Case of the Week 649
This week ' s fun case was donated by Dr. Chris Hartley. The following object was seen on from material obtained by endobronchial, ultrasound-guided biopsy (Giemsa-based stain). How would you sign this case out? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 10, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 649
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 649: Non-parasitic insect, a springtail (Collembola). As Blaine mentioned, there is no definitive evidence that it is in the actual specimen. To me, it looks like it was squished on top of the slide - perhaps during cover-slipping, or possibly in the stain/other reagents. If this was my case, I wouldn ' t include it in the final report since that would just cause confusion for the ordering provider and patient. I ' d just admire it and show it to my trainees 😊. The iridescent colors are beautiful! (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 8, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 648
 This week ' s case was donated by Dr. Seema B. The following objects were seen in a Papanicolaou-stained bronchoalveolar lavage specimen. No further history is available. They measure approximately 500 micrometers long. Most likely identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 2, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 648
Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 648: Most likely Strongyloides stercoralisfilariform larva. Recommend examining the tail to look for a characteristic " notched " tail, (which is unfortunately not visible in the images in this case), and obtaining stool specimens for ova and parasite examinations andStrongyloides agar plate culture.As mentioned by several readers, there are other filariform larvae that should also be considered in this case, such as those ofAscaris lumbricoidesand the hookworm larvae. These larvae may rarely be seen during their initial lung migration stage in association with Loeffler...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 1, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 647
 The following objects were seen on Giemsa-stained touch preps of a skin biopsy from a patient with a slowly enlarging ulcer. He had recently travelled to Costa Rica. Identification? What additional testing is indicated? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 27, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 647
 Answer:Leishmaniaspecies amastigotes within a host phagocytic cell. Note the characteristic " dot-dash " morphology of the amastigotes, representing the nucleus and rod-shaped kinetoplast:Given the travel history to Costa Rica, additional testing is indicated to determine the species ofLeishmaniapresent. Some species in Latin America are capable of causing mucocutaneous leishmaniasis - a destructive form of disease that is difficult to treat. If the patient is infected with one of these species (e.g.,L braziliensis), then more aggressive treatment is warranted. Species identification is best accomplished by firs...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 25, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 646
 This week ' s case was donated to us by Dr. Will Sears. He and his wife found the following worm in a puddle in Zion national park. This interesting worm is also occasionally submitted to the clinical parasitology laboratory. What is it? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 19, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 646
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 646: Gordiid/nematomorph, a.k.a. horsehair or Gordian worm (Nematomorpha: Gordiida). Not a human parasite. This is one of my favorite human parasite mimics. It is occasionally submitted to the human clinical parasitology laboratory - often after being found in the toilet or other body of water - and can be easily differentiated from true human parasitic worms by its long slender shape, said to resemble a horse hair. In their2012 publication, " Going Solo: Discovery of the First Parthenogenetic Gordiid (Nematomorpha: Gordiida), Hanelt et al. write: The Nematom...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 18, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 645
 This week ' s case was donated by Seanne Buckwalter, and her golden doodle, Ruby. Ruby acquired this interloper from Seanne ' s back yard in southeastern Minnesota. Identification? And do you think the geographic location fits with the identification? Finally, what pathogens does this arthropod transmit? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 6, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 645
 Answer to Parasite Case of the Week 645:Amblyomma americanumadult female tick.TheOracle nicely described what we are seeing here and its implications: " Given the position of the capitulum, we can immediately argue this is a hard tick (family Ixodidae). Even though we don ' t have a ventral picture, the number of legs, the quite long mouthparths and, more importantly, the white spot on the scutum allow us to diagnose an adult female ofAmblyomma americanum, even though Minnesota isn ' t the expected geographic location. This may possibly reflect the tremendous effects of climate change... TheOracle further c...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - July 4, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 644
This week ' s case is from Blaine Mathison and Marc Couturier at ARUP Laboratories. They partnered with Techcyte to develop and validate an exciting new system that uses artificial intelligence to identify parasites on digitally-scanned slides (see theirrecent article). Here is a case in which the following objects from a trichrome-stained stool specimen were identified by AI for the technologist ' s review. They measure approximately 8 to 9 micrometers in diameter. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 28, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 644
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 644:Cyclospora cayetanensisoocysts on trichrome stain. Additional confirmatory testing (e.g., modified acid fast, UV autofluorescence) is recommended for confirmation. As I mentioned previously, the image from this case was the display screen from the Techcyte AI analysis of a digitally-scanned trichrome-stained slide. You can see that the digital algorithm did an excellent job identifying objects of interest and displaying them to the technologist for review. Use of AI platforms is the future of clinical parasitology, as it drastically reduces the time that technologists have t...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 27, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 643
 This week ' s case is one I ' ve previously shown before, but from many years ago. It ' s so cool looking that I thought it was worth showing again. The following object was found in a iodine-stained stool concentrate by Florida Fan. Any thoughts on what it is? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 21, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 643
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 643: Not a parasite; plant material. As mentioned by Idzi, Bernardino, and Phil G-J, this beautiful structure is apeltate trichome, possibly from an olive (Olea) leaf. Bernardino Rocha provided a greatlink to this open access article and the photos look just like what we are seeing. To obtain further insight, I contacted our knowledgeable botanist reader, Dr. Mary Parker, and was pleased to hear that she agrees with our assessment! She commented that this structure is definitely a peltate trichome and could quite possibly be from the lower epidermis of a leaf of an oli...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 20, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 642
It ' s time for our monthly case from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. As always, Idzi has a great case for us - courtesy of Anna Rosanas and Pieter Guetens from ITM ' s Malariology Department: a patient with extensive recent travel - leaving Belgium to trek across rural areas of Peru, Niger, Mali, and finally the Philippines. He didn ' t take any malaria prophylaxis while traveling and now presents with fever and general malaise after being home for 3 weeks. The following are thick and thin Giemsa-stained blood films from this patient (pH 8.0). The percent parasitemia was calculated at 1%. Iden...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - June 7, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs