Case of the Week 598
Welcome to the first case of the month provided by Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. The following object was obtained during colonoscopy from a 35-year-old woman. It measures approximately 4 cm in length. Travel history is unknown. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 6, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 597
This week's case is very timely, as we are seeing a lot of these objects in some of our stool specimens submitted for routine ova and parasite exam. They measure approximately 8-10 micrometers in dimension (shown at 500x and 1000x). Identification? What additional stain or study would you like to do? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 29, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 597
Answer:Cyclospora cayetanensisoocysts, unsporulatedI figured this was a very timely posting, as we are currently experiencing an outbreak of cyclosporiasis in the Midwestern United States. It's a good reminder to keep an eye out for these round refractile structures in routine stool preparations and follow-up with confirmatory testing (e.g., modified acid fast, modified safranin, examination for autofluorescence, molecular amplification).I also figured this was a timely case for my United States readers as the confirmatory modified acid fast and safranin stains provide beautiful red, white and blue images for the 4th of Ju...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 28, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 596
This week's case was donated by Dr. Bobby Boyanton. The images show cross-sections of an appendix from a young girl with chronic abdominal pain. The pathologist became concerned when they saw the following objects within the lumen of the appendix (taken using 4x, 10x, 20x, 20x and 40x objectives, respectively). Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 22, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 596
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 596: Plant material; likely plant epidermis from leafy material. There appears to be a cuticle present, and part of an epidemal cell layer attached.There are several nice images of dichotomous leaf epidemal structureHERE. Mary Parker, a botanist, noted that " in aqueous conditions, I  would expect an epidermal layer to curl with the cuticle inwards (which is the case in the images) as the cuticle is waterproof and doesn't swell, whereas the epidermal cells would be hydrated and expand forcing the layer into a spiral. " Thank you Mary for your valuable input! Mary has also p...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 21, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 595
This week's case was generously donated by Dr. Marc Couturier and Blaine Mathison. The patient is a young adult male from the South Central United States. No travel history is available. Review of his peripheral blood film reviewed the following:Identification? What are the structures seen in the last 2 images? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 15, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 595
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 595:Plasmodium vivaxwith exflagellated microgametocytes. Free microgametes are seen.The following excellent description was written by Marc Couturier and Blaine Mathison, the contributors of this case.There are several features of this slide that are supportive forP. vivax.First, many of the infected cells are reticulocytes (which are larger than mature RBCs), whichP. vivaxandP. ovalehave predilection to infect. Second, the gametocytes are enlarged and fill almost the entire space within the parasitized RBC. Some of the infected RBCs also take the shape of neighbouring RBCs (distorted, pl...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 14, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 594
This week's case was donated by Florida Fan - a lovely classic protozoan parasite seen in a concentrated wet prep of stool, and trichrome-stained specimen. Each line on the scale bar in the first 2 images represents 2.5 micrometers. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 9, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 594
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 594:Entamoeba colicysts and trophozoite.This case shows all of the classic features ofEntamoebacoli, with large organisms and, most importantly, cysts that contain more than 4 nuclei. According to theCDC DPDx, " karyosomes may be compact or diffuse and are usually eccentrically located. Peripheral chromatin is present and is often coarse, granular, and irregularly arranged along the nuclear membrane but may be more uniform. The cytoplasm of mature cysts may contain diffuse glycogen. Chromatoid bodies are seen less frequently than in E. histolytica. When present, they are usually spli...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 7, 2020 Category: Parasitology Tags: amoeba Entamoeba histolytica Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 593
This week's case is from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine Antwerp. Warning - it's a tough one! The patient is a young woman with recent travel to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. While there, she worked with primates, and developed a short episode of fever, rash and diarrhea. Upon return to Belgium, a check-up was done, including a stool parasite exam. Apart fromGiardia duodenalis andTrichuris trichiura, the following structures were found (measuring about 50 to 55 µm in length). What is your differential diagnosis? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 2, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 593
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 593:Strongyloides fuelleborniThis fascinating zoonotic parasite is endemic to parts of sub-Saharan Africa and infects both human and non-human primates. It is likely under-reported, which may be due to the resemblance of its eggs to those of the hookworms. Unlike hookworm eggs which are shed in an unembryonated state, the eggs ofS. fuellebornitypically contain fully-developed larvae.Similar appearing eggs with larvae may also be seen with heavy infections withStrongyloides stercoralis; however, the eggs are seen in conjunction with larvae, and occasionally adult worms, which are not seen ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 31, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 592
This week's interesting case was donated by Drs. Lee Decollings and Dejan Nikolic. The patient is a middle-aged male with travel approximately 2 months ago to Ethiopia, Nigeria and Cameroon. In the past few years, he has also traveled broadly in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and South America. He presented with fever and myalgias following a recent medical procedure.Diagnosis? Where did he likely acquire this infection? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 26, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 592
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 592:Plasmodium malariae;likely recrudescent infection, given that he has been without symptoms for> 2 months since his last travel to sub-Saharan Africa. WhileP. knowlesiis also in the differential based on the morphologic overlap betweenP. knowlesiandP. vivax,the long period of time since his travel to SE Asia would be atypical forP. knowlesiinfection.Some of the classicP. malariaefeatures seen in this case are the small size of the infected red blood cells, schizonts with only 6-12 merozoites, band forms, and a basket form:A tip for those studying for boards - be sure you know the di...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 25, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 591
This weeks case was generously donated by Dr. Michele Bloomer. The following object was removed from the eye socket of an adult patient. According to the surgeon, there were numerous similar-appearing objects present, but only 1 was submitted to the laboratory. About 1 month prior, the patient had undergone surgery to remove his eye as it was involved by a large cancerous growth that had extended from his eyelid.Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 18, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 591
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 591: L3 larva of PhormiaspeciesAs Blaine mentioned, this is a case of facultative myiasis involving an existing wound. The wound was caused by removal of the eye due to a large cancerous growth. What I didn't share is that the growth had been neglected, and the wound may have been as well. Several of you mentioned that this is a third stage (L3) larva, which indicates that the larva was allowed to mature for sometime within the wound.Although we can't see the tracheal trunks to say if they are pigmented or not, the posterior spiracular plate is clearly visualized and shows an incomp...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 17, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 590
This week's fascinating case was donated by Dr. Graham Hickling. He captured the following scene that he entitled " Hatching " . What are these newborns?See them here LIVE (fast motion): (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 12, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 590
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 590:Ixodes scapularislarvae, freshly hatched from an egg mass laid by a captive female. This fascinating video was generously donated by Dr. Graham Hickling who does research on hard tick biology.While there isn't enough information present to specifically identify these ticks, you can say a few things about them from the video:The have only 6 legs, and are therefore larvae.In North America, the long mouth parts and ovoid body would be most consistent withIxodesspecies. As astutely noted by Old One, " Six legs, newly hatched, long club shaped palps, apparently no visible festoo...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 11, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 589
Happy Monday everyone! It's our first Monday of the Month, and time for our monthly case from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp.The following objects were seen in an iron hematoxylin-stained stool preparation from an asymptomatic patient with frequent travels to Asia. The objects measure 10-20 micrometers in greatest dimension.Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 4, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 589
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 589:Iodamoeba buetschliicysts and trophozoites.Note that the trophozoites and cysts have a single nucleus with a large, often eccentric, karyosome. Cysts characteristically have a large glycogen-filled cytoplasmic vacuole that is highlighted when using iodine on a wet mount preparation. The glycogen vacuole does not stain with trichrome or iron hematoxylin, and instead appears as an empty space as in this case:This organism gets its genus name from its iodine staining property (iod + amoeba), whereas the species name honors the German protistologist, Johann Adam Otto B ütschli. Note...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - May 3, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 588
This week's case was donated by the very astute microbiology laboratory at the MetroHealth System who detected an important - but unexpected - finding. The patient is an elderly man on inhaled bronchodilators and steroids for persistent eosinophilic asthma who presented with fever, dry cough and shortness of breath. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) for the SARS-coronavirus-2 (cause of COVID-19) was negative, as was RT-PCR for influenza A and B viruses. However, blood cultures grew a number of bacteria including Gram negative bacilli, and the following were noted in a stool ova and parasite exam:An additional finding was ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 20, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 588
Answer toParasite Case of the Week:Strongyloides stercoralis This is a great teaching case from both the clinical and microbiology standpoint. As many of you pointed out, the clinical presentation is classic forStrongyloideshyperinfection with eosinophilic " asthma " (likely Loeffler's syndrome due to filariform (L3) larvae leaving the gut and migrating to the lung), receipt of an immunosuppressive agent (which decreases the host's ability to control the infection), and recurrent Gram negative bacteremia. As Harsha mentioned, the " Gram negative bacteria'piggy back'on the larvae as they autoinfect enter...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 19, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 587
This week's case features objects seen in a concentrate from a diarrheic stool specimen. The objects measure approximately 60 micrometers in greatest dimension. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 13, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 587
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 587:Balantioides(formerlyBalantidium, Neobalantidium)coli.Note the characteristic circumferential cilia and large " kidney bean " shaped macronucleus:I was impressed by how many people knew about the complicated taxonomy of this organism. Blaine Mathison and I had published onNeobalantidium coliin our Medical Parasitology Taxonomy Update (J Clin Microbiol. 2019;57:e01067-18) only to discover shortly afterwards thatBalantioideshas priority overNeobalantidium(we are now working on a correction).From our research, we discovered that Alexeieff was the first to describeBalantioides&n...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 12, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 586
It's now time for our monthly case by Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp:The following structures were found in an unstained wet mount from a Belgian patient without any recent travel abroad. The patient reports intestinal discomfort for approximately 1 week. The structures measure approximately 20 micrometers in length.Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 7, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 586
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 586: Mushroom spores. Not a parasite.As many of you pointed out, mushroom spores are a challenging parasite mimic, resembling hookworm eggs,Cystoisospora bellioocysts, andGiardiacysts. Fortunately, you can rule out the first two based on the small small size of these objects (20 micrometers long), whereasG. duodenaliscan be ruled out by the lack of internal structures (e.g., nuclei, axoneme, median bodies). Two other viewers initially thought there was a lateral spine present (indicatingSchistosoma mansoni) but later realized it was just an artifact.Florida Fan pointed out that I ha...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - April 5, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 585
And now for something completely unrelated to COVID-19.For those of you able to get outdoors, keep a look out for these little critters. For those of you stuck inside, you might be happy that you are missing them:Identification?Generously donated by Florida Fan. (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 30, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 585
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 585: Hard tick,Ixodes scapularis,unengorged adult female with intact mouth parts.As several of you mentioned, it would be important to know the location for where this tick was obtained. This particular tick was obtained in Florida, although similar-appearing ticks are found on the west coast of the United States (Ixodes pacificus) and Europe (Ixodes ricinus). All three of these ticks serve as the vector for members of theBorrelia burgdorferisensu lato species complex that cause human Lyme disease (Lyme borreliosis).There are a couple of features which can get you to the genus level prett...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 28, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 584
This week's fun case was generously donated by Dr. Jos é Poloni, one of my Twitter buddies (@JoseTesser). The object below was found in the undergarments of a 35 year-old woman. No other history is provided. Identification? How would you sign this case out? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 16, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 583
This week's fun case was generously donated by Dr. Jos é Poloni, one of my Twitter buddies (@JoseTesser). The object below was found in the undergarments of a 35 year-old woman. No other history is provided. Identification? How would you sign this case out? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 16, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 584
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 583: Dipteran fly pupa, possibly a fruit fly pupa (Drosophilidae); not a human parasite.As Old One commented, " ...I probably have endless numbers of these critters residing in my kitchen waste recycling bin. Jokes on me. "This fun case donated by Dr. Poloni has some interesting morphologic features that we don't usually get to see in the clinical microbiology laboratory, such as long anterior respiratory spiracles. (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 16, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 583
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 583: Dipteran fly pupa, possibly a fruit fly pupa (Drosophilidae); not a human parasite.As Old One commented, " ...I probably have endless numbers of these critters residing in my kitchen waste recycling bin. Jokes on me. "This fun case donated by Dr. Poloni has some interesting morphologic features that we don't usually get to see in the clinical microbiology laboratory, such as long anterior respiratory spiracles.  (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 16, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 583
This week's case was donated by Dr. Daniel Cohen. The following specimen was submitted to surgical pathology for examination. No additional history was available.Like all specimens in surgical pathology, it was sectioned and made into H&E-stained slides.Identification? What structures are we seeing here? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 9, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 583
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 583: ImmatureTaeniasp. proglottids.I apologize that this was more challenging than I meant it to be. I should have mentioned that these objects were passed through the anus (sorry about that omission!)Note that the objects seen here are made up of repeating chains of proglottids, some which are longer than they are wide, consistent with aTaeniasp. rather thanDiphyllobothrium/Dibothriocephalussp.As Blaine mentioned, the far left proglottid *might* have a lateral uterine pore which would support a diagnosis ofTaeniasp.In my mind, the histologic sections don't add much to this case. They sh...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - March 9, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 582
This week's case was kindly donated by Monica Jarvis and Liliana Arias. The patient is a young child who lives on a family farm. The mother noticed " worms " in the child's stool and submitted them to the laboratory for identification.Squash preparation:What is this? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 25, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 582
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 582:Dipylidium caninumproglottid and eggs.Note the beautiful egg packets, with each egg containing a 6-hooked oncosphere:As Old One reminds us, when dealing with aD. caninuminfection don't forget to treat your pets and possibly premises for fleas! (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 24, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 581
This week's case was donated by Theodore Trejo. The following were seen in skin scrapings collected from a middle-aged man complaining of itching. The motile objects measure approximately 0.3 mm in length. Identification?View on full-screen for best visibility: (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 17, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 581
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 581:Demodex folliculorum, the human follicle mite.Demodexare fascinating arthropods that live in our follicles and sebaceous glands. There are 2 species found in humans:D. folliculorumand the shorter D. brevis. Many of us have them - especially as we get older - and they are mostly commensals, not causing any symptoms. However, they may cause rosacea and blepharitis (inflammation of the eyelids) in some individuals.As with all arachnids, they have 8 legs as nymphs and adults, and 6 legs as larvae. Adults have a genital opening right below the legs, which allow them to be di...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 16, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 580
This week's case was donated by Dr. Neil Anderson. The following objects were seen in an EDTA blood specimen obtained from a patient with recent travel to sub-Saharan Africa (note that the blood was ~10 days old when the video was taken).Identification?What additional analysis might be indicated? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 10, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 580
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 580:Loa loamicrofilariae. As noted by several readers, the nuclei go to the tip of the tail, the microfilariae are relatively large, and there is faint evidence of a sheath, all of which are characteristic features for this species. As I teach my students, the nuclei " flow-a flow-a " (to the tip) in Loa loa. Another memory trick from William Sears is that the nuclei go " lower and lower " in Loa loa. Take your pick for your favorite! Remember that the sheath will not always be seen. Size is a more definitive feature in differentiating Mansonella spp. from th...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 10, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 579
Here is our monthly case from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. The following were seen in a direct wet preparation of an unfixed stool specimen from a patient with bloody diarrhea and recent travel to sub-Saharan Africa. The objects in question measure approximately 20 micrometers long. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 4, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 579
Answer toParasite Case of the Week 579:Entamoeba histolyticaThis great case by Idzi nicely shows the directional motility of anE. histolyticatrophozoite - something that is less commonly seen in the clinical laboratory as more fecal specimens are received in a fixative. This case also highlights the characteristic ingestion of red blood cells (erythrophagocytosis) by the trophozoites.Dr. Graham Clark reminds us that non-pathogenic Entamoebaspecies may also ingest red blood cells that are in the environment, so correlation with clinical presentation, biopsy, antigen and/or PCR tests is also warranted. (Source: Creepy D...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 2, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 578
This week's case is from one of our former fellows, Dr. Rachael Liesman. The structures in question were seen in H&E-stained sections of small bowel.Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 27, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 578
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 578:Hymenolepisspecies. I agree with Blaine and Idzi that this is likelyH. nanabased on the size of the eggs, but I also couldn't see the polar filaments to be certain.What wecansee in this case are the following features:Thin outer tegument with loose underlying stroma, and segmented nature (proglottids) consistent with a tapeworm.Multipleindividual eggs measuring approximately 35 micrometers in greatest dimension, with inner and outer membranes. Internal refractile hooklets in some eggs (pink arrow heads in image below and inset). Combined, these features all point towardsHym...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 26, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 577
This week's very cool case was donated by Dr. Mike Feely. We haven't had anything like this one before on the blog!The specimen below was submitted by a young woman who found this " worm " by her arm, right below her mouth, upon waking from a nap. She reported having abdominal pain with associated diarrhea for several weeks prior to presentation, but was otherwise healthy. After being in formalin:Histologic sections (H&E):Identification? Any additional information that you would like? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 21, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 577
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 577: Planarian worm,Bipaliumspecies, commonly known as the " hammerhead worm " . This is not a human parasite. Upon further questions, the patient mentioned that she was taking a nap outdoors, thus explaining the finding of this interesting flatworm on her arm.There is a lot of great discussion in the comment section on this case, including some recommended reading. HP recommendsthis open access articlein BioInvasions Records, which includes images of both gross and histologic features, both of which are consistent with this case. The University of Florida also hasthis nice pos...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 20, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 576
Happy New Year! Our first case of 2020 was provided by Heather Arguello, my awesome Parasitology Technical Specialist. The following worm was found in a specimen obtained during colonoscopy. It measured approximately 2 mm long. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 13, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 576
Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 576:Enterobius vermicularis(a.k.a., pinworm),adult maleThanks to all who wrote in with the correct answer. Florida Fan noted the presence of several identifying features: cephalic alae confirming the identity of pinworm in this adult nematode, and the curved tail with visible copulatory spicule defining the gender as male.Meanwhile, Idzi reminded us thatEnterobius vermiculariswas formerly known asOxyuris vermicularis.This is why you will sometimes see the infection referred to as oxyuriasis. Finally, Marc shared that he knew the answer but couldn't seem to " pin " it down 😉....
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 12, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 575
Happy New Years everyone! Can anyone tell me who this little arthropod is? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 30, 2019 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 575
Answer:Ctenocephalides canis.This nice little male flea has characteristic pronotal and genal combs, and a more rounded head thanC. felis.There are other important differentiating characteristics as well (you can read about themHERE) and so identification to the species level is best performed by experts.Thanks to Anon for the lovely poem. I should have thought of this for Christmas!Anonymous said...a little late, I would have preferred a fleas navidad..fleas navidad, fleas navidadoy contraro fleas are so bad.I want to wish you a itchy ChristmasI want to wish you a itchy Christmasfrom the bottom of my scratch...Happy New y...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 29, 2019 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 574
Happy Holidays to all of my readers! Can anyone tell me who this little arthropod is? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 23, 2019 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs