TBTAM ’s Top Ten Podcasts of 2017
You know you’re a radio junkie when you find yourself scribbling not just prescriptions, but lists of podcasts for your patients to listen to on their long plane flights or drives to Flordia or wherever else they are heading for the winter months. I figured if I wrote them all down, I could save myself the scribbling and just share a link to the list. And so here, in no particular order, are the podcasts I found myself recommending over and over again this past year. S-Town Part mystery, part bizarre tale, part crazy sad but also totally wonderful and addicting. I fell in love with this guy John B McLemore, quirks ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 12, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Just for Fun best podcasts top ten Source Type: blogs

Acupressure App – Does it really alleviate menstrual cramps?
The media is abuzz over a study reporting that use of a cell phone app to train women in self-acupressure is effective as pain medication for treating menstrual cramps. The Android app is called AKUD and is written in German, so unless du sprichst Deutch, it won’t do you much good. But let’s ignore that for now. Here’s the study intervention: The study intervention Participants received a menstrual tracking App that included instructions on acupressure for cramp relief. They also got one-on-one instruction on the location of specific acupressure points and use of acupressure using drawings and v...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 12, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Alternative Medicine Women's Health app cell phone menstrual cramps Source Type: blogs

It ’s not gonna’ kill you to take hormone replacement
It’s not going to kill you to take hormone replacement therapy. That’s the take home message from the latest analysis of the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest and longest randomized trial of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in menopausal women. After almost 18 years of follow up in the WHI, there was no increase in overall mortality, including death rates from cancer, in women taking HRT for up to 5.6 years (estrogen plus progestin) or 7.2 years (estrogen alone). There was a non-significant reduction in mortality among those who started HRT between ages 50 and 59, the group most likely to ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 22, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Hormone Replacement Menopause WHI breast cancer estrogen HRT Prempro Source Type: blogs

Tomato Jam
My sisters and I are planning on putting up a some tomato jam next weekend. Before we invest a whole afternoon (and 22 pounds of tomatoes) to it, I figured I should try out the recipe at least once. I had the loveliest afternoon doing it. A gorgeous, sunny day, with the breeze coming in through the kitchen window, a batch of bread rising on the counter, NPR playing in the background, and me shuttling back and forth between the kitchen and the den, where I’m working on a little writing project that I’ll hopefully tell you about one of these days soon. It was one sweet day. As sweet as this jam – sweet and ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 5, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Canning Recipes Source Type: blogs

Einkorn No Knead Artisan Bread (and a primer on ancient wheat)
All wheat is not the same. What we now call wheat is actually the product of hybridization and cross breeding of wheat species to increase crop yields, ease harvesting, decrease costs and scale up production. As a result, where there were once just 5 or so species of wheat, there are now literally thousands, which genetically, may be virtually unrecognizable to ancient grains from which they are descended. Allow me to introduce these so-called ancient grains to you now: Einkorn Wheat (14 chromosomes / Diploid): The first known wheat ever cultivated by humans (circa 3300 BC in Europe) is Einkorn Wheat, which has just 14 ch...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 24, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Bread Artisan Einkorn Flour Lahey No-Knead Wheat Source Type: blogs

No-Knead Whole Wheat Bread
Summers in the mountains means bread. I rarely make bread at home in New York City. Not that I couldn’t. After all, this bread is easy enough to make, and despite it’s long rise time, requires very little of my attention. But thinking about making bread does require, for me at least, a relaxed, open mind. And the inward assurance that in 18 hours I will still be available to move the bread on to it’s second rise, and then to it’s baking. Coordinating that with my schedule in the city makes the bread making feel like a chore and not the joy it is when I undertake it here at the cottage. Here, the day...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - July 30, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Bread Bittman Lahey No-Knead Whole Wheat Source Type: blogs

Spinach Stuffed Mushrooms
Tired of serving the same old cheese plate and cracker appetizer? Looking for something just as satisfying and crowd pleasing but without the calories or carbs? Look no further than these delicious, easy to make, healthy spinach stuffed mushrooms. Eat them with a knife and fork, cut into quarters and you have four incredible mouthfuls. Serve with a bowl of spicy olives – there’s nothing that tastes better than a bite of each in your mouth at the same time. These mushrooms are so satiating that I’ve served them as a main dish. Add a side salad following a small bowl of soup and you’ve got a ligh...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - March 5, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Appetizers best easy Make-ahead Spinach stuffed mushrooms use bread crumbs vegetarian Source Type: blogs

Ottolenghi ’s Roasted Chicken with Clementines and Arak
One of these days, I’m going to visit Israel, if only to taste in situ the foods that inspire Ottolenghi, whose Jerusalem cookbook has become one of the most used cooking tomes in our household. The hummus recipe alone is worth purchasing his book. This recipe combines orange and anise flavors with a delightful roasted chicken. Don’t let the use of Arak, a licorice flavored liquor – worry you. The anise flavor is subtle, despite the use of both fennel and fennel seeds – and perfectly balanced by the clementines. We served it with brown basmati rice and carrots, and I us...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - January 18, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Meat & Poultry Arak Chicken Clementines Jerusalem Ottolenghi Source Type: blogs

Flageolet with Fennel and Feta
I send Mr TBTAM to the market for French Le Pay lentils yesterday, and he returned instead with French flageolet. It’s partly my fault. After all, he did call to ask before he bought. My mistake was assuming he knew what a lentil was, and instead focusing on making sure that what he was buying was actually imported from France. He did say the word flageolet, and even spelled it out for me. I had no idea what flageolet meant, but it sure sounded French to me, so I approved the purchase. Only when he got them home did I discover that flageolet are not lentils, but a type of bean. And not just any bean, but a ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - January 17, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Salads flageolet beans Source Type: blogs

Foraged Delight – The Staghorn Sumac
This is staghorn sumac (rhus thphina), whose gorgeous red fruit berries I first encountered last summer atop High Knob in the Loyalsock. Isn’t it gorgeous? The branches and berries of the staghorn sumac have a fuzzy feeling like the antlers of a deer (hence the name) and will NOT give you a rash. The stuff that gives you a rash is poison sumac. Poison sumac has a red trunk. It grows in swamps and standing water, it’s berries are white and hang down, and the leaves look like this. Got it? Good. Now stop being afraid and go get yourself some staghorn sumac. What to do with Staghorn Sumac Berries ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 18, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Meat & Poultry Recipes drying sumac making sumac spice Middle Eastern Spice Ottolenghi staghorn za'atar Source Type: blogs

Summer Fruit Cake
Labor Day weekend at the cottage with good friends. A bittersweet end to summer. Lake swimming, hiking, biking, reading, stargazing. Shunpiking* to discover gorgeous vistas, plump red sumac berries ripe for the picking (and drying for spice – I”ll post on that later) and the best garage sale ever. Making Irene’s summer fruit cake to bring to an outdoor dinner party on an evening cool enough to end inside around a burning wood stove. (Thanks Rick for leaving the stove door open so we could see the fire.) We left a day early, warned that the impending hurricane would make return to the c...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 5, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Desserts Peach and plum cake Peach cake Stone fruit cake Summer fruit cake Source Type: blogs

On Balsamic Vinegar, Proscuitto and Why Foodie Friends are Just the Best
There’s what you think is Balsamic vinegar, and then there’s this stuff. Quartro Centenario Aceto Basilica, a limited edition, 15 year old Balsamic made by the Giusti family in Modena, Italy to celebrate 4 centuries running the oldest balsamic vinegar house in the world. OMG. Thick and rich, sweet but still vinegary, full of flavor and well, just heaven. This balsamic is too special to use in a salad dressing. What you do is drizzle it on something special, in this case an open faced sandwich made with ever so lightly toasted baguette that you’ve brushed with olive ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 11, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Recipes Vegetarian American Slicer Balsamic vinegar Di Palo's Giusti Modena Prosciutto vintage Source Type: blogs

Tahcheen-e Esfenaj (Baked Persian Rice Cake with Lamb, Spinach & Prunes)
I must apologize for the infrequency of my blog posts over the past year. My new position at the medical school has kept me much busier than I’d ever imagined. Now, a year later, things are finally settling in and I’m hoping to bring this blog thing back to life, if only because the act of writing truly grounds me. One of the better parts of my new position has been getting to know our Qatar-based medical school faculty and staff, who sent me the most amazing Persian cookbook – Saraban: A Chef’s Journey through Persia by Greg and Lucy Malouf. (Thank you Shahrad and team!) This is a&n...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 7, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Meat & Poultry Lamb Rice Cake Spinach Tachchin Tah-Chin Tahcheen Source Type: blogs

New York City Garden 2016
It’s been a long year or so without our balcony herb garden. Mandatory brickwork outside our apartment started in April 2015 with a Cristo-like gauze wrapping around the entire facade and taping shut our windows and balcony door. We lived like that for almost an entire year, until finally, in April, we were allowed access to the balcony again. That’s the bad part. The good part is that I got to start the balcony garden all over again. The building had removed our handmade deck floor, so I replaced it with a wonderful and inexpensive Ikea deck floor. I also swapped out our rusting bistro set and rickety pl...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - June 27, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Gardening Balcony garden Best garden supplies NYC Garden centers NYC Manhattan New York New York City resources Urban gardening Source Type: blogs

What Women Want – How and When to Deliver the News of a Breast Cancer Diagnosis
If you’re going to have to tell a woman that she has breast cancer, she wants to hear the news as quickly as possible, preferably face to face, ideally within 1-2 days of the biopsy being done, and have an appointment set up to deal with the diagnosis either that day or the next. That’s what Dr Deanna Attai and colleagues found out when they surveyed over 1000 women, including 784 breast cancer survivors, to find out how and how soon they wanted to get their breast biopsy results, and compared that to what actually happened when they got their results. It’s no surprise that in almost all cases, when ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - June 24, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography mammogram test results waiting Source Type: blogs

Rethinking Gonad Removal in Individuals w/ Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome
Lauren in MTV’s “Faking it” has AISWhat if you were genetically male, but your body was blind to testosterone ? I’ve just described XY Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome, or CAIS, a genetic condition in which there is a defect in the androgen (testosterone) receptor gene – located, ironically, on the X-chromosome.* Describing CAIS XY (genetically male) individuals with CAIS have gonads (testes) that manufacture testosterone, but their body’s cells cannot see the testosterone. As a result, their internal and external genitalia develop as female, but the vagina is shortened and ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - June 20, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Women's Health AIS Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome CAIS Intersex Source Type: blogs

Onion & Olive Tart
Onion & Olive Tart This wonderful onion and olive tart is based on a recipe from Molly O’Neill.  Think if it as an Americanized version of the classic French Pissaladiere – a Nicoise savory tart made with anchovies, onions, olives and herbs.  The classic Pissalidiere is made with a thin pizza crust (though Julia Child made hers with puff pastry) and derives it name from its use of pisalla – a condiment speciality of the coastal area around Nice made from ground anchovies with olive oil, herbs and spices. Today, I’ve made my mother-in-law Irene’s variation of the tart wi...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - May 14, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Quiches & Savory Pies appetizers Make-ahead Onion and olive tart Onion pie Pisalliadiere Source Type: blogs

Onion & Olive Tart
Onion & Olive Tart This wonderful onion and olive tart is based on a recipe from Molly O’Neill.  Think if it as an Americanized version of the classic French Pissaladiere – a Nicoise savory tart made with anchovies, onions, olives and herbs.  The classic Pissalidiere is made with a thin pizza crust (though Julia Child made hers with puff pastry) and derives it name from its use of pisalla – a condiment speciality of the coastal area around Nice made from ground anchovies with olive oil, herbs and spices. Today, I’ve made my mother-in-law Irene’s variation of the tart wi...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - May 14, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Quiches & Savory Pies appetizers Make-ahead Onion and olive tart Onion pie Pisalliadiere Source Type: blogs

Bronx River Pathway Ride
Boy is spring ever late coming this year. Last weekend found us more than eager to finally get out in the warmish weather. Figuring Central Park would be packed, we decided to take our bikes north of the city to the Bronx River Pathway. This Greenway runs along the Bronx River in West Chester County, NY. The trail has three paved segments, which are not continuous. We chose to ride the uppermost section from Greenacres Road to Kensico Dam, about a 10 mile round trip. It’s not an entirely bucolic country ride, since the highway and civilization are never far away, but there are more than enough green spaces and p...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - April 25, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Biking New York City Bronx River Parkway Path Day trips NYC Kensico Dam Source Type: blogs

Almond-Lemon Torte w/ Strawberries
The never ending search for the perfect Seder dessert continues. This one’s coming close. Of course, my family would probably say the prefect Passover dessert has already been found in my mother in law Irene’s hazelnut strawberry shortcake. Problem is, delicious as it is, I can’t bring the shortcake to my kosher friends’ seder tomorrow, since it is served with whipped cream and the Seder is a meat meal. (My husband’s family is, as Jerry Seinfeld says, “Jew-ish”…) Hence my search. The fallen middle in this torte is a given. It’s what happens when you depend on eggs alon...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - April 22, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Desserts Almond Lemon torte Kosher Passover Seder Strawberries Source Type: blogs

Prophylactic Mastectomies Increasing Despite No Survival Benefit
One of the more concerning trends in breast cancer treatment is the growing use of bilateral mastectomy to treat breast cancer that is present in only one breast. We call this prophylactic contralateral mastectomy – or removal of a normal breast in order to prevent future breast cancer. A new study of almost half a million women with breast cancer reports that in 2009, 12.7% chose to treat cancer in one breast by removing both breasts, a rate almost triple that in 2002. Unfortunately, the additional surgery added no benefit, as survival rates were no better among women who had bilateral mastectomy compared ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - March 14, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Source Type: blogs

Maple Cheesecake with Roasted Pears
She may have gone to prison for insider trading, but Martha Stewart does make one mean cheesecake. Maple syrup lightly sweetens the cheese filling and is brushed on pear slices as they roast before being layered atop the cheesecake, made here with a classic graham cracker crust. Not too heavy, not too sweet. Perfect. Maple Cheesecake with Roasted Pears  Martha uses a vanilla wafer crust, but I prefer the traditional graham cracker crust. She broils her pears, I simply roasted them. She sprays her roasting pan with cooking spray, I brush it with canola oil. I used an Epicurious recipe for the crust because it had ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - January 5, 2016 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Desserts cheesecake maple pears roasted Source Type: blogs

False Positive Mammograms & Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk
A recent study points to a higher risk of breast cancer in women with a history of a false positive mammogram. Investigators examined the number of breast cancers occurring over 10 years with whose routine screening mammogram had resulted in either a “call back” normal mammogram or a benign breast biopsy (false positive mammograms), and compared it to the number of cancers in women whose mammogram was normal on the first go round (true negative mammogram.) Women who had a false positive mammogram had a higher risk of breast cancer in the subsequent 10 years compared to women with a true negative mammogram....
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 4, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography breast biopsy false positive mammogram Risk Source Type: blogs

False Positive Mammograms & Subsequent Breast Cancer Risk
A recent study points to a higher risk of breast cancer in women with a history of a false positive mammogram. Investigators examined the number of breast cancers occurring over 10 years with whose routine screening mammogram had resulted in either a “call back” normal mammogram or a benign breast biopsy (false positive mammograms), and compared it to the number of cancers in women whose mammogram was normal on the first go round (true negative mammogram.) Women who had a false positive mammogram had a higher risk of breast cancer in the subsequent 10 years compared to women with a true negative mammogram....
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 4, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography breast biopsy false positive mammogram Risk Source Type: blogs

Uquora – Hope, Hype and Maybe a Case of Diarrhea
Before you go out and spend $25 for 10 packets of Uquora, the new after-sex UTI prevention drink that launched today, you should consider if it actually works. What’s in Uqora? Uqora’s main active ingredient is D-Mannose (2 gm), combined with Vitamin C (600 mg), Vitamin B6, Calcium and Magnesium. (The company website does not list amounts for the last three ingredients.) The ingredients are made into a powder that you mix with water and drink. The manufacturer claims that Uqora will reduce the chance of getting a UTI if you drink it after having sex, after exercise or during travel, all activities linked to re...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 20, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Women's Health Post-coital Post-sex PRevention Uqora urinary tract infection UTI Source Type: blogs

HPV Myths – BUSTED
There’s an awful lot of misinformation out there about HPV and the HPV vaccine. Let’s see what I can do to clear up the confusion. Here are eight myths I find myself having to continually address with my patients. Let’s bust ’em! Myth#1 – HPV is forever Wrong. 90-95% of the time, HPV infections clear without any treatment. For those women with persistent HPV infection, we have pap smears to detect and treat precancerous lesions (dysplasia) years before they become invasive cancer. Myth #2 – If I’ve had the HPV vaccine, I don’t need Pap smears. Wrong again. While the HPV ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 17, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: HPV HPV & Cervical Cancer abnormal pap Cervarix Gardasil HPV Vaccine Source Type: blogs

Time Makes a Better Bread – and A Better Bread Maker
I”ve been making Jim Lahey’s bread for about four years now. My first attempt was in New York City during Hurricane Irene, when I knew I’d be home for at least 24 hours with nothing to do but make this bread. which has a 12 to 18 hour rise, followed by a second two hour rise prior to baking.  The result was delicious, though a little flat.  But hands down the best bread I’d ever baked. My first attempt at Jim Lahey’s No-Knead Bread I decided to try making bread during weekends at our cottage in the Endless Mountains, and immediately gravitated to Mark Bittman’s speedi...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 9, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Bread Jim Lahey Mark Bittman No-Knead Source Type: blogs

Treating Menopausal Vaginal Dryness
Sex is supposed to be fun, and it’s definitely not supposed to hurt. But one of the consequences of menopause is vaginal dryness, which for many women means painful sex. With the loss of ovarian estrogen, vaginal walls that were once elastic, expandable, supple and sturdy can, over time, become tightened and fragile. The vaginal walls can become as thin as tissue paper, unable to withstand the manipulation that occurs with sexual activity, and can tear and even bleed with intercourse. “Use it or lose it” When sex becomes painful, the natural response is to begin to avoid intercourse. But without continued...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - August 2, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Menopause painful sex sex hurts vaginal atrophy vaginal dryness Source Type: blogs

Smoked Trout
It only took us 10 years to get Mr TBTAM’s cousin Lou and his wife Maria up to our little town in the mountains, but it was a visit well worth the wait.  Not only did we have a great time, but Lou caught two trout in one of the feeders streams to the Loyalsock. On a warm summer day yet, when trout are supposed to be nowhere to be found in shallow waters. Of course, I smoked the trout. I’ve been wanting to make smoked trout since I first tasted it in Austria three years ago. My own attempts at fishing last year had yielded nothing more than a few tasty little perch. Now I had not one, but two 12 inch t...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - July 19, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Fish brine recipe Smoked trout Source Type: blogs

The Caya Diaphragm – What You Need to Know to Prescribe or Obtain It
A new diaphragm has become available in the United States – It’s called Caya, and it’s available in a single size and by prescription only, and is designed to be used with a nonoxynol-9 contraceptive gel. Caya was developed as a collaboration between PATH and CONRAD, two non-profits responding to the needs of women for easy to use, effective, non-hormonal, user controlled contraception. Researchers at CONRAD, in a user-centered design process, worked their way  through over 200 different prototypes to arrive at the current one-size, non-latex diaphragm, which was initially called the SILCS diaphragm....
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - July 3, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Best of Birth Control Posts Family Planning barrier contraception Caya Diaphragm HPSRx Source Type: blogs

Ave Verum Corpus
Thought I’d share this one piece from my my choral concert last month. It’s one of the most beautiful pieces of music ever written – Mozart’s Ave Verum Corpus. It’s not perfect, but I think we actually did it justice. Hope you enjoy listening to it as much as we enjoyed singing it. (I sing with the Collegiate Singers of NYC, a community choir on the Upper West Side. We performed in concert with The Plymouth Choir on May 9th at the First Baptist Church on Broadway and 79th. A wonderful space with great acoustics. Check us out if you love to sing. No audition required, though we assume you ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - June 3, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Late Night Dinner at Five & Ten in Athens, Georgia
At first, I was really, really upset that my flight to Atlanta was delayed, making us miss our 8:30 dinner reservation at Five & Ten in Athens, Georgia. This was no ordinary dinner reservation. My brother Joe and wife Rachel had arranged a special tasting meal for us with Five & Ten’s executive chef, Jason Zygmont, who they originally met when Joe stopped into the kitchen one day last year unannounced to borrow preserving salt for some charcuterie he was making. Joe returned a few weeks later to give Jason some of the duck proscuitto he had cured, expecti...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - May 5, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Restaurant Reviews Travel Athens Georgia FIVE & TEN Hugh Acheson JAson Zygmont Source Type: blogs

Haitian Griot Served with Cuban Black Beans & Rice and Marinated Cucumber Salad
If I haven’t blogged much in the way of new recipes lately, it’s because not much of what we’ve been trying lately has been blog worthy. Oh, of course, it’s been edible. Maybe even tasty. But not worth sharing with the world. But this dinner? It’s worth shouting about. In fact, I’ll go on record and say it’s one of the best meals we’ve ever made.  And worth every minute of preparation, which is not a lot of time at the stove, but does include an overnight marinade and a couple of hours braising. So save it for a weekend dinner when you can give it the time it deserv...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - March 24, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Meat & Poultry Salads Vegetarian Cuban black beans & rice Cucumber Salad Haitian Griot Melissa Clarke Source Type: blogs

NED – Gyn Oncologists Rock On to Raise Awareness & Funding for Gyn Cancers
No Evidence of Disease (NED) is the phrase oncologists use to describe a patient in remission from cancer. It’s also the name of a rock band whose members are all gyn oncologists – surgeons who care for women with gynecologic cancers. And the name of the documentary about how that band is joining with women to raise awareness and increase funding for research into gynecologic cancer. The film is a melding of the stories of these dedicated doctors and their patients, and the stories are both heartwarming and sobering. The filmmakers did a wonderful job of representing women from all aspects of our soci...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - March 9, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized NED No Evidence of Disease Source Type: blogs

Winter Citrus Salad with Fennel, Clementines and Arugula
Fridays nights in winter, Mr TBTAM plays tennis, so I’m on my own. It’s my night out with the girls or a good time to shop, get a cut and color or a mani-pedi. This Friday night, however, all I really to do was be home. It was freezing cold outside, and I knew the rest of the weekend was going to be busy. After an even busier week, I was craving some alone time. The default mode would be take out, but I wanted a good meal, not a slice or some lo mein. And something that would hold up well for leftovers tomorrow as a nice Valentine’s Day lunch with Mr TBTAM. I decided on something tried and ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - February 16, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Salads arugula citrus Clementines Fennel grapefruit orange winter Source Type: blogs

The Events – NY Times Review
The Events, David Greig’s play about the aftermath of a violent event, set on a bare stage with two actors and a community choir – got a nice review in today’s NY Times. This gutsy work by the Scottish dramatist David Greig, which opened on Thursday night at New York Theater Workshop, sets the restless pain of a mass-shooting survivor against the stolid, consoling presence of a community choir. It’s a juxtaposition that evokes Greek tragedy, in which choruses of common humanity echoed and annotated the words of afflicted heroes. And the program for this production includes a note from its director,...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - February 14, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What Should You be Worried About? It’s Not What You Think
Worriers out there – take note. You’re probably spending your precious brain energy worrying about the wrong things. If you want to know what’s most likely to kill you, the British National Health Service’s Atlas of Risk can tell you. The tool does a great job putting health risks into perspective, and can be customized for your sex and age group. It’s interesting to see how the causes of death change with age. One thing that becomes clear as you play with the risk tool. Most of the things that could kill you throughout your adult life can be prevented by three things which are in yo...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - February 13, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Women's Health Source Type: blogs

More on Breast Density Notification Laws
There’s a nice discussion of the practical considerations around breast density notification laws in this week’s NEJM. The editorial and accompanying podcast summarize what we do and don’t know about breast density, and give practical suggestions for incorporating breast density into the discussion around mammography screening for individual patients.  Online access to both the editorial and podcast discussion is free, and I encourage you to read and listen. Bottom line   Most women under age 60 will have dense breasts on mammography. Breast density is subjective, and we do not as yet have ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - February 12, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography Source Type: blogs

Stuffed Eggplant with Lamb & Pinenuts from Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem
I know the year’s barely begun,  but this dish from Yotam Ottolenghi’s Jerusalem is well on its way to being my most memorable meal of 2015. Maybe even the past decade. And this from a gal who says she doesn’t like eggplant. If you don’t own Jerusalem, you must. Every recipe in it is a gem. The day after I was given it from my dear friends Karen and Steven, (OMG thank you!), my book club was over for dinner.  They all gathered round and placed stickies on their favorite recipe in the book that I simply must make. The entire book is one giant sticky collection, but somehow t...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - February 10, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Meat & Poultry Vegetables Augergines Jerusalem Lamb Ottolenghi pine nuts Pinenuts Sami Tamimi Stuffed eggplant Yotam Ottolenghi Source Type: blogs

Dying Now
Regular readers will have noted that blog posts of late are few and far between. It’s not for a lack of interest (for I still so love my blog), but it is for a severe shortage of time.  I’m cleaning up a backlog of tasks and commitments, administrative duties, grants and paper writing, lecture preparation and giving, and in general all the things above and beyond patient care that consume the life of the academic physician. Not to mention a wonderfully full, busy personal and family life. Yep, life is good. Speaking of which, allow me to share this wonderful song I just discovered. Someone must have told m...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - February 7, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Inspirational Dying Now Eric Gundersen Source Type: blogs

Removing the Fallopian Tubes to Prevent Ovarian Cancer – Something to Consider
New information strongly suggests that most ovarian cancers originate, not in the ovary, but in the fallopian tube. If this is so, then removal of the fallopian tubes may actually prevent ovarian cancer. The evidence is powerful enough that the American Congress of Obstetricians & Gynecologists is now recommending that fallopian tube removal be considered in women planning to undergo surgical sterilization or hysterectomy. The Fallopian Tube Origin of Ovarian Cancer We used to think that ovarian cancer originated in the peritoneal lining that covers the ovaries and abdominal organs. But the fallopian tube origin of ova...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - January 23, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Best of TBTAM Family Planning Ovarian Cancer Essure Fallopian tube oophorectomy prophylactic salpingectomy Sterilization Tie my tuibes tubal ligation Tubes Source Type: blogs

I’m Singing in The Events
I’m so excited to share that my chorus, the Collegiate Singers, will be singing on Feb 25, 2014  in the NY Theater Workshop production of David Greig’s play “The Events”, the play that won a First at the 2014 Edinburgh Fringe, and has been touring ever since.  The Events tells the story of Claire—an enthusiastic and engaged female priest who leads a choir in a community setting. Claire experiences something terrible: a young man she vaguely knew turns a gun on those who “aren’t from here” in a misguided attempt to make his mark on society. The Events is not a depict...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - January 22, 2015 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Collegiate Singers Greig New York Theater Workshop The Events Source Type: blogs

Breast Screening Decisions – A Mammogram Decision Aid
I’m proud and excited to introduce you to Breast Screening Decisions, an online Mammogram Decision Aid designed to provide individualized, unbiased information that can help women ages 40-49 decide when to start and how often to have screening mammograms. Breast Screening Decisions (BSD) was created in the wake of the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations that every woman in her 40’s make an individual decision about when to start and how often to have mammograms. Not all medical groups agreed with the USPSTF recommendation, adding to the confusion many women feel ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 15, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Breast Cancer Mammography decide decision how often mammogram screening should I have a mammogram start Source Type: blogs

A Call for Peace & Interfaith Dialog
Four Congregations, One Thanksgiving (from Trinity Wall St Blog) Here’s an event you didn’t see covered in the media because it doesn’t make headlines or stoke the fires of hatred that seem to be flaring across this globe of ours. It happened on Thanksgiving – More than two hundred and fifty meals were served at Interfaith Community Thanksgiving in St. Paul’s Chapel on Thanksgiving Day November 27. The event was a joint effort of Trinity Wall Street; Park 51, an Islamic community center; Tamid: The Downtown Synagogue, which meets in St. Paul’s Chapel; and Lower Manhattan Community Church...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 9, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Calcium – Forget the Supplements. Get it in Your Diet.
In this study, women were given 1000mg a day of calcium plus 400 IU of vitamin D (regardless of vitamin or dietary intake) or a placebo.  Not surprisingly, there was a significant reduction in fractures in women over 70 who took their calcium as prescribed, but at the price of a 17% increase in kidney stones. For every 10,000 women taking calcium, there were two less hip fractures but 5 extra cases of kidney stones. Constipation. Calcium can also cause constipation, so why take more than you need? (If constipation is a problem for you, try taking calcium with magnesium). Interference with absorption of both iron ...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 8, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Women's Health calcium Calcium supplements Dose food sources calcium RDA. Vitamin D Recommendation Source Type: blogs

On Abortion, Jail, Parental Responsibility & Bad Judgement
Jennifer Whalen, a 39 year old mother of three from rural Pennsylvania, is serving a 9-18 month jail sentence for purchasing and dispensing abortion-causing medications to help her teenage daughter abort an unplanned pregnancy. The case is being used as an example of the lengths that women will go to to end a pregnancy when abortion is not immediately and freely available. And perhaps it is. But it’s also an example of just how easy we expect everything to be, and how those expectations are leading us to do things that are really, really stupid. Because make no mistake. What Whalen did was stupid, irresponsible and d...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 25, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Abortion daughter jennifer whalen Judge misoprostol online Pa Pennsylvania pill Prison RU486 Washingtonville Source Type: blogs

Putting Up Irene & Rita’s Fresh Summer Tomato Sauce
Ever since I first saw Mrs Frake putting up pickles and mincemeat in the movie State Fair, I’ve wanted to put up something. As opposed to putting up with something, which basically describes my life. I did once put up a few small jars of blackberry jam with the kids while vacationing on Block Island. We tried to sell the jam at the playground – I think someone bought one jar – then used the rest of the jars pretty much immediately. And that was the end of my putting up. Until this week, when I was faced with forty pounds of South Jersey Roma tomatoes (Thanks Patty!) a few days after meeting blog...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 21, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Canning Recipes Best tomato sauce Canned Tomato sauce Canning tomatoes Garlic Red pepper Toamto sauce with olive oil World's best tomato sauce Source Type: blogs

The Music of The Children Act
Music features prominently in Ian McEwan’s new book The Children Act. The book’s protagonist Fiona Mayes, a family court judge, is also an accomplished pianist, and both she and her husband Jack are lovers of jazz.  Almost every important moment in the book, aside from the first scene and Fiona’s time in the courtroom, occurs while music is being played or listened to. I love how McEwan weaves the musical themes seamlessly throughout the story, informing character, time and place. I listened to the Audible book (a fabulous performance by Linsday Duncan), and found myself wishing that someon...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 19, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Book Reviews BOoks ian mcewan Music Sally Gardens the CHildren act Source Type: blogs

Patient Identifiers, Hospitals & the EHR
Current Joint Commission standards call for the use of two patient identifiers to avoid mixing up patients with the same or similar names. For inpatients, these identifiers are usually the name and the medical record number (MRN). Which is fine if the only place you need to identify the patient is your own hospital. But your hospital’s MRN is meaningless to me and my EHR. So if you send me a copy of my patient’s chart (or her lab result or mammogram report) and all that’s listed on the top of the page is her very common name and your MRN, I have no clue who this patient is. (My EHR gives me a box to check...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 17, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Electronic Medical Records Source Type: blogs

The Not So Scary Truth About HPV
There’s a downside, I think, to educating the public about the link between HPV infection and cervical cancer.  And that’s scaring the bejesus out of every woman who happens to find out she has HPV. It’s not surprising that you’re scared. You see, we want you to know that HPV infection is linked to cervical cancer, and that we have a vaccine against HPV that can prevent cervical cancer. So we’ve been doing our best to get the word out. (With no small bit of help from the HPV test and vaccine manufacturers.) But in our zeal to get you screened and vaccinated, we sort of forgot to tell...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - September 11, 2014 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: HPV HPV & Cervical Cancer abnormal Doctor frightened Gyno High risk pap smear Positive Scared Test Source Type: blogs