Surprise! Surprise! (Well, actually, no.) Acupuncture does not work for in vitro fertilization
Australian researchers have carried out another randomized clinical trial on acupuncture for in vitro fertilization. Unsurprisingly, it's completely negative. Also unsurprisingly, acupuncturists are not happy and are furiously making excuses. The post Surprise! Surprise! (Well, actually, no.) Acupuncture does not work for in vitro fertilization appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 17, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture featured in vitro fertilziation infertility ivf traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

PLOS ONE publishes a howler of a bad acupuncture network meta-analysis
Meta-analyses can sometimes suffer from the “GIGO problem” (garbage in, garbage out). The publication of a “crappy” acupuncture “network meta-analysis” for acupuncture and chronic constipation illustrates the GIGO problem on steroids a.nd reveals a problem with peer review at PLOS ONE, where it was published The post PLOS ONE publishes a howler of a bad acupuncture network meta-analysis appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 14, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Clinical trials Integrative medicine Quackery acupuncture electroacupunture featured meta-analysis PLoS ONE Source Type: blogs

How to Inspire Your Writing (and Your Life) Every Day
There are various clever quotes about why inspiration is unnecessary for writing. After all, writing is work. After all, plumbers don’t need to be inspired to do their jobs; they just do their jobs. The same goes for electricians, attorneys, and doctors. And if we wait to write until we’re hit by some magical wand of inspiration, we might never start in the first place. This is true. Being able to work whether you feel inspired or not is important. It’s a great skill. And yet inspiration is critical, too. In a piece entitled “Why Inspiration Matters,” Scott Barry Kaufman writes, “Inspira...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Success & Achievement aesthetics Motivation writing Source Type: blogs

House E & C Subcommittee on Health Reviews Dozens of Opioid Bills
Conclusion Chairman Burgess indicated that he is still deciding whether to combine numerous opioid-related bills into a single legislative package or try to move the bills through committee individually. Chairman Burgess noted that it is possible to put all of the legislation together in one package, but added that part of him “wants to consider them as individual bills so that, as we go through at least the subcommittee markup and the full committee markup, there will be ample opportunity for people’s ideas to be heard.”         (Source: Policy and Medicine)
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

O ’NA HealthCare: A new healthcare insurance option?
I was recently invited to speak at David Wolfe’s Longevity NOW conference in Anaheim, California, where I gave a talk entitled “Germs, Muscle, and Pac-Man: New Strategies for Turning the Clock Back 10 or 20 Years” detailing some new strategies for maintaining youthfulness and vigor. (It was a longevity conference, after all. I shall be posting a similar talk on our Undoctored Inner Circle website in the next few days.) Of the 40-some vendor booths that were part of the conference, there was one that caught my eye: O’NA HealthCare. They claim to provide coverage for functional medicine care, integrat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 11, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle health insurance healthcare low-cost Source Type: blogs

The previously undiscovered organ known as the “ interstitium ” revisited: The Deepak Chopra connection
Yesterday, Orac discussed a widely hyped new scientific finding of a "new organ" known as the interstitium, in which the authors of the study suggested that their findings might "explain" acupuncture. Today, Orac realizes that the woo goes much, much deeper. Deepak Chopra, anyone? The post The previously undiscovered organ known as the “interstitium” revisited: The Deepak Chopra connection appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 4, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Physics Quackery Religion Science Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Deepak Chopra featured interstitium Neil Theise Source Type: blogs

The “ interstitium ” : Interesting science versus PR spin and pseudoscience
Last week, the media were awash with reports of the "interstitium," which was dramatically described as a hitherto undiscovered "organ," a narrative that was definitely a triumph of PR over science that went beyond what even the investigators claimed in their paper. Worse, the investigators themselves even speculated that their discovery could "explain" acupuncture and other kinds of alternative medicine, thus providing an opening for quacks to run wild with their discovery, something I expect to see very soon. The post The “interstitium”: Interesting science versus PR spin and pse...
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Biology Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Science acupressure acupuncture collagen complementary and alternative mediciner featured interstitium lymphatic system Neil Theise quackery Rebecca Wel Source Type: blogs

I ’m a doctor but I didn’t mean to be a drug pusher
I never wanted to be a drug pusher. A career in medicine was the opposite — healing in place of harming. However, I knew something was wrong when a detective asked to speak to me about one of my patients. My patient, addicted to Vicodin, had committed several acts of fraud and theft in desperate attempt to satisfy her needs. Her arrest was the final step in a long, slow unraveling of a happy and productive life. I was not just a witness to this painful process; I was an active participant. As her primary care physician, I helped fuel her addiction and shared in the responsibility. When the history of the opiate epide...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kevin-haggerty" rel="tag" > Kevin Haggerty, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Bee venom acupuncture: Deadly quackery that can kill
Bee venom acupuncture is a form of apitherapy (treatment with bee products, such as venom, honey, or pollen) in which bee venom is injected along acupuncture points, often by actual bees. It also recently resulted in the death of a woman from anaphylactic shock. Basically, the use of bee venom acupuncture cannot be justified because it has no proven benefits and is potentially deadly. The post Bee venom acupuncture: Deadly quackery that can kill appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - March 23, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Popular culture Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture anaphylactic shock apitherapy bee pollen bee venom bee venom acupuncture featured Goop Gwyneth Paltrow Source Type: blogs

What ’ s more quackademic medicine than Harvard ’ s acupuncture course? Maybe Duke ’ s reflexology course!
Quackery has thoroughly infiltrated medical academia in the form of "integrative medicine." So what's worse than Harvard offering an acupuncture course? It might be Duke offering a reflexology and reiki course. The post What’s more quackademic medicine than Harvard’s acupuncture course? Maybe Duke’s reflexology course! appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 23, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Duke Integrative Medicine Duke University featured Harvard University quackademic medicine reflexology Source Type: blogs

Quackademic medicine versus being “ science-based ”
A couple of weeks ago, I was interviewed by the a reporter from the Georgetown student newsletter about its integrative medicine program. It got me to thinking how delusion that one’s work is science-based can lead to collaborations with New Age “quantum” mystics like Deepak Chopra. "Integrative medicine" doctors engaging in what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine all claim to be "evidence-based" or "science-based." The words apparently do not mean what integrative medicine academics think they mean. The post Quackademic medicine versus being “science-based&rdqu...
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 19, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture Aviad Haramati Chopra Center Deepak Chopra featured Georgetown University Hakima Amri homeopathy Source Type: blogs

House Holds Hearing on Opioid Crisis
Discussion at the hearing largely focused on the desire to pass bipartisan legislation to address the opioid crisis as well as to determine best practices to identify over-prescribers and reduce instances of fraud. Opening Statements Chairwoman Lynn Jenkins opened the hearing by highlighting statistics regarding rising opioid related overdose death rates in her home state of Kansas. She went on to state that the “immense cost opioids impose on society” have caused a loss of productivity and put undue burden on the U.S. economic system. To lessen this burden, Jenkins stressed the importance to provide Medicare...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Expert advice on how to quit smoking
Okay, everyone knows smoking is bad for you, the number one cause of preventable death in the US and the world, a direct cause of lung and heart disease and cancer… et cetera. So let’s get right down to the nitty-gritty: quitting smoking is tough. What can people do to quit? To answer this question, I spoke with my colleague Nancy Rigotti, MD. Dr. Rigotti is director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Tobacco Research and Treatment Center. She has extensively researched nicotine and tobacco, evaluated public policies on tobacco, contributed to US Surgeon General’s Reports, and authored clinical guidel...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs

The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health: Exaggerating the evidence for acupuncture to make it appear to be more than an elaborate placebo
The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health is a group dedicated to promoting "integrative medicine" in medical academia that has, unfortunately, been very successful over the last two decades. Recently, it published a report that promotes acupuncture as a tool to combat the opioid epidemic Let's just put it this way. The ACIMH exaggerates the evidence rather obviously. The post The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health: Exaggerating the evidence for acupuncture to make it appear to be more than an elaborate placebo appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health acupuncture Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Source Type: blogs

Quackademic medicine triumphant (yet again): A defense of acupuncture on the Harvard Health Blog that misses the point
If you want yet another piece of evidence that quackademic medicine, where once science-based medical schools embrace quackery, is triumphant, is needed, look no further than a fallacy-filled blog post on the Harvard Health Blog in defense of acupuncture. The post Quackademic medicine triumphant (yet again): A defense of acupuncture on the Harvard Health Blog that misses the point appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture acupuncture points Carolyn Bernstein featured Harvard Health Blog Harvard Medical School Helene Langevin quackademic medicine Source Type: blogs

Blood Vessel on a Chip to Study Angiogenesis and Test Anti-Cancer Drugs
Scientists at the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, have developed a blood vessel on a chip. The device makes it simpler to study angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel growth. In addition, the technology could aid researchers in developing new anti-cancer drugs that act by inhibiting angiogenesis in tumors. Angiogenesis is a therapeutic target for some anti-cancer drugs. Inhibiting blood vessel formation in tumors can slow their growth and is a promising therapeutic strategy. However, testing new angiogenesis-inhibiting drugs can be a challenge, and animal models are frequently required. &ld...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Genetics Medicine Source Type: blogs

More on the funding of acupuncture quackery by Medicaid
A few weeks ago, I described how acupuncture advocates appeared to have successfully snookered the Ohio Medicaid program into funding the quackery that is acupuncture for Medicaid recipients. Now, they're poised to go beyond Ohio The post More on the funding of acupuncture quackery by Medicaid appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 29, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Integrative medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture featured Medicaid Ohio Oregon Vermont Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture for headache
It is easy to ridicule a 2000-year-old treatment that can seem closer to magic than to science. Indeed, from the 1970s to around 2005, the skeptic’s point of view was understandable, because the scientific evidence to show that acupuncture worked, and why, was weak, and clinical trials were small and of poor quality. But things have changed since then. A lot. Thanks to the development of valid placebo controls (for example, a retractable “sham” device that looks like an acupuncture needle but does not penetrate the skin), and the publication of several large and well-designed clinical trials in the last d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Helene Langevin, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

More “ auricular ” acupuncture: Our veterans deserve science-based medicine, not quackery
Over the last several years, the Veterans Health Administration has been increasing the amount of quackery being offered in VA hospitals and clinics. This time around, it's auricular acupuncture. The post More “auricular” acupuncture: Our veterans deserve science-based medicine, not quackery appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 11, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture auricular acupuncture battlefield acupuncture featured Veterans Administration Veterans Health Administration Source Type: blogs

The next frontier in “ integrative medicine ” : Getting Medicaid to fund quackery
Naturopaths are not the only relentless quacks seeking to bend government to legitimize their quackery. Acupuncturists are now working to get Medicaid to fund acupuncture services. They are succeeding. The post The next frontier in “integrative medicine”: Getting Medicaid to fund quackery appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Politics Popular culture Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture featured Jared West John Kasich Medicaid Ohio Vermont Source Type: blogs

How to treat dry eyes
How common are dye eyes?The prevalence of dry eyes has been estimated to be 5-30% percent in persons aged 50 years and older, 7% of US adult population has been diagnosed with dry eye disease. The prevalence increases with age (2.7% in those 18 to 34 years old vs. 19% in those aged 75 years and older). Prevalence is higher in women than men (9% versus 4%).What are the risk factors for dry eye disease?- Advanced age- Female gender- Hormonal changes (primarily due to decreased androgens)- Systemic diseases (eg, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson disease)- Contact lens wear- Systemic medications (antihistamines, anticholinergi...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - January 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: noreply at blogger.com (Ves Dimov) Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Acupressure App – Does it really alleviate menstrual cramps?
The media is abuzz over a study reporting that use of a cell phone app to train women in self-acupressure is effective as pain medication for treating menstrual cramps. The Android app is called AKUD and is written in German, so unless du sprichst Deutch, it won’t do you much good. But let’s ignore that for now. Here’s the study intervention: The study intervention Participants received a menstrual tracking App that included instructions on acupressure for cramp relief. They also got one-on-one instruction on the location of specific acupressure points and use of acupressure using drawings and v...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 12, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Alternative Medicine Women's Health app cell phone menstrual cramps Source Type: blogs

What to do for stubborn low back pain
A while back, I covered the updated evidence-based treatment guidelines for acute (less than four weeks) and subacute (less than twelve weeks) low back pain. I promised a post on chronic (more than twelve weeks) back pain. Well, as I write this, I am suffering from a recurrence of my own low back pain, which radiates down my right leg at times. This has been literally and figuratively a pain in my rear end, for years. Being a doctor who practices what I preach, I am putting all the advice I dispense to good use. First, look for possible triggers This fall, I had gotten away from my regular core-strengthening routine (night...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Lowering the bar for traditional Chinese medicine for ideology and profit
In the 1950s, Chairman Mao Zedong began the "integration" of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) into real medicine. Last year, the Chinese government passed a bill to promote the sale of TCM products. This. year, we see what that means. The post Lowering the bar for traditional Chinese medicine for ideology and profit appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - December 7, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Politics Quackery acupuncture Chairman Mao China featured Mao Zedong traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Don ’t let the opioid crisis affect the treatment course for your patients
Mrs. Smith is an 81-year-old female. She worked a long time doing very physical work and is now on a fixed income and comes to my office with chronic pain. X-rays show she has degenerative arthritis in her hips, knees and lumbar spine. She has taken Norco twice a day for years and has been able to be very stable on this. She has always been compliant with her medications. She has not lost them or had them stolen. She lives with her husband, and they use a safe where they keep their medications. The patient has done well with acupuncture and massage in the past but is not able to afford these, and her insurance doesn’...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/t-j-matsumoto" rel="tag" > T.J. Matsumoto, PA-C < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

First Electronic Device for Opioid Withdrawal Therapy Approved by FDA
The FDA has given a regulatory green light to the first device that reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms. The NSS-2 Bridge from Innovative Health Solutions, a Versailles, Indiana firm, is stuck to the skin behind the ear and relies on four electrodes that are attached around the ear. The electrodes are used to deliver electric current to a set of occipital and cranial nerves (V, VII, IX, and X), hopefully helping addicts to avoid agitation, insomnia, and other symptoms of kicking opioids. The same device was approved by the FDA three years ago for use in acupuncture and the current approval went under the de novo review...
Source: Medgadget - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Neurology Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The cost of chronic pain
There is a saying that being poor is expensive. From personal experience, I know this to be true. But I think it also needs to be said that, especially in the United States, chronic illness can be quite expensive as well. In fact, there is a huge intersection between poverty and disability/illness. As with many intersections, it is a chicken-or-egg scenario, difficult to determine which is begetting which. But one thing is clear: there are often blind spots about these expenses in the medical community and how they can impact chronically ill people already struggling with finances. Recently I attended a seminar on the topi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Health Health care Health policy Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Nanoporous Needles May Significantly Boost Effectiveness of Acupuncture
Acupuncture still has a way to go to prove itself useful in many clinical applications, but its effectiveness may be significantly boosted by improving the needles that are used. A study in journal Nature Scientific Reports by researchers at DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea) introduces acupuncture needles that have minuscule holes throughout them that are from nanometer to micrometer in scale. The new needles have a significantly greater surface area, about ten times that common needles of the same size would have. The researchers, in a study on lab rats with colorectal ca...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Conference Review: 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium - Day 1
by Christian Sinclair (@ctsinclair)It is a testament to the growth and mainstream acceptance of palliative care, that there is a sub-sub-specialty two-day conference like the#PallOnc conference held in San Diego this past weekend. If you have not heard of this meeting yet, and the majority of your work in that intersection between oncology and palliative care, I would highly recommend considering it in the future. This is the 4th consecutive year the meeting has been held, and I applaud the commitment of the four co-sponsoring organizations (AAHPM, ASCO, ASTRO and MASCC). Kristina Newport and Shanthi Sivendranreviewed this...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 30, 2017 Category: Palliative Care Tags: conference reviews oncology palliative sinclair Source Type: blogs

Alternative medicine for cancer: Greater scrutiny is needed
As the calendar turns to early October, I’m reminded that this is the 6th anniversary of Steve Jobs’ death. At the time of his death, I was a medical student and my wife had just completed six months of chemotherapy. I was surprised to learn that Jobs had died from complications of cancer and shocked to discover that he had initially refused conventional cancer treatment in favor of alternative medicines. At first, I found it difficult to understand how someone with the intellectual and financial resources of Steve Jobs could make such a decision — but I was quickly reminded of the massive amounts of misi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skyler-johnson" rel="tag" > Skyler Johnson, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Endocrinology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

A blog post on blog posts: Fact, fiction, and friction
A blog by definition is a regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or group, and is written in an informal or conversational style. As with any conversation, there is usually a blend of fact and opinion. In the case of a blog on medical topics, frequently the opinions are those of experts, and it is not uncommon for such opinions to lead to healthy debate. Fake news or skewed views? We make many decisions on the basis of research studies, and this is particularly the case in medicine. The non-medical media often does a good job of sensationalizing research in ways that are at times excessiv...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

3 things parents should know about complementary and alternative medicine
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire More and more, I have families in my practice who are trying out treatments and therapies I didn’t prescribe. Most of the time, it’s absolutely fine. Other times, it’s not. “Complementary and alternative medicine” is a broad term that refers to treatments that are not generally part of traditional Western medicine. It includes things like herbal remedies, dietary supplements or alternative diets, acupuncture, acupressure, homeopathy, Chinese remedies, Reiki, or hypnosis. It also includes things like yoga or meditation — and chiropractic medicine. Many of th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Complementary and alternative medicine Parenting Source Type: blogs

A new nomenclature for auricular acupuncture: The ultimate in Tooth Fairy science
Tooth Fairy science is the study of a phenomenon before having actually demonstrated that the phenomenon actually exists. I can't think of a better example than trying to construct an elaborate mapping system of body parts and organs to the surface of the external ear for purposes of sticking needles in them to heal and relieve pain (auricular acupuncture). Yet that's what's just been published. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - August 25, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture auricular acupuncture homunculus Source Type: blogs

Stopping Epidemics At The Source: Applying Lessons From Cholera To The Opioid Crisis
On September 8, 1854, acting on the advice of Dr. John Snow, London municipal authorities removed the pump handle from the Broad Street well in an effort to halt a major outbreak of cholera. Although an anesthesiologist by profession, Snow had methodically mapped the homes of new cases of cholera. He found that many clustered around the Broad Street pump. Snow’s findings, still regarded as a classic example of epidemiology, established the principle: “that the most important information to have about any communicable disease is its mode of communication.” Dr. Snow did not establish the biologic mechanism ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 4, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Chester Buckenmaier III and Eric Schoomaker Tags: Featured Public Health Quality Department of Veterans Affairs military health care Opioid Addiction opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

Taming the pain of sciatica: For most people, time heals and less is more
Despite being a less common cause of low back pain, sciatica is still something I regularly see as a general internist. Primary care doctors can and should manage sciatica, because for most individuals the body can fix the problem. My job is to help manage the pain while the body does its job. When a person’s symptoms don’t improve, I discuss the role of surgery or an injection to speed things up. What is sciatica? Sciatica refers to pain caused by the sciatic nerve that carries messages from the brain down the spinal cord to the legs. The pain of sciatica typically radiates down one side from the lower back in...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steven J. Atlas, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Stop the war against patients with intractable pain
An open letter to doctors still prescribing opioid medication when necessary: Thank you so much for standing up for us pain patients. My chronic pain comes from a genetic connective tissue disorder (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome), so there is no treatment or cure for my slow, but relentless, physical deterioration as the collagen holding my body together falls apart. I, like so many other pain patients, spent years (1982-1995) trying other therapies (yoga, acupuncture, chiropractic, diets, supplements, PT, lots of exercise) and non-opioid drugs (anti-epileptics and antidepressants) with horrible intolerable side effects. Continue...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 10, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/angelika-byczkowski" rel="tag" > Angelika Byczkowski < /a > Tags: Patient Pain management Source Type: blogs

Here ’s something completely different for low back pain
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a question that has challenged generations of patients and their doctors. The answer has changed over the years. When I was in medical school in the early 1980s, bedrest for a week or more was often recommended for severe back pain. This sometimes included hospital admission. Then, research demonstrated that prolonged bedrest was actually a bad idea. It was no better (and often worse) than taking it easy for a day or two followed by slowly increasing activity, including stretching and strengthening the back. Medications, including pain relievers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Back Pain Complementary and alternative medicine Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Yes, I ’ve tried that too: When well-intentioned advice hurts
There’s a certain response I have come to expect whenever I share with someone that I suffer from chronic pain. “You should try acupuncture or yoga,” the person will say, often without asking me first if I have actually tried either. I have learned to take such suggestions with a grain of salt, seeing them for what they are: a well-meaning, if usually uninformed, attempt to help me get better. But it’s hard not to feel slighted by these responses, even if the underlying intentions are sincere. When the hair-trigger reaction to me sharing my medical issues is usually to automatically recommend some s...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Emergency acupuncture! (2017 edition)
For whatever reason, acupuncturists and acupuncture believers think that acupuncture can be useful in emergency situations. They even do studies purporting to show that. This is yet another of such a clinical trial, albeit larger than usual. Guess what? It doesn't really show what it's advertised to show. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - June 20, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture ankle sprain emergency room low back pain migraine quackademic medicine Source Type: blogs

More on Olivia
I am beginning to think I am her fan or something as this is my third post about her.... but once again I am blogging about Olivia Newton John and her cancer recurrence. I have another problem with her and her recurrence. This is it in her statement about what her plans are for recurrence:" I decided on my direction of therapies after consultation with my doctors and natural therapists... "Her plan is to focus on radiation and natural therapies.... I don't have a problem with natural therapies but I do have a problem with their use without additional medical therapies.I used to work with a woman who was diagnosed...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: alternative medicine cancer treatment Source Type: blogs

Quackery invades another once science-based journal
As quackery in the form of “integrative medicine” has increasingly been “integrated” into medicine, medical journals are starting to notice and succumb to the temptation to decrease their skepticism. The BMJ, unfortunately, is the latest to do so. It won’t be the last. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 30, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture quackademic medicine systematic review The BMJ Source Type: blogs

Tell the FDA not to embrace quackery: Write to oppose its proposal on acupuncture and chiropractic for chronic pain
Chiropractors and acupuncturists have lobbied for a greater role in treating pain. They might well have won it. Last week, the FDA released proposed changes Wednesday to its blueprint on educating health care providers about treating pain, which now recommend that doctors learn about chiropractic care and acupuncture as therapies that might help patients avoid opioids. There’s still time to stop this, but you have to write the FDA. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 22, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Chiropractic chronic pain fda opioid opioid addiction regulation Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture versus science, acupuncture apologist edition
In the Journal of Integrative Medicine, acupuncturists argue for modernizing acupuncture by uncoupling it from its traditional Chinese medicine background and avoiding the mystical language about qi and meridians. Hilarity ensues, because acupuncture can't be separated from the prescientific mysticism from which it arose. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 19, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Ted Kaptchuk tongue diagnosis traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture versus science, linguistic edition
In the Journal of Integrative Medicine, acupuncturists argue for modernizing acupuncture by uncoupling it from its traditional Chinese medicine background and avoiding the mystical language about qi and meridians. Hilarity ensues, because acupuncture can't be separated from the prescientific mysticism from which it arose. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 19, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Ted Kaptchuk tongue diagnosis traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Acupuncturists mistake insufficient rigor for bias against them
Acupuncturists complain that the UK's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends treatments for knee osteoarthritis for which the evidence is weak. They think that means that NICE should also accept acupuncture. In reality, it means that NICE should stop recommending treatments without support by strong scientific evidence. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 15, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture clinical trials National Institute for Health and Care Excellence NICE Popular Science Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture: A point in the right direction, or a stab in the dark?
Acupuncture is a treatment that dates back to around 100 BC in China. It is based on traditional Chinese concepts such as qi (pronounced “chee” and considered life force energy) and meridians (paths through which qi flows). Multiple studies have failed to demonstrate any scientific evidence supporting such principles. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin at multiple, varying locations based on the patient’s symptoms. Once inserted, some acupuncturists hand turn the needles for added therapeutic benefit. Although there are many uses for acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Old wine poured into a newer skin: The Society for Integrative Oncology updates its clinical guidelines for breast cancer
Just over two years ago, the Society for Integrative Medicine issued clinical guidelines for breast cancer care. Now it's updated them. Unfortunately, mixing cow pie with apple pie for a little longer doesn't make the cow pie any better than it was last time. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 2, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Homeopathy Naturopathy Quackery acupuncture breast cancer Dugald Seely Heather Greenlee integrative medicine integrative oncology society for integrative oncology Suza Source Type: blogs

In pain? Many doctors say opioids are not the answer - Salon.com
Those of you who have experienced pain, especially gnawing, chronic pain, know that it affects your happiness, outlook and ability to function.In the past couple of years, the treatment of chronic pain has undergone an earthshaking transformation as opioid addiction continues to claim — and ruin — lives.Many primary care doctors no longer liberally prescribe opioid painkillers such as oxycodone, fentanyl and hydrocodone for back pain, migraines and other chronic conditions. Instead, they are increasingly turning to alternative medications and non-drug options such as acupuncture and physical therapy."Most ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 16, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

If you have low back pain try these steps first
Low back pain, the scourge of mankind: it is the second leading cause of disability here in the United States, and the fourth worldwide. It’s also one of the top five medical problems for which people see doctors. Almost every day that I see patients, I see someone with back pain. It’s one of the top reasons for lost wages due to missed work, as well as for healthcare dollars spent, hence, a very expensive problem. Looking at two kinds of back pain Let’s talk about the most common forms of back pain: acute (which lasts less than four weeks) and subacute (which lasts four to 12 weeks). Most of these cases ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Managing your health care Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Why patients feel abandoned by IVF doctors when their cycle fails
I just got this email from a patient.Dear Dr Malpani, I have read your article online and am very much interested on any updates on your article or challenge to Clear Passage Therapy .I have seen this Clinic referred to me by Natural Fertility online and so I went to their website and started the application process including the submission of my medical history. I have gone thru 3 failed IVFs (2 fresh (w/ DNA bx of embryo) and 1 FET cycles), 1 natural pregnancy in between 1 IVFs, all miscarried on 5th week, 10th week, 0 pregnancy on my last IVF w/ DNA. I was diagnosed by my Fertility Doctor at Kaiser with Right ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - April 2, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs