Case of the Week 635
This week's case features a fun finding in a concentrated wet prep of stool stained with iodine. The case and photograph are from Blaine Mathison and Madison Sant. The object below measures approximately 35 micrometers in diameter. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 19, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 634
 This week's case was generously donated by Dr. Jos é Poloni. The following was found in a stool specimen. Identification? Significance? (you may need to click twice on the video below to play)  (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 12, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 634
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 634: Free-living mite, likely contaminant during specimen collection/preparation.Note the 8 legs (consistent with a member of the arachnidae) and the long spines (setae). It is easier to appreciate all 8 legs by carefully watching the video in this case.As noted by Marc Couturier, " I mite have to say this is a contamination of the preparation and not coming from stool. "  I agree with this assessment! While this mite could have been ingested from a food source (e.g., mimolette cheese;see my previous post), I find it highly unlikely that the mite would still be alive ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 11, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 633
 This week's case was generously donated by Dr. Neil Anderson. The following structure was retrieved from the common bile duct during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The patient is a refugee from Tanzania who presented with intermittent abdominal pain, distended gallbladder and hepatosplenomegaly. This was one of many " worm like " structures noted on ERCP.  Unfortunately this object appeared to tear during removal. The portion submitted measures several centimeters in length. No identifying external structures were identified.Dr. Anderson's team tried to express eggs from th...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 6, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 633
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 633:Fasciola hepatica Although the fluke was sadly torn in half during retrieval, it has all of the features that allows us to identify it:As a trematode - it has the flat, leaf-like body shape of a platyhelminth belonging to the Trematoda phylum. On histopathologic examination, trematodes have an outer tegument (with microvillus border, and often with spines), spongy parenchyma with no large cavities, and a digestive tract. Cestodes have a similar appearance, but may have a large cavity (depending on the species and stage), do NOT have a digestive tract or tegumental spin...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 4, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 632
 This week's case has a fun little twist. The following structures were seen within the mucosa in an intestinal biopsy (hematoxylin and eosin stained) of a patient in sub-Saharan Africa. The largest of these measured>120 micrometers long.Then there was this...Diagnosis? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 29, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 632
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 632:Schistosoma mansonieggs. An adult fluke is also seen - yikes! Note that the eggs are very'fresh'appearing, with large viable-looking nuclei. This is very different than old calcified eggs that may also be seen in tissue sections. The egg has a prominent lateral spine present which allows us to provide a species-level identification:Remember that we must exercise caution when interpretingSchistosomaeggs in tissue since there is often a lot of distortion with production of spiky protrusions that occurs during tissue processing. A true spine should be thick and well-defined (such as in t...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 28, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 631
 Here is a nice straight-forward case from my laboratory. This worm was found on routine screening colonoscopy. It measures approximately 3.5 cm long. Identification? What are some of the key identifying features?  (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 23, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 631
 Answer:Trichuris trichiura (whipworm), maleAs nicely pointed out by Florida Fan, " No, this worm is not so straight. It ’s totally so convoluted like the whip of “Dr. Jones” in the movie . Such a beautiful sample with all the identification details including that curved tail and copulatory spicule specific to its sex. No trick, justTrichuris trichura. This is a classic case. "Here are some of the key identifying features:The male is slightly smaller than the female; males are 3.0 to 4.5 cm long, while females are 3.5 to 5.0 cm long. Note that the head is at the skinny end - not what y...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 21, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 630
 The following are images from a stool agar culture after 3 days of incubation at room temperature. The patient has persistent peripheral eosinophilia and mild intestinal complaints.This appearance prompted further examination of the plate by light microscopy, which revealed the following (click on thumbnail for video):What is your differential diagnosis based on this information? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 15, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 630
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 630:  nematode larvae; primary differential isStrongyloidessp., hookworm,Trichostrongylus,and free-living nematodes (e.g.,Rhabditissp.). The agar plate culture (a.k.a., Koga plate) is a relatively safe and straight-forward method to increase detection ofS. stercoralisin feces, and can also be used to culture other nematodes by allowing the eggs in feces to hatch and mature. The procedure is performed by placing a small amount of stool (as shown here) in the center of a nutrient agar. Any agar that supports the growth of enteric bacteria will do, including sheep blood a...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 15, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 629
 This week's case is from my laboratory. The following structures were found in a concentrated stool specimen from a middle-aged man from Ethiopia. They measure approximately 65 micrometers in length. What is the most-likely identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 9, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 629
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 629: hookworm ova - eitherAncylostoma duodenaleorNecator americanus. As stated well by Sam, "Finally! An end to the " is this hookworm? " trilogy. Haha 😁 " You can see a couple of good examples of hookworm egg mimics in my last two cases.He and TheOracle also noted that the second image had Charcot-Leyden crystals, a breakdown product of eosinophils:Idzi commented that "If you would ask for the " most-likely " identification, I'd dare guessing " Ancylostoma duodenale " - not per s é due to the fact that the patient is ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 7, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 628
 This week's case if from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. It looks somewhat similar tolast week's case, but it is very different! The following objects were seen in a stool specimen from a middle-aged male with recent travel to Senegal.Thoughts? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 1, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 628
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 628: Parasitic plant nematode eggs (e.g.,Heterodera sp.,Meloidogynesp., Meloidogyne sp.); not a human parasite. Sarah Sapp was the first to get this one (nice job Sarah!). She commented on ourCreepy Dreadful Wonderful Facebook page that " I suspect this could be spurious passage ofMeloidogyne (root knot nematode) eggs —size looks consistent, and also the very rounded ends with a concave broad side. "  While we didn't identify the actual genus of the nematode, we can say with confidence that this is a plant nematode based on the large...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 28, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 627
This week's interesting case was donated by Dr. Karine Thievierge and Alexandra. The following structures were seen in a stool specimen. They measure between 110 - 140 micrometers in length, by 75 - 90 micrometers in width.  Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 22, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 627
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 627: Mite eggs; finding is not of medical concernMites and their eggs may occasionally be found in human stool specimens, given that mites are all around us - in dust, on our skin, and in our food! (check out my previous case of the week onCheese Mites). Although mite eggs resemble those of some human parasites (e.g., the human hookworms), they are usually larger, and there is often evidence of an immature mite inside, as seen in this case:Here are a couple of images from Dr. Jon Rosenblatt, my predecessor at Mayo Clinic. They show 2 larval mites, including one escaping from an ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 21, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 626
 This week's post is from my own collection - A Giemsa-stained preparation of vaginal secretions from a woman with dyspareunia. The objects measure approximately 15-20 micrometers in maximum dimension. Identification?On a related topic, I had the privilege of recording a podcast with Dennis Strenk, the founder and voice of the People of Pathology Podcast. You can listen to our podcast here:Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/people-of-pathology-podcast/id1490210201#episodeGuid=peopleofpathology.podbean.com%2F21de3cca-ef03-3807-8520-c1e85a1c9300 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/0q2...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 15, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 626
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 626:Trichomonas vaginalis.The images from this case show the classic morphology of this organism. Here are some of these key diagnostic features:AlthoughT. vaginaliscan be seen in vaginal secretions, male urethral secretions, and in urine, the most sensitive detection method is a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT). This is what we use in my laboratory. Importantly, the NAAT we use does not cross-react with the other trichomonads found in the oral cavity and intestine. As Sam mentioned, " Treatment with metronidazole would be appropriate. This would be of concern if...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 14, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 625
 This week's case was generously donated by Dr. Marijo Roiko, Dr. Shifteh Vahidi, and Ms. Marnie Larsen. Marnie noticed the unusual structure shown in the image below in a urine cytology specimen from an elderly male with a history of hematuria. The structure in the image was observed on PAP stain and was a solitary finding; it measures 125 x 75 µm. What is this cool-looking object? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 9, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 625
Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 625: Not a parasite;rotiferThis fascinating " wheel animal " (from Latin rota " wheel " and -fer " bearing " ) has been seen a couple of times in the past on this blog. Check out our previous cases with great photos and videos:Case 517 (unstained with video)Case 304 (another Pap-stained case)Here are some of the diagnostic features in this case:Old one gives us a great description of the rotifer seen here: " Bdelloid rotifer with a retracted corona, large orange ovary, with 2 lateral germovitellaria with posterior stomach. Tail section appe...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 7, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 624
 This week's case is a bit unusual in that it is an environmental sample (but the parasite has relevance to human health). The following were seen in a soil sample taken from a child's playground. They are approximately 80 micrometers in greatest dimension. Most likely identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 25, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 624
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 624:Toxocarasp. eggs. Note that one is fully embryonated and contains an L3 larva. These eggs are found in the feces of the definitive hosts:T. canisin canids andT. catiin felids. Based on the size, the eggs in this case of likely to be those ofT. canis,which is slightly small than the eggs ofT. cati(80-85 vs 65-75 microns respectively). Of note, these eggs are NOT found in human feces. However, they are a risk to humans if ingested, since eggs with larvae will hatch and can cause visceral larva migrans. That is why finding eggs in the soil of a child's playground is particularl...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 24, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 623
 The following objects were seen on a peripheral blood film from a patient with chronic, worsening swelling in his groin over the past 5 years. He is from Central Africa. The stain is the Delafield's hematoxylin. Diagnosis?  (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 19, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 623
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 623:Wuchereria bancroftimicrofilariaeThis case showed all of the classic features ofW. bancroftimicrofilariae, including the sheath which was nicely highlighted by the Delafield's hematoxylin stain. The sheath may not always be seen with routine Giemsa stain; when it is present, it often appears as a negatively-staining outline only. The Delafield's hematoxylin isn't routinely performed in the parasitology laboratory, but it is in all of the classic parasitology texts as an option for highlighting microfilariae sheaths. It's a beautiful stain!Here are the features of interest:Presen...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 17, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 622
 This week's case was graciously donated by Dr. Kyle Rodino, one of our outstanding former Medical Microbiology fellows. The following specimen was submitted to the clinical microbiology laboratory in vodka (which deserves extra points for creativity). Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 11, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 622
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 622: drunken Pediculus humanus capitisThere are pretty entertaining and interesting comments that I would encourage you to read if you are interested! Here are some of the key findings in this case:Thanks again to Dr. Rodino for donating this interesting case. (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 10, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 621
Happy New Year everyone! We are going to kick off the New Year with a fascinating (and challenging) case by Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. From Idzi: While I was rummaging through the education-samples, I stumbled upon a strange-looking, small vial, containing a liquid from unknown origin. When I looked at the identification label, I was quite surprised to find a name that sounded like a very exotic parasite …During a quick microscopical examination, I found eggs of about 60-70 µm in length.Who can guess which parasite I found? Hint: the source ended up being a cyst near the ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 4, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 621
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 621:Poik ïlorchis(Achillurbainia)congolensis.Wow, I am so impressed with how many of you got this identification. This rare parasite was first described inNature in 1957 in a man from the Belgian Congo. From Idzi: Poikilorchis congolensis, or alternativelyAchillurbainia congolensis-as the genusPoïkilorchis (Fain and Vandepitte, 1957) was regarded by Dollfus as a synonym ofAchillurbainia (Dollfus, R. P., 1966. Personal communication).As far as I have found in the literature, it has been described in humans only eight times up ‘till now, although som...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 3, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 620
This week's case is a nice straight-forward one because - spoiler alert - we are going to have a really fun challenge from Idzi Potters next week to start off our new year. The following worm was found during routine colonoscopy. Identification? For'extra credit'- which end is anterior? And is this a male or female? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 29, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 620
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 620: Trichuris trichiura, a.k.a. " whipworm " . This is a male, as evidenced by its curled tail and copulatory spicule (note the location of the anterior and posterior ends):Be sure to check out the comments section to see all of the creative comments that go with this case! (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 27, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 619
 Dear readers,Wishing you and your family a very happy, safe and healthy holidays. To celebrate the season, I thought I would share a few of my favorite photographs from my 2020 calendar - all decked out for the holidays. Can you tell what they are? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 21, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 619
Answers toParasite Case of the Week 619:Trichuris trichiura, Schistosoma couple, and Hymenolepis nana. (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 20, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 618
 This week's case features some photos from a cool histopathology case I found in my archives. The source is " large single liver cyst " . Identification? What cool things do you see in these images? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 14, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 618
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 618:Echinococcus granulosus sensu lato species complexThere are many cool features in this cool case. Here are just a few that I thought were worth pointing out:First, note how you can see a portion of all of the layers of the cyst. Going from the outside-inward, you can see the compressed host tissue, outer most parasite-derived layer (laminated layer), the granular layer, and several brood capsules, each containing multiple protoscoleces.Within the individual brood capsules are many inverted protoscoleces arising from the granular layer. We even managed to get a section showi...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 13, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 617
 Here is our monthly case from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. The following were seen in a stool specimens in a patient with diarrhea and recent travel to sub-Saharan Africa. Unstained wet mount: Combined iron hematoxylin-Kinyoun stain:Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 7, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 617
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 617:Cystoisospora(formerly Isospora)belliThe diagnostic features in this case include the size of the oocyst (~25 micrometers), oval shape, internal structure (single sporoblast in the wet prep) and acid fast positivity on the iron hematoxylin Kinyoun stain.  The acid fast positivity allows us to rule-outSarcocystissp. as the oocysts of this parasite are not acid fast. Kamran and Florida Fan noted that the oocysts ofC. belliautofluoresce beautifully when examined with an excitation filter of 330 to 365 nm. As Blaine will tell us, they also exhibit a less intense fluor...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 7, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 616
 This week's interesting case was donated by Dr. Neil Anderson, one of our former outstanding Clinical Microbiology fellows. The following were seen in a bacterial culture from a stool specimen. What do you think the clinical significance is? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 30, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 616
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 616: Fly larva, presumed culture contaminantAlthough these bacterial tracks can also be seen in cases of strongyloidiasis, you can nicely see the culprit on the video. Here is a nice still image from this case:Thanks again to Neil for donating this fun case! (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 29, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 615
In the spirit of the American Thanksgiving holiday, I'd like to present two related cases that were donated by two parasitologists in our wonderful parasitology community: George from Memorial Sloan Kettering and William Sears from the NIH. I'm thankful for many things, and among them are this generous and supportive group that inspires and educates me each week. In his case, George noted the following in a stool concentrate:William was also kind enough to provide adults of this parasite, complete with more eggs (in utero and free). I've seen similar adult worms in concentrated stool specimens.Can anyone put this whole pic...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 24, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 615
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 615:Strongyloides stercoralisrhabditiform larva, eggs, and adults. Note the eggs inside and out of the beautifully-photographed adult worms by William Sears. As you may know, the parasitic females reproduce without the males using a process called parthenogenesis. This'composite'case didn't have any accompanying clinical information, but a classic scenario would be hyperinfection infection in a profoundly-immunocompromised patient.  It's important to note that it's not possible to definitely make the diagnosis on the images from this case alone, especially since the b...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 23, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 614
 This week's case is from my lab, with the photos taken by our excellent technical specialist, Heather Morris. The following structures were seen in lung cyst fluid. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 9, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 614
 Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 614: Cystic echinococcosis caused by a member of the Echincoccusgranulosuscomplex. As Clinton White nicely explained in thecase comments, " We now know that human infection is caused by several species and genotypes within what was once thought of as a single species. " The species implicated in human disease areE. granulosus(genotypes G1-G3),E. ortleppi(G5), and E. canadensis(G6-G8, G10). Most of these have a wide geographic distribution, including regions of North America, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. In South America, 2 additional species caus...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 8, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 613
This week's case is something that we only occasionally get to see in my laboratory - kindly donated by Dr. Ryan Relich. The patient presented with a past history of malaria, and she had not completed her full course of anti-malarial therapy. Therefore, her physician ordered peripheral blood films which revealed the following. Travel history is unknown at this time. It's a little hard to tell from the images, but the nuclei go to the tip of the tail.Identification?  (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 2, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 613
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 613:Loa loamicrofilariaeAlthough some readers suggested that these structures could be artifacts (e.g. fibers that got onto the blood films), we can tell that these are microfilariae by the size, shape and presence of nuclei within the worms. The tail nuclei weren't entirely visible in the images, so I gave the hint that the nuclei go all the way to the tip of the tail. That leaves us with just 2 microfilariae to consider:Loa loaandMansonella perstans. As nicely described by Idzi, the size of the microfilariae is the most important feature for differentiating these two: &qu...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - November 2, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Parasite Case of the Week 612
This week's case comes from my own lab - images by my awesome technical specialist, Emily Fernholz. The following object was submitted for identification. No clinical history was available. Thoughts? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 26, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 612
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 612: fly larva (maggot),Luciliaspecies. By using a pictorialkey from the CDC website, I would say that this is most likelyLucilia(Phaenicia)sericata,the common green bottle fly. The presence of three spiracular slits indicates that this is a third instar larva (second instar larvae each have 2 slits). Congratulations to the many viewers who wrote in with the correct answer! As nicely explained by Idzi, Jeff, Florida Fan and Kosta, the appearance of the spiracular plate (straight slits, complete peritreme), and lack of an accessory oral sclerite points to this being&nb...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 26, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 611
 This week's lovely case is from Dr. Phillip Heaton. The following was submitted to his laboratory for identification. What is shown here? And what does the red arrow in the first image point to? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 19, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 611
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 611: Female crab louse,Pthirus pubis, with an egg. She's a mom to be!Florida Fan pointed out that we would be able to tell that this was a female louse, even if she wasn't gravid, due to the somewhat flattened, indented posterior (vs. the rounded posterior of the male).Dr. Heaton was also kind enough to provide a beautiful egg (nit) from this case. It shows the classic features of aP. pubisnit, with a raised operculum:This is in comparison to the flattened operculum ofPediculus humanuseggs:Be sure to read the comments for some fun and helpful information, including an explanation fr...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 18, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 610
I have a fun case for you this week from Dr. Richard Bradbury! The following structures were seen in a stool sample from 2-year old child from a rural southern Australia with mucoid diarrhea, abdominal pain and poor weight gain. Both an unstained web prep and iodine-stained prep are shown. The size of these objects ranges from 26 –32 μm long by 16–17.5 μm wide. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 13, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs