Parasite Case of the Week 612
This week ' s case comes from my own lab - images by my awesome technical specialist, Emily Fernholz. The following object was submitted for identification. No clinical history was available. Thoughts? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 26, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 612
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 612: fly larva (maggot),Luciliaspecies. By using a pictorialkey from the CDC website, I would say that this is most likelyLucilia(Phaenicia)sericata,the common green bottle fly. The presence of three spiracular slits indicates that this is a third instar larva (second instar larvae each have 2 slits). Congratulations to the many viewers who wrote in with the correct answer! As nicely explained by Idzi, Jeff, Florida Fan and Kosta, the appearance of the spiracular plate (straight slits, complete peritreme), and lack of an accessory oral sclerite points to this being&nb...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 26, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 611
 This week ' s lovely case is from Dr. Phillip Heaton. The following was submitted to his laboratory for identification. What is shown here? And what does the red arrow in the first image point to? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 19, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 611
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 611: Female crab louse,Pthirus pubis, with an egg. She ' s a mom to be!Florida Fan pointed out that we would be able to tell that this was a female louse, even if she wasn ' t gravid, due to the somewhat flattened, indented posterior (vs. the rounded posterior of the male).Dr. Heaton was also kind enough to provide a beautiful egg (nit) from this case. It shows the classic features of aP. pubisnit, with a raised operculum:This is in comparison to the flattened operculum ofPediculus humanuseggs:Be sure to read the comments for some fun and helpful information, including an explanatio...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 18, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 610
I have a fun case for you this week from Dr. Richard Bradbury! The following structures were seen in a stool sample from 2-year old child from a rural southern Australia with mucoid diarrhea, abdominal pain and poor weight gain. Both an unstained web prep and iodine-stained prep are shown. The size of these objects ranges from 26 –32 μm long by 16–17.5 μm wide. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 13, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 610
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 610:Brachylaima cribbi, a parasitic trematode found only in Australia to date.B. cribbi infects land snails and slugs as first/second intermediate hosts, and employs a wide range of mammals, reptiles, birds and amphibians as definitive hosts. Thefirst human infectionswere published in 1996 by Dr. Andrew Butcher, who also wrote an excellentreview on this parasite. Dr. Butcher recently passed away, and so I am dedicating this post to him and his important work. Humans become infected after ingesting undercooked snails. The main symptoms that have been reported with infection are ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 12, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 609
 This week ' s case features our monthly case from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. The following structure was seen in a urine sediment. No further history is available. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 5, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 609
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 609: Not a parasite egg.Idzi and I debated over what this is exactly but couldn ' t come up with a good answer. I like Old One ' s, Florida Fan ' s, and Sir Galahad ' s suggestion that it could be a mushroom spore. Regardless, it is too small and irregular to be aSchistosoma haematobiumegg, and it lacks the features for other parasite eggs - all good news for the patient. Sam queried if this could be a uric acid crystal, which is a good thought. However, uric acids have a slightly different appearance in my experience (see previous postsHERE).As Sheldon, Marc and Nandhu point out, w...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - October 4, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 608
 This week ' s case is from Dr. Peter Gilligan. It ' s a histopathology image - which I know isn ' t always popular with the classical parasitologists! But I think you might be able to take a stab at the diagnosis regardless. The following eggs were seen in an ulcerated area of an intestinal biopsy. They measure approximately 30 micrometers in diameter. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 30, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 608
 Answer to theParasite Case of the Week 608:Taeniasp. egg. The eggs are those of T. solium, T. saginata,orT. asiatica, but it is not possible to tell the species from the egg alone. You can find more informations about these interesting cestodes on the CDC ' sDPDx website.Note the classic small size (30-35 micrometers in diameter) of the eggs. Each have a thick radially-striated outer wall and internal 6-hooked oncosphere. The hooks aren ' t easily visible with H&E, but they are refractile when viewed with a narrowed condenser. It is likely that the eggs were released from a mature gravid progl...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 30, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 607
 This week ' s case was donated by my colleague, Dr. Tom Grys. Tom and I did our Clinical Microbiology fellowship together and had a lot of fun! The following specimen was brought in by a patient after finding it near his eye upon wakening. He is concerned that it might be an ectoparasite or vector of human pathogens, and is hoping that the laboratory can provide this information. What is your identification, and how would you counsel the patient or patient ' s clinician? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 21, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 607
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 607: Beetle, not a human parasite. While I am not an entomologist, I fortunately have many readers who are. Blaine Mathison commented that this is likely a sap beetle in the family Nitidulidae. This was also supported by Dr. Kosta Mumcuoglu and his entomologist colleague, Mr. Ariel-Leib Friedman, MSc, who is the Coleoptera Collection Manager at The Steinhardt Museum of Natural History, Tel Aviv University, Israel. Kosta said " I am not sure about the genus, butCarpophilusandEpuraeaare most commonly associated with human surroundings and are considered minor agricultural and sto...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 20, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 606
 This week ' s case is from Sandeep T, the same individual who contributed the amazingCase 409 from many years past. The current case is less dramatic, but a beautiful example of a classic. The following were seen on skin scrapings from a young man with a 2-month history of severe itching in the back of his left ear. The physician suspected fungal infection and ordered a KOH wet mount of the skin scrapings. This is what was seen. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 15, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Answer to Case 606
 Answer toParasite Case of the Week 606:Demodex folliculorum, the human follicle mite. Like all mites, this arthropod is an arachnid, related to ticks and spiders. It is NOT an insect. Note the presence of 8 legs in its adult state.If you have time and interest, I would encourage you to check out the comments from other readers. Florida Fan reminded us how beautiful these mites look when using the Calcofluor KOH stain with UV light excitation (SeeCase of the Week 278 to see lovely little pair of mites), and Dr. Pankaj commented that the mites stain red with an acid fast stain. I will definitely have to try this! ...
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 13, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs

Case of the Week 605
 Happy Labor Day weekend to all of my American readers! I hope you are having a restful and safe holiday weekend. It ' s the first Monday of the month and time for our case from Idzi Potters and theInstitute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. A middle-aged man brought the following worm to his primary care provider. He noticed it in the toilet after a bowel movement. Identification? (Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites)
Source: Creepy Dreadful Wonderful Parasites - September 7, 2020 Category: Parasitology Source Type: blogs