provide a vast improvement over Lebanon's chaotic status quo. Annual inflation of 2 percent is far better than 50 percent. A free currency market is far better than one with price controls and discriminatory rationing. Full dollarization offers the best hope for turning the lights back on in Lebanon._________________[1] This essay contains the gist of my remarks made via Zoom to an audience in Lebanon on Saturday, 18 June 2020. My thanks to Forrest Partovi and Jalal Hasbini respectively for arranging the event and for leading the discussion.[2]...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 30, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Lawrence H. White Source Type: blogs

The Method of Loci: How Can It Improve Your Memory?
Many people have probably heard of the method of loci, but have no idea what it is. Let me paint you a picture: it is sometime in the fifth century, BC. Simonides, a Greek poet, had just finished reciting one of his poems at a banquet when he was called outside by another guest. While he was outside, the building that the banquet was being held in suddenly collapsed, leaving all of the guests gruesomely crushed underneath. In order to properly bury the guests, their names were needed, but it was next to impossible to identify the mangled corpses. Enter: Simonides. By picturing the banquet hall in his mind, Simonides rememb...
Source: World of Psychology - July 19, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Emma Parker Tags: Memory and Perception Cognition Cognitive Psychology method of loci Mnemonic device recall Source Type: blogs

How a Simple Phrase Can Strengthen Resolve
A well-said phrase can remind us how we’re not alone in our struggles — and, perhaps, more importantly, can also inspire us to push onward. Examples range from ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle’s “It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light” to contemporary author and civil rights activist Maya Angelou’s “You will face many defeats in life, but never let yourself be defeated.” When facing tough times, difficult people, and challenging situations, a simple set of words such as these may keep hope alive, strengthen resolve — and help us to keep ...
Source: World of Psychology - July 3, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tracy Shawn, MA Tags: Motivation and Inspiration Psychology Resilience Source Type: blogs

Phosphorus: Glowing, Flammable, and Essential to Our Cells
Of the 118 known elements, scientists believe that 25 are essential for human biology. Four of these (hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon) make up a whopping 96 percent of our bodies. The other 21 elements, though needed in smaller quantities, perform fascinating and vital functions. Phosphorus is one such element. It has diverse uses outside of biology. For example, it can fuel festive Fourth of July fireworks! Inside our bodies, it’s crucial for a wide range of cell functions. Phosphorus plays a vital role in life as part of DNA’s backbone. Red phosphorus helps ignite matches, and white phosphorus...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - July 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Cellular Processes DNA Source Type: blogs

RSC ’s FTO AUMF: LOL!
Gene HealyIn these increasingly grim Days of Rage and COVID, you have to take your laughs where you can find them, sometimes from unusual sources. It has come to my attention that the Republican Study Committee —the nearly 150‐​strong caucus of House conservatives—recently released a  comprehensive national security strategy entitled,“Strengthening America&  Countering Global Threats.” The “product of over 1.5 years of policy development,” this 120‐​page manifesto is “a conservative, solutions‐​oriented plan” that “advances the interests o...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - June 25, 2020 Category: American Health Authors: Gene Healy Source Type: blogs

Helium: An Abundant History and a Shortage Threatening Scientific Tools
Most of us know helium as the gas that makes balloons float, but the second element on the periodic table does much more than that. Helium pressurizes the fuel tanks in rockets, helps test space suits for leaks, and is important in producing components of electronic devices. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines that take images of our internal organs can’t function without helium. And neither can nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers that researchers use to determine the structures of proteins—information that’s important in the development of medications and other uses. Helium&rsq...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - May 27, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Tools and Techniques Cool Tools/Techniques Scientific Process Source Type: blogs

It ’s Not About Tradeoffs
By MICHEL ACCAD It is tempting to oppose the harmful effects of COVID-related lockdown orders with arguments couched in terms of trade-offs.  We may contend that when public authorities promote the benefits of “flattening the curve,” they fail to properly take into account the actual costs of imposing business closures and of forced social distancing: The coming economic depression will lead to mass unemployment, rising poverty, suicides, domestic abuse, alcoholism, and myriad other potential causes of death and suffering which could be considerably worse than the harms of the pandemic itself, es...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy Economics MICHEL ACCAD Source Type: blogs

Sunday Sermonette: A plague upon your house!
Today's excerpt is fairly short, which gives me an opportunity to say something about the origin of the Tanakh, and particularly the Torah/Pentateuch. The Torah is thought to have first been compiled around 600 BC, or perhaps considerably later. However, no documents anywhere near that old have survived. The text which is the basis of all modern Torahs and Christian Bibles is the so-called Masoretic text, which dates to around 600 AD but the oldest extant copies were made in the 9th Century. A somewhat older source is a Greek translation called the Septuagint, which differs in some mostly minor ways. The so-called Dead Sea...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 10, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Preserving Patient Dignity (Formerly Patient Modesty) Volume 111
Discussion Blog)
Source: Bioethics Discussion Blog - May 8, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Source Type: blogs

A Stay-at-Home Self-Analysis
I woke up a few days ago and forgave myself. For everything. It was ok to be me and every decision I had made, good or bad, was part of my upbringing, environment and genetic make-up. It’s ok that I am anxious and battle addictions. The stay at home order has enabled me to think, to analyze and to let go. I loved my parents, but boy, were they characters. My handsome Italian father, was obsessed with his weight and being a golf pro at a club on the south side of Chicago. That was his persona, his life, his true love. Playing golf, schmoozing and interacting with people who had a lot more money than he ever would have...
Source: World of Psychology - May 8, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Felicia Carparelli Tags: Abuse Addiction Anger Inspiration & Hope Personal Recovery Addiction Recovery Anger Management coronavirus COVID-19 Divorce Forgiveness pandemic Personal Growth Self-reflection Substance Abuse Source Type: blogs

Strategies to foster meaningful connection during telemedicine visits  
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended health care, with telemedicine emerging as a strategy to reduce risk exposures for patients and clinicians. Originating from the Greek root t ēle-, tēl-, tēle meaning “far off, afar, at or to a  distance,” telemedicine encompasses virtual clinical services. Video visits, in particular, can be effective for many types of clinical care and offer convenience […]Find jobs at  Careers by KevinMD.com.  Search thousands of physician, PA, NP, and CRNA jobs now.  Learn more. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 28, 2020 Category: General Medicine Authors: < span itemprop="author" > < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/megha-shankar-meredith-fischer-cati-g-brown-johnson-nadia-safaeinili-marie-c-haverfield-jonathan-g-shaw-sonoo-thadaney-israni-abraham-verghese-donna-m-zulman" rel="tag" > Megha Tags: Physician COVID-19 coronavirus Infectious Disease Mobile health Source Type: blogs

6 self-care steps for a pandemic — always important, now essential
Airline attendants say it well: if the plane hits turbulence and the oxygen masks come down, place a mask on yourself first before turning to help others. This is absolutely critical. If we don’t, we may not be able to help anyone. Well, we’ve all hit the same turbulence, folks, and we all need to take good care of ourselves, our bodies, and our minds. Healthcare providers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic absolutely have to be functioning well in order to do their jobs well. At such a stressful time, with so much change and uncertainty, combined with the pressures of patient care during this pande...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Exercise and Fitness Health Healthy Eating Mental Health Source Type: blogs

Home-cooked meals with less salt
With more people staying at home these days, there’s more opportunity to prepare homemade meals. Although home-cooked meals tend to be much lower in salt than what you’d get from a restaurant, you still need to be careful, says Liz Moore, a dietitian at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). Why worry about salt? Most Americans consume far too much sodium, which raises blood pressure and the risk of heart disease. On average, we consume around 3,200 milligrams (mg) per day. That’s about 30% more than is recommended by the federal dietary guidelines, which advise people to limit t...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julie Corliss Tags: Cooking and recipes Health Healthy Eating Hypertension and Stroke Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 13th 2020
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

All About Grants: Basics 101
Note to our Biomedical Beat readers: Echoing the sentiments NIH Director Francis Collins made on his blog, NIGMS is making every effort during the COVID-19 pandemic to keep supporting the best and most powerful science. In that spirit, we’ll continue to bring you stories across a wide range of NIGMS topics. We hope these posts offer a respite from the coronavirus news when needed. Scientific research requires many resources, which all require funding. Credit: Michele Vaughan. Scientific inspiration often strikes unexpectedly. The Greek mathematician and inventor Archimedes first thought of the principles of vo...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - April 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Being a Scientist Scientific Process Training Source Type: blogs

Rejuvenation of Immune Function is One of the More Important Outcomes to Engineer through the Treatment of Aging
One would hope that it does not require an ongoing pandemic and related hysteria to point out that old people have poorly functioning immune systems, and thus suffer disproportionately the burden of infectious disease. But perhaps it does. The 2017-2018 seasonal influenza, a modestly more severe occurrence of something that happens every year, killed something like 60,000 people in the US alone, with little notice or comment. There is nothing so terrible that it won't be accepted - ignored, even - if it is normal. Floodgates of funding for infectious disease research and development have been opened in response to C...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 6, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Exploring the human brain and how it responds to stress (1/3)
__ Worry is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do, but it gets you nowhere. — Erma Bombeck The brain is the control center for all of our thoughts, actions, attitudes, and emotions. It’s the pilothouse on the riverboat of our lives. It’s Mission Control for all of our flights into space or time. It’s the air traffic controller that helps us navigate and reroute our paths based on incoming and outgoing information and how we’re feeling about it at the time. It’s the John Williams of our personal symphony. It’s the Mother Ship to our Starfleet; it’s … (Uh, s...
Source: SharpBrains - April 6, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Jerome Schultz Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness human-brain neurological neuropsychologist Stress Stress Response Source Type: blogs

Living Inside While the Coronavirus Is Outside
The outbreak of coronavirus has rocked our world and caused all of us to isolate in ways we never dreamed of doing before. For some of us who have a severe mental health illness diagnosis, this isolation is more than we might have ever experienced with our most extreme symptoms. While I have to fight my tendency to self-isolate as a result of my schizoaffective diagnosis, recent days have caused me to think about my routine and how it can, not only keep me safe from the virus, but enable me to have a productive life. While I value my routine, I have had to search for more ways to keep myself actively involved in life. Bef...
Source: World of Psychology - March 31, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jason Jepson Tags: Antipsychotic Personal Schizophrenia coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic Psychosis quarantine Schizoaffective Disorder Source Type: blogs