Answer to Case 627
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 627: Mite eggs; finding is not of medical concernMites and their eggs may occasionally be found in human stool specimens, given that mites are all around us - in dust, on our skin, and in our food! (check out my previous case of the week onCheese Mites). Although mite eggs resemble those of some human parasites (e.g., the human hookworms), they are usually larger, and there is often evidence of an immature mite inside, as seen in this case:Here are a couple of images from Dr. Jon Rosenblatt, my predecessor at Mayo Clinic. They show 2 larval mites, including one escaping from an ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 21, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 626
 This week ' s post is from my own collection - A Giemsa-stained preparation of vaginal secretions from a woman with dyspareunia. The objects measure approximately 15-20 micrometers in maximum dimension. Identification?On a related topic, I had the privilege of recording a podcast with Dennis Strenk, the founder and voice of the People of Pathology Podcast. You can listen to our podcast here:Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/people-of-pathology-podcast/id1490210201#episodeGuid=peopleofpathology.podbean.com%2F21de3cca-ef03-3807-8520-c1e85a1c9300 Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/episode/0...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 15, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 626
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 626:Trichomonas vaginalis.The images from this case show the classic morphology of this organism. Here are some of these key diagnostic features:AlthoughT. vaginaliscan be seen in vaginal secretions, male urethral secretions, and in urine, the most sensitive detection method is a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT). This is what we use in my laboratory. Importantly, the NAAT we use does not cross-react with the other trichomonads found in the oral cavity and intestine. As Sam mentioned, " Treatment with metronidazole would be appropriate. This would be of concern if the ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 14, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 625
 This week ' s case was generously donated by Dr. Marijo Roiko, Dr. Shifteh Vahidi, and Ms. Marnie Larsen. Marnie noticed the unusual structure shown in the image below in a urine cytology specimen from an elderly male with a history of hematuria. The structure in the image was observed on PAP stain and was a solitary finding; it measures 125 x 75 µm. What is this cool-looking object? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 9, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 625
Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 625: Not a parasite;rotiferThis fascinating " wheel animal " (from Latin rota " wheel " and -fer " bearing " ) has been seen a couple of times in the past on this blog. Check out our previous cases with great photos and videos:Case 517 (unstained with video)Case 304 (another Pap-stained case)Here are some of the diagnostic features in this case:Old one gives us a great description of the rotifer seen here: " Bdelloid rotifer with a retracted corona, large orange ovary, with 2 lateral germovitellaria with posterior stomach. Tail section appears to be visibly segmented with on...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - February 7, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 624
 This week ' s case is a bit unusual in that it is an environmental sample (but the parasite has relevance to human health). The following were seen in a soil sample taken from a child ' s playground. They are approximately 80 micrometers in greatest dimension. Most likely identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 25, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 624
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 624:Toxocarasp. eggs. Note that one is fully embryonated and contains an L3 larva. These eggs are found in the feces of the definitive hosts:T. canisin canids andT. catiin felids. Based on the size, the eggs in this case of likely to be those ofT. canis,which is slightly small than the eggs ofT. cati(80-85 vs 65-75 microns respectively). Of note, these eggs are NOT found in human feces. However, they are a risk to humans if ingested, since eggs with larvae will hatch and can cause visceral larva migrans. That is why finding eggs in the soil of a child ' s playground is particula...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 24, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 623
 The following objects were seen on a peripheral blood film from a patient with chronic, worsening swelling in his groin over the past 5 years. He is from Central Africa. The stain is the Delafield ' s hematoxylin. Diagnosis?  (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 19, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 623
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 623:Wuchereria bancroftimicrofilariaeThis case showed all of the classic features ofW. bancroftimicrofilariae, including the sheath which was nicely highlighted by the Delafield ' s hematoxylin stain. The sheath may not always be seen with routine Giemsa stain; when it is present, it often appears as a negatively-staining outline only. The Delafield ' s hematoxylin isn ' t routinely performed in the parasitology laboratory, but it is in all of the classic parasitology texts as an option for highlighting microfilariae sheaths. It ' s a beautiful stain!Here are the features of interes...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 17, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 622
 This week ' s case was graciously donated by Dr. Kyle Rodino, one of our outstanding former Medical Microbiology fellows. The following specimen was submitted to the clinical microbiology laboratory in vodka (which deserves extra points for creativity). Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 11, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 622
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 622: drunken Pediculus humanus capitisThere are pretty entertaining and interesting comments that I would encourage you to read if you are interested! Here are some of the key findings in this case:Thanks again to Dr. Rodino for donating this interesting case. (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 10, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 621
Happy New Year everyone! We are going to kick off the New Year with a fascinating (and challenging) case by Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. From Idzi: While I was rummaging through the education-samples, I stumbled upon a strange-looking, small vial, containing a liquid from unknown origin. When I looked at the identification label, I was quite surprised to find a name that sounded like a very exotic parasite …During a quick microscopical examination, I found eggs of about 60-70 µm in length.Who can guess which parasite I found? Hint: the source ended up being a cyst near the ear from a...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 4, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 621
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 621:Poik ïlorchis(Achillurbainia)congolensis.Wow, I am so impressed with how many of you got this identification. This rare parasite was first described inNature in 1957 in a man from the Belgian Congo. From Idzi: Poikilorchis congolensis, or alternativelyAchillurbainia congolensis-as the genusPoïkilorchis (Fain and Vandepitte, 1957) was regarded by Dollfus as a synonym ofAchillurbainia (Dollfus, R. P., 1966. Personal communication).As far as I have found in the literature, it has been described in humans only eight times up ‘till now, although some authors su...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - January 3, 2021 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 620
This week ' s case is a nice straight-forward one because - spoiler alert - we are going to have a really fun challenge from Idzi Potters next week to start off our new year. The following worm was found during routine colonoscopy. Identification? For ' extra credit ' - which end is anterior? And is this a male or female? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 29, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 620
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 620: Trichuris trichiura, a.k.a. " whipworm " . This is a male, as evidenced by its curled tail and copulatory spicule (note the location of the anterior and posterior ends):Be sure to check out the comments section to see all of the creative comments that go with this case! (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - December 27, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs