Clostridioides difficile infection flourishes with a high-protein, high-fat diet
(American Society for Microbiology) Mice fed a high-fat, high-protein diet were more likely to develop and die from antibiotic-driven Clostridioides difficile infections than mice fed a standard diet. In the same study, published in the journal mSystems, a high-carbohydrate diet was protective against severe C. difficile infection--but the researchers suspect that such a diet could produce healthy, asymptomatic carriers that can spread the pathogen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Fly model offers new approach to unraveling 'difficult' pathogen
(University of California - San Diego) Clostridium difficile, a bacterium known to cause symptoms from diarrhea to life-threatening colon damage, is part of a growing epidemic for the elderly and hospitalized patients. Biologists have now developed models of the common fruit fly to help develop novel therapies to fight the pathogen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 7, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

FDA OKs Fidaxomicin for C difficile in Children FDA OKs Fidaxomicin for C difficile in Children
The macrolide antibacterial is now approved in oral suspension and tablets for treatment of Clostridioides difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) in children aged 6 months and older.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - January 27, 2020 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Gastroenterology News Alert Source Type: news

Researchers identify starting point for designing drugs that cure clostridium difficile
(Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY) A newly published paper in PNAS details a research breakthrough that provides a promising starting point for scientists to create drugs that can cure C. diff -- a virulent health care-associated infection that causes severe diarrhea, nausea, internal bleeding, and potentially death. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 2, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers identify key structure of C. difficle bacteria that could lead to future treatments
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and their colleagues have identified the structure of the most lethal toxin produced by certain strains of Clostridium difficile bacteria, a potentially deadly infection associated with the use of antibiotics. The researchers mapped out the delivery and binding components of the toxin, which could pave the way for new drugs to neutralize it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fecal Microbiota Transplant in Severe C. difficile Infection Fecal Microbiota Transplant in Severe C. difficile Infection
Fecal microbiota transplant has been shown to be very effective in treating recurrent or refractory C. difficile infection. Is it beneficial in severe and fulminant C. difficile infection as well?Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - December 18, 2019 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

New discovery in C. difficile biology could lead to treatments for dangerous infections
(The Mount Sinai Hospital / Mount Sinai School of Medicine) A process called sporulation that helps the dangerous bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) to survive inhospitable conditions and spread is regulated by epigenetics, factors that affect gene expression beyond the DNA genetic code, researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai report. This is the first discovery that epigenetics regulate sporulation in any bacteria. Their research, published November 25th in Nature Microbiology, opens a new window to developing treatments for this devestating infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WHO (World Health Organization) Antibacterial Preclinical Pipeline Review
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 11/2019. This web page provides information, data visualization, and results from the World Health Organization (WHO)'s review of preclinical antibacterial products in the pipeline worldwide. It captures data on 252 antibacterial agents in development, targeting the pathogens on the WHO priority pathogens list, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Clostridium difficile. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antibacterial Products in Clinical Development for Priority Pathogens 2019
Source: World Health Organization (WHO). Published: 11/2019. This web page provides information and data results from the World Health Organization (WHO) analysis of the pipeline of antibacterial products (antibiotics and biologicals) that were in phase I-III of clinical development (as of September 2019) and which had not, at that date, received market authorization for human use anywhere in the world. The analysis matched the products in development against the WHO priority pathogens list (PPL), Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Clostridium difficile. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oral Vancomycin Prevents C Diff Infection in High-Risk Inpatients Oral Vancomycin Prevents C Diff Infection in High-Risk Inpatients
Oral vancomycin prophylaxis can prevent healthcare-facility-onset C. difficile infection (HCFO-CDI) in high-risk patients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy, according to results from an open-label randomized study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - October 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Wellcome Sanger Institute Study Discovers New Strain of C. Difficile That Targets Sugar in Hospital Foods and Resists Standard Disinfectants
Researchers believe new findings about genetic changes in C. difficile are a sign that it is becoming more difficult to eradicate Hospital infection control teams, microbiologists, and clinical laboratory professionals soon may be battling a strain of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) that is even more resistant to disinfectants and other forms of infection control. That’s […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - October 28, 2019 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology anatomic pathology bacteria C. difficile CDC centers for disease control and prevention clinical laboratory Clost Source Type: news

Rx for Doctors: Stop With the Urine Tests
The tests often are positive in people without symptoms, particularly older patients. The result: overtreatment with antibiotics. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paula Span Tags: Tests (Medical) Antibiotics Drug Resistance (Microbial) Hospitals Elderly Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Urinary Tract Bacteria Doctors Clostridium Difficile (Bacterium) Nursing Homes Toronto (Ontario) JAMA Internal Medicine (Journal) U Source Type: news

Bezlotoxumab for preventing recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (terminated appraisal)
NICE is unable to make a recommendation on bezlotoxumab (Zinplava) for preventing recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in adults because Merck Sharp& Dohme did not provide an evidence submission. We will review this decision if the company decides to make a submission. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High-Risk Antibiotic Use Linked to Hospital-Associated C. Difficile
TUESDAY, Sept. 17, 2019 -- Hospital-level high-risk antibiotic use is associated with the risk for hospital-associated (HA) Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), according to a study published online Sept. 16 in Infection Control& Hospital... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - September 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Approaches to the detection of Clostridioides difficile in the healthcare environment
Clostridioides difficile, a spore-forming bacillus, is a major cause of healthcare-associated infection, and can survive for prolonged periods in the inanimate environment. Environmental sampling to detect C. difficile is not routine but may be undertaken as part of outbreak management and during research projects. This literature review considers approaches to the detection of Clostridioides difficile in the healthcare environment. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Infection prevention control and organisational patient safety culture within the context of isolation: study protocol
Healthcare associated infection (HCAI) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In recent years, there have been high profile successes in infection prevention control (IPC), such as the dramatic reductions in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections (which is viewed as one proxy indicator of overall harm) and Clostridium difficile in the UK. Nevertheless, HCAI remains a costly burden to health services, a source of concern to patients and the public and at present, is receiving priority from policy makers as it contributes to the global threat of antimicrobial resistance. (Source: Curr...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Q and A: Fecal transplant for treatment of Clostridium difficile
DEAR MAYO CLINIC: I've had recurring instances of C. diff. that normally is treated with antibiotics. I have read about fecal transplant as a potential treatment. How does this work? ANSWER: Clostridium difficile, also known as Clostridioides difficile and often called C. diff., is a bacterium that causes gastrointestinal symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - September 10, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Clostridioides difficile: diagnosis and treatments
This review summarises the recent data for clinicians to understand and stratify their choice in the diagnosis and treatment of C difficile infection. Current treatment include vancomycin and fidaxomicin; metronidazole is no longer recommended. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could Open-Access Diagnostics Speed Diagnoses?
Today’s molecular diagnostics testing typically involves either manual processing at a reference laboratory or automated processing by preconfigured instruments in near-patient settings, Dr. Jack Regan, CEO and founder of LexaGene, tells MD+DI. Neither approach would be ideal for detecting a highly infectious novel pathogen, he warned. The inability to rapidly configure a near-patient instrument to identify a newly emergent pathogen could result in delayed detection and increase the risk of the disease spreading. Some healthcare experts fear that such delays could lead to a pandemic that could claim thous...
Source: MDDI - August 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Superbug C. difficile is evolving to 'spread in hospitals and thrive on the Western diet' 
Scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine discovered the bacteria Clostridium difficile, which causes diarrhoea, is gradually 'splitting' into two species. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clostridium difficile: guidance, data and analysis
This Guidance Collection covers the characteristics, diagnosis, management, surveillance and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile. It was updated in 2018. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Overtesting and Overtreating: A Problem With C. difficile
Testing for Clostridioides difficile should be done only for patients who have a new onset of unexplained “true diarrhea,” which means three or more loose stools in 24 hours — unformed stools that take the shape of a collection container, Ghinwa Dumyati, MD, said at the AMDA — The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine’s annual conference. (Source: Caring for the Ages)
Source: Caring for the Ages - July 30, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Christine Kilgore Source Type: news

Substantial Costs Attributable to Hospital-Acquired C. Difficile
MONDAY, July 29, 2019 -- Hospital-acquired Clostridioides difficile infection (HA-CDI) is associated with substantial attributable costs, according to a study published online July 25 in Infection Control& Hospital Epidemiology. Jenine R. Leal,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 29, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Association Between State-Mandated Protocolized Sepsis Care and In-hospital Mortality Among Adults With Sepsis
US cohort study (1,012,410 sepsis admissions to 509 hospitals) found, after implementation of regulations for sepsis management in New York State, in-hospital mortality decreased by 3.2%. There were also reductions in hospital length of stay and C difficile infection rates. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds C. difficile still on surgical gowns after disinfectant use
The superbug Clostridium difficile remains on surgical gowns used in hospitals even after being treated with the recommended amount of disinfectant, a new study has warned. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - July 16, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Disinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital Germ
TUESDAY, July 16, 2019 -- Standard decontamination methods may not be enough to stop a dangerous hospital bug, known as Clostridium difficile. In a new study, researchers followed recommended procedures but found that surgical gowns, stainless... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 16, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Diverting Loop Ileostomy Increasingly Used to Manage Fulminant C Difficile Colitis Diverting Loop Ileostomy Increasingly Used to Manage Fulminant C Difficile Colitis
Diverting loop ileostomy (LI) is increasingly favored over total abdominal colectomy (TAC) for the surgical management of patients with fulminant Clostridium difficile colitis, according to a new study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - July 13, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Excess Antibiotic Treatment Duration and Adverse Events in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia: A Multihospital Cohort Study
Retrospective analysis of data from 43 US hospitals suggest 67.8% of patients received excess antibiotic therapy which was not associated with lower rates of any adverse outcomes, including death, readmission, emergency department visit, or Clostridium difficile infection. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

C. difficile resists hospital disinfectant, persists on hospital gowns, stainless steel
(American Society for Microbiology) Surgical gowns and stainless steel remained contaminated with the pathogen Clostridium difficile even after being treated with the recommended disinfectant. The research is published July 12 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Infectious Diseases are Important to Consider in Transplantation Patients?
Discussion Transplantation is not a common problem for primary care physicians but when a child’s disease has progressed to end-stage organ failure, transplantation can be the only treatment available. While the primary care provider usually is not involved in the daily management of patients before, during and after transplantation, they can be involved in many areas. These can include providing appropriate primary and acute care, ordering and obtaining necessary medical tests, medications and equipment, assisting with medical insurance, providing medical history and records to consultants, translating medical infor...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 24, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Updates in the Management of Clostridium difficile for Adults Updates in the Management of Clostridium difficile for Adults
This article reviews recent guideline updates for the treatment of C. difficile infection, which reflect significant changes from previous recommendations.U.S. Pharmacist (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - June 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pharmacist Journal Article Source Type: news

Fecal Transplant Is Linked to a Patient ’s Death, the F.D.A. Warns
The agency said two patients received donated stool that had not been screened for drug-resistant germs, leading it to halt clinical trials until researchers prove proper testing procedures are in place. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Denise Grady Tags: Drug Resistance (Microbial) Antibiotics fecal transplant Clostridium Difficile (Bacterium) E Coli (Bacteria) Food and Drug Administration Digestive Tract your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Best practices of nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis of clostridioides (clostridium)
(American Society for Microbiology) A new review looks at the challenges of testing for Clostridioides (Clostridium) difficile infection (CDI) and recommendations for newer diagnostic tests. Accurate diagnosis of CDI is critical for effective patient management and implementation of infection control measures to prevent transmission. The research is published this week in the Clinical Microbiology Reviews. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sweet! How C. difficile toxin A enters intestinal cells
(Boston Children's Hospital) Clostridiodes difficile infection has become a leading cause of severe, sometimes fatal diarrheal illness, with the bacterium's toxins causing the damage. New work cements our knowledge of how C. diff's two primary toxins, A and B, slip into intestinal cells, the first step toward a possible treatment that doesn't involve antibiotics. This latest study, on toxin A, shows its activity can be blocked with molecules already being developed for various medical indications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 3, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The cost impact of PCT-guided antibiotic stewardship versus usual care for hospitalised patients with suspected sepsis or lower respiratory tract infections in the US: A health economic model analysis
Procalcitonin is a biomarker that supports clinical decision-making on when to initiate and discontinue antibiotic therapy. Several cost (-effectiveness) analyses have been conducted on Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic stewardship, but none mainly based on US originated data. Using a Procalcitonin-algorithm to guide antibiotic use in sepsis and hospitalised lower respiratory tract infection patients is expected to generate cost-savings to the hospital and lower rates of antibiotic resistance and C.difficile infections. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bone and joint infections: are oral antibiotics safe and effective compared with intravenous antibiotics?
A UK multicentre trial including 1,054 adults with acute or chronic bone or joint infections found that using oral antibiotics in the first 6 weeks of treatment did not increase the risk of treatment failure within 1 year, compared with using intravenous antibiotics. People in the intravenous group experienced more intravenous catheter complications and had longer hospital stays than people in the oral group. There was no significant difference between the groups in the incidence of Clostridium difficile diarrhoea or the percentage of participants reporting serious adverse events. The potential for a difference in the long...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Improper Proton Pump Inhibitor Prescriptions Criticized Improper Proton Pump Inhibitor Prescriptions Criticized
Popularity of the stomach- and intestine-protecting drugs has skyrocketed, but related adverse events, like osteoporotic fractures, C difficile infection, and pneumonia, are problematic.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology News Source Type: news

Fecal microbiota transplant found safe and effective in children with C. difficile
(Boston Children's Hospital) Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), or the transfer of stool from a healthy donor to a patient, has been found effective in reversing severe, recurring diarrheal infections from Clostridiodes difficile in adults by restoring a normal microbiome. Now, the largest study to date of FMT in children finds the procedure to be safe and effective in eradicating an infection that is on the rise among children, even those without known risk factors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clostridium difficile infection objectives
These resources set out the objectives for acute trusts and clinical commissioning groups to make continuous improvement in Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) care. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - May 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Everything you need to know about fecal transplants
Fecal transplants are a recent development in the treatment of several conditions, including Clostridium difficile infections. Learn more about this treatment and the emerging research on it here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - May 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Each Added Day of Postop Antibiotics Ups Risk of Kidney Injury, C. Diff Infection Each Added Day of Postop Antibiotics Ups Risk of Kidney Injury, C. Diff Infection
Each additional day of surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis increases the risks of acute kidney injury (AKI) and Clostridium difficile infection and does not lead to reductions in surgical site infections (SSIs), researchers say.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines)
Source: Medscape Orthopaedics Headlines - May 3, 2019 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: General Surgery News Source Type: news

C-Path, CDISC release therapeutic area standard to drive research forward for CDAD
(Critical Path Institute (C-Path)) The Critical Path Institute (C-Path) and CDISC are pleased to announce the release of a global Therapeutic Area Standard, which describes how to use CDISC standards to represent data in research studies pertaining to Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea (CDAD). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DTB Select: Comparison of antibiotics for Clostridium difficile infection
Synopsis and clinical commentary is provided for a meta-analysis of 24 RCTs (n=5,631) that compared 13 drug treatments for Clostridium difficile which found that fidaxomicin was the most effective treatment in providing a long-term cure. Metronidazole was ranked 11th. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fecal Microbiota Transplantation Is Superior to Fidaxomicin for Treatment of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection
RCT (n=64) reports superior clinical& microbiological resolution of infection in 17 FMT patients (71%) vs 8 fidaxomicin patients (33%) and 3 vancomycin patients (19%); P = 0.009 for FMTv vs fidaxomicin; P = 0.001 for FMTv vs vancomycin and P = 0.31 for fidaxomicin vs vancomycin. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More infection cases to be assigned to trusts
The number of cases of C difficile reported by hospitals is expected to increase after changes in how cases are measured. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - April 24, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Revealed: The secret superpower that makes C. difficile so deadly
(University of Virginia Health System) A new discovery about dangerous C. difficile diarrhea has identified a new way that the bacteria -- and possibly others like it -- cause severe disease. C. diff is the most common hospital-acquired infection and estimated to result in 453,000 cases per year, with 29,300 associated deaths. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Feces transplantation: Effective treatment with economic benefits
(Aarhus University) From an average of 37 days in hospital to just 20 days per year. So pronounced is the decrease in hospitalizations for patients who are treated with feces transplantation instead of antibiotics to fight the deadly intestinal disease Clostridium difficile. This is shown by the first study using what is known as 'real world data.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study reveals a connection between the use of NSAIDs and severe C. difficile superbug infections
(Natural News) Antibiotics are known to disrupt the microbial balance in the gut, increasing the risk of getting infected by bacteria such as Clostridium difficile. However, a new study found that even common pain relievers may promote infections caused by C. difficile. C. difficile causes the most common and most dangerous hospital-born infections in the U.S. and around the world. For... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news