Case of the Week 604
 This week ' s case was generously donated by Dr. Peter Gilligan, and features a histopathology section of an appendix from a patient with Crohn ' s disease. The pathologist was concerned when they saw the following object in the lumen of the appendix. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 31, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 604
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 604: Plant material, not a parasite. Although the large size and round shape in section superficially resembles a cross-section of a large roundworm (i.e.,Ascaris lumbricoides), there are some key features that allow us to identify this as plant material. As nicely stated by Florida Fan, " There does not seem to be a layer of polymyarian muscle cells as well as the other anatomical components such as a digestive tube or reproductive organs and no excretory organs either " which would be seen inAscaris lumbricoides.He also adds: " when magnified enough we can see polygonal cells...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 31, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 603
 Here ' s a fun case for us this week from my technical specialist, Emily Fernholz. The following objects were seen on a Giemsa-stained thick film from a patient with recent travel to the Western United States. Diagnosis? What additional testing would you recommend? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 18, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 603
Answer to Case of the Week 603:Borreliasp. spirochetes. The history is most consistent with a relapsing feverBorreliasp., and subsequent PCR showed this to beBorrelia hermsii. As Florida Fan mentioned, this case is a great reminder that when we examine a Giemsa-stained blood film, we may find things other than parasites. In addition to spirochetal bacteria such as in this case, we can find intracellular clusters (morulae) ofAnaplasma phagocytophilumandEhrlichicaspp. bacteria, and intracellular years (e.g.Histoplasma capsulatum, Talaromyces marneffei).Leishmaniaspp. amastigotes can also rarely be seen within phagocytic...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 16, 2020 Category: Parasitology Tags: borrelia Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 602
 This week ' s case was generously donated by Dr. Harsha Sheorey. The following object was submitted from a middle-aged man with hematuria. The specimen source is urine, and accompanying instructions asked the laboratory to rule out a fluke or cestode. The patient had traveled to Southeast Asia in the past.Identification? What are the clinical implications for this patient? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - August 10, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs