Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 24th 2020
In conclusion, taller body height at the entry to adulthood, supposed to be a marker of early-life environment, is associated with lower risk of dementia diagnosis later in life. The association persisted when adjusted for educational level and intelligence test scores in young adulthood, suggesting that height is not just acting as an indicator of cognitive reserve. A Comparison of Biological Age Measurement Approaches https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/a-comparison-of-biological-age-measurement-approaches/ Researchers here assess the performance of a range of approaches to measuring biological...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Gentler Approach to Transplanting Young Hematopoietic Stem Cells into Old Mice Modestly Extends Life Span
Stem cell populations become damaged and dysfunctional with age. Some of this is issues with the stem cells themselves, and some of this results from problem with the signaling environment and function of the stem cell niche. Which of these factors is more important likely varies by stem cell population. Among the best studied of stem cell types, the evidence suggests that muscle stem cells remain capable in old age, but become ever more quiescent, while hematopoietic stem cells become damaged and dysfunctional, unable to perform. Hematopoietic stem cells reside in the bone marrow and are responsible for generating blood a...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 20, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Request for Startups in the Rejuvenation Biotechnology Space, 2020 Edition
This is the latest in a series of yearly posts in which I suggest areas of development for biotech startups I'd like to see actively developed as a part of the longevity industry in the near future. Today, this year, is a good time to be starting a company focused on the production of a novel therapeutic approach to intervening in the aging process. There is a great deal of funding for seed stage investment, and many compelling projects lacking champions, yet to be carried forward from academia into preclinical development. Numerous scientific and industry crossover conferences are now held every year, at which it is possi...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 17, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Investment Source Type: blogs

Transplantation of Young Bone Marrow into Old Mice Produces Systemic Benefits
Researchers here report that transplanting bone marrow from young donor mice into old recipient mice produces a range of benefits, such as improvement in the behavior of macrophage cells. Bone marrow stem cells are responsible for producing blood and immune cells, among other important populations, and this capability is degraded in a number of ways with age. Introducing younger stem cells and their supporting structures is a plausible means to at least partially reverse this process. That said, this sort of approach is unlikely to arrive in human medicine in exactly the same form, given the challenges involved in bone mar...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 14, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Prerequisite Problem in the A & P Course | Episode 61
Host Kevin Patton discusses issues caused by our expectations of anatomy& physiology course prerequisites and answers the question: which prerequisites work best? Recent reports of a bone-marrow recipient with donor DNA in his semen prompts a brief review of what happened. Wi-Fi fields can produce biological effects. What are they and how does Wi-Fi produce them?00:46 | Bone Marrow Genome07:45 | Sponsored by AAA08:27 | Watch Out for Wi-Fi15:19 | Sponsored by ADInstruments16:23 | Prereqs: The Perrennial Conversation25:03 | Sponsored by HAPI25:50 |  Prereqs: The Good News31:55 | Sponsored by HAPS...
Source: The A and P Professor - January 27, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 13th 2020
In this study, we investigated the link between AF and senescence markers through the assessment of protein expression in the tissue lysates of human appendages from patients in AF, including paroxysmal (PAF) or permanent AF (PmAF), and in sinus rhythm (SR). The major findings of the study indicated that the progression of AF is strongly related to the human atrial senescence burden as determined by p53 and p16 expression. The stepwise increase of senescence (p53, p16), prothrombotic (TF), and proremodeling (MMP-9) markers observed in the right atrial appendages of patients in SR, PAF, and PmAF points toward multiple inter...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Towards Replacement of the Aged Hematopoietic Stem Cell Population
Ultimately, the treatment of aging as a medical condition must include ways to either repair or replace damaged stem cell populations. This is a monumental task, given the sizable number of distinct types of stem cell in the body, but there is progress towards replacement via cell therapy in the case of a few of the better studied and characterized stem cell populations. Arguably the most advanced of this work is focused on replacement of hematopoietic stem cells, the stem cell population responsible for generating blood and immune cells. This is fortunate, as the decline of these stem cells has a profound detrimental effe...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Miracle Sister: Stem Cells Saved Her Life
When leukemia took over young Elham’s health in 2014, her parents were devastated. At just 12 years-old, she would experience pain that no child her age should know. Lost and unsure of how to help their daughter, they didn’t realize that after many unsuccessful tries, their miracle would be what was growing inside of Elham’s mom’s belly. After undergoing three unsuccessful rounds of aggressive chemotherapy, Elham’s doctors suggested a second option for treatment: a bone marrow transplant, recommended for its hematopoietic stem cells which are known for their ability to replace diseased blood c...
Source: Cord Blood News - July 16, 2019 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: Cord Blood stem cells Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 10th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 9, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Novel Approach to the Construction of Thymus Organoids
The thymus is a small but important organ; it is where thymocytes originally generated in the bone marrow mature to become T cells of the adaptive immune system. Unfortunately the active tissue of the thymus is slowly replaced by fat over the course of later life, and the supply of new T cells dwindles. This is a significant contributing cause of the age-related decline in immune function. Lacking reinforcements and replacements, the adaptive immune system becomes cluttered with senescent, exhausted, overspecialized, and just plain broken cells. It becomes overly active and inflammatory, but at the same time ineffective. I...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 3, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 13th 2019
In this study, a significant (30%) increase in maximum lifespan of mice was found after nonablative transplantation of 100 million nucleated bone marrow (BM) cells from young donors, initiated at the age that is equivalent to 75 years for humans. Moreover, rejuvenation was accompanied by a high degree of BM chimerism for the nonablative approach. Six months after the transplantation, 28% of recipients' BM cells were of donor origin. The relatively high chimerism efficiency that we found is most likely due to the advanced age of our recipients having a depleted BM pool. In addition to the higher incorporation rates, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 12, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Bone Marrow Transplant from Young to Old Mice Extends Remaining Life Span
In this study, a significant (30%) increase in maximum lifespan of mice was found after nonablative transplantation of 100 million nucleated bone marrow (BM) cells from young donors, initiated at the age that is equivalent to 75 years for humans. Moreover, rejuvenation was accompanied by a high degree of BM chimerism for the nonablative approach. Six months after the transplantation, 28% of recipients' BM cells were of donor origin. The relatively high chimerism efficiency that we found is most likely due to the advanced age of our recipients having a depleted BM pool. In addition to the higher incorporation rates, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Private Health Insurance Organizations Shouldn ’t Dictate Quality of Care
By LYNLY JEANLOUIS Health insurance companies are standing in the way of many patients receiving affordable, quality healthcare. Insurance companies have been denying patient claims for medical care, all while increasing monthly premiums for most Americans. Many of the nation’s largest healthcare payers are private “for-profit” companies that are focused on generating profits through the healthcare system. Through a rigorous approval/denial system, health insurance companies can dictate the type care patients receive. In some cases, this has resulted in patients foregoing life-saving treatments or proc...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christina Liu Tags: Health Policy Health insurance Lynly Jeanlouis private health insurance Quality improvement Quality of care Source Type: blogs

Our Visit to WIRED Health 2019 at London ’s Francis Crick Institute
WIRED Health, now in its sixth year, returned to London’s Francis Crick Institute. The event was opened by Crick Institute director Paul Nurse who introduced the institute and its mission to understand the fundamental biology of human health and disease. The team at the Crick, consisting of 1500 researchers and three Nobel Prize winners, make up Europe’s largest biomedical research facility with an already impressive slate of research, despite being only two years old. The theme of WIRED Heath and the venue’s vision was perfectly summarized by Sir Paul, who closed his address with the charge “f...
Source: Medgadget - April 2, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tom Peach Tags: Exclusive Medicine Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

The London Patient
by Gertrud U. Rey Timothy Ray Brown, also known as the Berlin patient (reviewed in a previous post), was the only person ever to be cured of HIV/AIDS. Until last week. In a report published in the journal Nature, a group of investigators announced the cure of a second HIV-positive patient (designated the “London patient”). In the […] (Source: virology blog)
Source: virology blog - March 14, 2019 Category: Virology Authors: Vincent Racaniello Tags: Basic virology Gertrud Rey Information AIDS bone marrow transplant CCR5 German patient HIV-1 London patient viral virus viruses Source Type: blogs

Bioengineered Gel to Reduce Risk of Bone Marrow Transplants
Bone marrow transplantation is a potentially life-saving treatment for leukemia, multiple myeloma, and HIV. The procedure involves depleting the patient’s immune system, then infusing blood stem cells from a donor, which develop into a new immune system. Unfortunately, during the transplant process, patients are susceptible to disease and infection, making it risky and not recommended in certain cases. Harvard engineers and scientists have developed an injectable, sponge-like gel that may address these challenges. The gel is designed to be injected under the skin at the time of bone marrow transplantation. Over the c...
Source: Medgadget - March 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Genetics Materials Oncology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, February 25th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Transplantation of Young Bone Marrow Improves Brain Function in Old Mice
The immune cells of the brain are somewhat different in character and function from those of the body. They have a greater portfolio of tasks beyond chasing down pathogens, clearing out waste, and assisting in regeneration. For example, the immune cells known as microglia are involved in the maintenance of synaptic connections between neurons. Interestingly, microglia are not produced in the bone marrow by stem cells or progenitor cells, so in the research here in which young bone marrow is transplanted into old mice, one can be fairly sure that any beneficial effects on microglia result from signaling differences on the p...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Shai ’s Story
Shai’s Story is about a mother who fought with her daughter, Shai, through Shai’s battle with rhabdomyosarcoma, a tumorous cancer which developed in her pelvis while she was still in utero. It was diagnosed almost a year after her birth leaving Shai with little option for treatment. Shai’s mother, Frances, spent many months at a time in hospitals with Shai for chemotherapy treatment that was both saving her child’s life and killing her. While treatment helped Shai with one cancer, leaving her family excited for her recovery, it also caused another cancer to develop while she was in remission. Shai h...
Source: Cord Blood News - January 9, 2019 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: babies Cord Blood parents stem cells Source Type: blogs

100 percent satisfaction doesn ’t work in our health system
“I want answers!” My mother was upset over the care for her ill husband. Previously able to converse normally, he was now incoherent and disoriented. The recent recipient of a bone marrow transplant to treat his advanced leukemia, he probably experienced a brain infection because of the immune suppression therapy needed to accept the marrow. The marrow transplant didn’t work. He was sent home from the hospital on hospice care and died soon afterward in the hospice addition of the hospital where I was an intern at the time. My mother insisted that something went wrong, that the hospital was trying to cover...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 21, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cory-michael" rel="tag" > Cory Michael, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

Misdiagnosis: Obamacare Tried to Fix the Wrong Things and Prescribed the Wrong Treatments
By CHARLES SILVER and DAVID A.HYMAN Today THCB is happy to publish a piece reflecting the learnings from Charles Silver and David Hyman’s forthcoming book Overcharged: Why Americans Pay Too Much For Health Care, shortly to be published by the libertarian leaning Cato Institute. In subsequent weeks we’ll feature commentary from the right (Michael Cannon) and from the left (Andy Slavitt) about the book and its proposals. For now please give your views in the comments–Matthew Holt There are many reasons why the United States is “the most expensive place in the world to get sick.” In Par...
Source: The Health Care Blog - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Economics OP-ED Cato Institute Charles Silver David A. Hyman Obamacare Overcharged Source Type: blogs

Immunosenescence and Neurodegeneration
How greatly does the onset of dementia depend on the age-related decline of the immune system? The most evident contributions to neurodegeneration are vascular aging and the accumulation of protein aggregates such as amyloid-β, tau, and α-synuclein. These are only indirectly connected to the aging of the immune system, in the sense that immune function influences in some way near all aspects of tissue function, and its progressive failure tends to make everything at least a little less functional. Chronic inflammation appears to play a direct and important role in the progression of most neurodegenerative condit...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 8, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Real World Evidence (RWE) vs Randomized Control Trials (RCT): The Battle For the Future of Medicine
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Case For Real World Evidence (RWE)
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD Randomized control trials – RCTs – rose to prominence in the twentieth century as physicians and regulators sought to evaluate rigorously the performance of new medical therapies; by century’s end, RCTs had become, as medical historian Laura Bothwell has noted, “the gold standard of medical knowledge,” occupying the top position of the “methodologic heirarch[y].” The value of RCTs lies in the random, generally blinded, allocation of patients to treatment or control group, an approach that when properly executed minimizes confounders (based on the presumption t...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

New treatment through stem cell transplant for Sickle cell anemia
Sickle cell anemia is a form of anemia in which there aren’t enough healthy red blood cells to carry enough oxygen throughout your body. General symptoms include fatigue and joint pain with periods of intense pain that can last either hours or weeks. Revee Agyepong, a 17-year-old from Edmonton, Canada, suffered from sickle cell anemia with symptoms of chronic bone and joint pain, irregular heartbeat, kidney stones and shortness of breath. “I thought that everyone would go out for recess and play, then come back with a terrible headache and body pain, couldn’t breathe … eventually I&n...
Source: Cord Blood News - April 30, 2018 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: blood disorder Cord Blood medical research stem cells Source Type: blogs

Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 228
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Just when you thought your brain could unwind on a Friday, you realise that it would rather be challenged with some good old fashioned medical trivia FFFF…introducing Funtabulously Frivolous Friday Five 228. Question 1 Who is the Berlin patient? + Reveal the Funtabulous Answer expand(document.getElementById('ddet528624629'));expand(document.getElementById('ddetlink528624629')) Timothy Ray Brown Arguably the first person to be cured of HIV. There are other...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - March 2, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Neil Long Tags: Frivolous Friday Five Berlin patient bullet virus HIV PCP pneumocystis carinii Pneumocystis jiroveci Queen Square Hammer rabies Reflex hammer reflexes Taylor Hammer The Ramones Timothy Ray Brown Troemner hammer Source Type: blogs

Further Investigation of the Role of Osteopontin in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Aging
The Hematopoietic stem cell population resident in bone marrow is responsible for generating blood cells and immune cells. Like all stem cell populations, their activity alters and declines with aging. This is one of the causes of the progressive disarray of the immune system in older individuals. If we want to rejuvenate the immune system, then restoring the youthful activity of hematopoietic stem cells is one of the items on the to-do list, alongside regrowth of the thymus, and clearing out the accumulation of exhausted, senescent, and misconfigured immune cells. The protein osteopontin appears to have a sizable r...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 16, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 8th 2018
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 7, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Vesicles from Young Cells Reverse Measures of Aging in Old Stem Cells
Much of the constant signaling that takes place between cells is carried via microvesicles and exosomes, membrane-bound packages of molecules. Researchers are finding that the contents of vesicles change in characteristic ways with advancing age, one of the many cellular reactions to rising levels of molecular damage and environmental stress. Some of these changes might be useful as a marker of cellular senescence, one of the more important changes in cell state associated with age. It should also be possible to use suitably formed vesicles to adjust cell behavior in situ, such as to spur greater regeneration. Perhaps thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 3, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

What Know and What We Think
ROBERT McNUTT, MD What matters is what we know, not what we think In the late 1980’s I cared for a pregnant woman with breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in pregnancy, but uncommon in number, occurring in about 1 in 3000 pregnancies. It is a compounded emotional treating experience for sure, and at that time uncertainty in how to treat was the norm. The woman had a mastectomy but did not take chemotherapy based on concern for her baby. Three months after her delivery, now getting chemotherapy for her aggressive breast cancer, the woman asked me to consider treating her newborn child with “mi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

What We Know and What We Think
ROBERT McNUTT, MD What matters is what we know, not what we think In the late 1980’s I cared for a pregnant woman with breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in pregnancy, but uncommon in number, occurring in about 1 in 3000 pregnancies. It is a compounded emotional treating experience for sure, and at that time uncertainty in how to treat was the norm. The woman had a mastectomy but did not take chemotherapy based on concern for her baby. Three months after her delivery, now getting chemotherapy for her aggressive breast cancer, the woman asked me to consider treating her newborn child with “mi...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

The Implementer ’ s Dilemma
By DAVID SHAYWITZ, MD One word: implementation. Increasingly, I’m convinced that the underappreciated challenges of implementation describe the ever-expanding gap between the promise of emerging technologies (sensors, AI) and their comparatively limited use in clinical care and pharmaceutical research. (Updated disclosure: I am now a VC, associated with a pharma company; views expressed, as always, are my own.) Technology Promises Disruption Of Healthcare… Let’s start with some context. Healthcare, it is universally agreed, is “broken,” and in particular, many of the advances and conveniences...
Source: The Health Care Blog - December 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Daimler Benz AG David Shaywitz Innovation Source Type: blogs

One Last Story on How Life Sucks After Breast Cancer
Okay, maybe I have been in a rut because I have been stuck at home after knee surgery because I can't drive. Or maybe because I have a cold that I am obsessing on crappy lives after cancer. Or maybe the internet gods had their stars align and all these stories ended up on my laptop in the same time period. But I hope this will be the last one for a while.Here's the story of a young woman who lost both her husband and her sister because of her lengthy cancer treatment." “The reality is that probably four out of seven days I’m in bed,” explains the 39-year-old, who lives with her mother at Bundall.&ldq...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - November 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: being a patient breast cancer bonds breast cancer treatment stress Source Type: blogs

A first-hand account of single-payer health care
I am sitting in my hospital room in a bone marrow transplant unit in a European city. I am a patient who has recently received a stem cell transplant. I am U.S. citizen, but I am a resident of a country with a single-payer health system. The insurance system here covers 85 percent of the population. And participation is mandatory, although high earners can opt out by purchasing private insurance. Citizens and working residents pay a tax of about 15 percent of their earnings for their government-financed health care coverage. The insurance is administered by one of several non-profit organization that differ very little in ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - September 29, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/darrel-moellendorf" rel="tag" > Darrel Moellendorf < /a > Tags: Patient Oncology/Hematology Washington Watch Source Type: blogs

What Does an Ideal Healthcare System Look Like?
By ASHISH JHA, MD Austin Frakt and Aaron Carroll recently approached me about a New York Times UpShot piece aiming to rank eight healthcare systems they had chosen: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Singapore, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. This forced me to think about a pretty fundamental question: what do we want from a healthcare system? I would argue that most people want a healthcare system where they can get timely access to high quality, affordable care and one that also promotes innovation of new tests and treatments. But underlying these sentiments are a lot of important issues that nee...
Source: The Health Care Blog - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 21st 2017
This study didn't measure whether receiving the cardiosphere-derived cells extended lifespans, so we have a lot more work to do. We have much to study, including whether CDCs need to come from a young donor to have the same rejuvenating effects and whether the extracellular vesicles are able to reproduce all the rejuvenating effects we detect with CDCs." Cardiac and systemic rejuvenation after cardiosphere-derived cell therapy in senescent rats Cardiosphere-derived cell (CDC) therapy has exhibited several favourable effects on heart structure and function in humans and in preclinical models; however,...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 20, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Cell Banking for Future Autologous Cell Therapies Seems Pointless
I'll start here by pointing out the most useful application for cryopreservation of cells and tissues: it greatly reduces the cost of logistics in transplant medicine. When you need to coordinate people and cells and places on timescales of a few days, weeks, or months, the ability to confidently put the cells into safe storage for short period of time changes the whole tenor of the affair. Just look at the organ transplant field, for example, which is defined by the fact that this storage cannot yet be achieved. Organ transplantation is enormously expensive not just because the donor pool is limited, but also because orga...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs

Following up on a very old case: Abraham Cherrix is alive and well because he finally rejected alternative medicine
Although I haven’t discussed it here in depth, the case of Abraham Cherrix is an instructive example. Eleven years ago, he and his parents chose quackery over science-based medicine to treat his cancer. He’s alive now because he finally realized the error of his decision and underwent chemotherapy and a bone marrow transplant. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - August 7, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Quackery Abraham Cherrix chemotherapy Hodgkin's lymphoma Hoxsey therapy Source Type: blogs

Outbreaks of Non-tuberculous Mycobacterium Infection in the United States
To date, 114 known outbreaks of human infection by non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been associated with medical / other invasive procedures.  37 of these (32%) have reported from the United States.  The following chronology is abstracted from the Gideon e-book series. [1]   Primary references are available from the author.  1987     17 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae otitis media in Louisiana caused by contaminated water used by an ENT practice  1988    8 cases of Mycobacterium chelonae infection associated with a contaminated jet injector used in a Podiatry of...
Source: GIDEON blog - June 26, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Dr. Stephen Berger Tags: General Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 19th 2017
This study is the first to show that downregulation of PAPP-A expression in adult mice can significantly extend life span. Importantly, this beneficial longevity phenotype is distinct from the dwarfism of long-lived PAPP-A KO, Ames dwarf, Snell dwarf and growth hormone receptor (GHR) KO mice with germ-line mutations. Thus, downregulation of PAPP-A expression joins other treatment regimens, such as resveratrol, rapamycin and dietary restriction, which can extend life span when started in mice as adults. In a recent study, inducible knockdown of the GHR in young adult female mice increased maximal, but not median, lif...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 18, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Revisiting Whole Body Induced Cell Turnover as a Therapeutic Strategy
Last year some of the researchers associated with the Biogerontology Research Foundation proposed a class of therapy they call whole body induced cell turnover. I noticed a new paper and publicity materials on this topic today. In essence the goal is to augment the normal processes of cell turnover with therapies that remove and replace more cells than would normally be the case, thus clearing out the damage in those cells along the way. Since aging is caused by cell and tissue damage, in the ideal case this approach should act as a form of rejuvenation therapy. Obviously there are some limits here, such as areas of the br...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 16, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Tomorrow, we may fail you: Vignettes of pre-existing conditions
Today, I cleaned the laceration above your eye from where he punched you with a closed fist. As I was stitching up the gaping wound with two layers of sutures, I told you that the scar would fade into the line of your eyebrow. I helped you apply your foundation on your neck to cover the bruising from where he strangled you. I monitored you for any swelling of your airway. I wrote down the names of the local battered women’s shelters and hotlines and slipped the paper in your shoe. I offered to call the police for you no fewer than ten times. I told you how I feared the next time you would not be discharged home. Toda...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 13, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/amanda-guarniere" rel="tag" > Amanda Guarniere, CRNP < /a > Tags: Conditions Emergency Source Type: blogs

Physicians can choose to nurture their human side
A keynote address to Gold Humanism Honor Society Induction Ceremony, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. As an intern, I was assigned to 9 weeks over the year on the bone marrow transplant inpatient unit.  It was medically fascinating but emotionally draining and anxiety provoking.  I began to get nauseated going to work because I was having such a hard time with the rotation.  As I sank deeper into anxiety and self-doubt as patient after patient died or had terrible complications, I met a patient who forever changed my attitude towards humanism in medicine, and I&rs...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - April 13, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/gretchen-diemer" rel="tag" > Gretchen Diemer, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary care Source Type: blogs

Hobson ’ s Wrong Answer
By JIM PURCELL Thomas Hobson was his name, a licensed carrier of passengers, letters, and parcels between Cambridge and London in the years surrounding 1600. He kept horses for such purpose, and rented them when he wasn’t using them. Naturally, the students all wanted the best horses, and as a result, Mr. Hobson’s better mounts became badly overworked. To remedy this situation, he began a strict rotation system, giving each customer the choice of taking the horse nearest the stable door or none at all. This rule became known as Hobson’s Choice, and soon people were using that term to mean “no choic...
Source: The Health Care Blog - April 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: John Irvine Tags: Uncategorized Biogen Boston Globe Hobson Source Type: blogs

Did cannabis oil save Deryn Blackwell ’ s life?
In a forthcoming book The Boy in 7 Billion, Callie Blackwell claims that cannabis oil, which she had started giving her son Deryn to relieve his symptoms during a bone marrow transplant for two cancers, actually saved his life when the bone marrow transplant appeared to be failing. Unfortunately, her story appears to be another testimonial that confuses correlation with causation. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 3, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking bone marrow transplant Callie Blackwell cannabis cannabis oil Deryn Blackwell Karen Hockney Source Type: blogs

How Do We Protect Patients From False Promises In Right-To-Try Laws?
My sister Gale had exhausted every option. Metastatic cancer raged through her body, defeating all conventional treatments. She faced a final decision: succumb to the disease, or wage one last battle with an experimental bone marrow transplant known to kill 20 percent of patients. Gale chose to fight, opting to use the unproven therapy at a time when institutional review boards and scientific peer review regulated experimental therapies rather than the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Now, three decades later, the FDA has an expanded access policy, also known as “compassionate use,” that seeks to ensure the ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - March 14, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Ellen Sigal Tags: End of Life & Serious Illness Quality Compassionate Use experimental therapies right to try terminal illness Source Type: blogs

Age-Related Failure of Autophagy Contributes to Stem Cell Decline
Researchers here provide evidence that points to declining autophagy as a cause of the faltering stem cell activity that accompanies aging. Autophagy is an important process of cellular maintenance, a part of recycling damaged structures and proteins within cells. Increased levels of autophagy are a feature of numerous methods of modestly slowing aging demonstrated in mice and other laboratory species. Unfortunately autophagy fails with age; like all systems it is impacted by the accumulation of molecular damage, and in particular in this case, by the growing amounts of metabolic waste making up lipofuscin, a mix of variou...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 6, 2017 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, September 5th 2016
This study is a good example of the degree to which the choice to remain active in later life makes a difference. That implies a range of other choices over the decades in order to raise the odds that you can in fact choose to remain active when older, such as avoiding weight gain. Moderate physical activity is associated with a greater than 50% reduction in cardiovascular death in over-65s. The 12 year study in nearly 2500 adults aged 65 to 74 years found that moderate physical activity reduced the risk of an acute cardiovascular event by more than 30%. High levels of physical activity led to greater risk reducti...
Source: Fight Aging! - September 4, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Potential Use of Cell Therapies to Treat Immunosenescence
Immunosenescence is the name given to the decline of immune system effectiveness with aging, a large component of the frailty that arises in later life. This decline is partially a result of a failing supply of new immune cells, and partially a result of a growing misconfiguration of the immune system as a whole, driven by life-long exposure to infections. On this second front, persistent infection by herpesviruses such as cytomegalovirus appears to be particularly problematic, the cause of large fractions of the immune cell population in an old individual becoming specialized and unable to react to new threats. This open ...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 30, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

A Potential Way to Speed the Recovery Phase of an Immune System Reboot
There is great potential in the destruction and recreation of the immune system: the removal of all immune cells and replacement with new cells. This is an approach capable of curing autoimmune conditions, but perhaps more importantly it might also be used to clear out much of the dysfunction of the aged immune system. Immune system decline is an important component of the frailty of aging, and it speeds other aspects of the aging process through inflammation and a growing failure to monitor and destroy potentially harmful cells, such as those that become senescent. Just recently researchers made real progress on the immun...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 26, 2016 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs