Alternative therapies for cancer
This study was not designed to directly compare non-conventional therapies with conventional ones, and the results do not mean that all unproven remedies are useless. In fact, an unproven treatment may become conventional if rigorous research proves its worth. There are many types of alternative treatments (including herbs, vitamins, homeopathy, yoga, and acupuncture) that might have different effects and have not yet been well studied. Importantly, this study did not examine the interaction of conventional and alternative treatments (which in some cases may cause problems). In addition, this study did not actually find th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Health Source Type: blogs

What is the Therapeutic Alliance?
The Therapeutic Alliance Simply put: the Therapeutic Alliance is the mutual bond between therapist and client, as well as the willingness from the patient to immerse in the treatment experience. While it seems like a little thing, it is the most powerful factor in the process of emotional and psychological healing, according to MentalHelp.net. If you do not trust your therapist, you will not be able to fully open up to them and have honest conversations. Without this openness, there will be no progress made on your past trauma. Without progress made on your past trauma, your addiction will fester again in the future and th...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 25, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Complementary Therapies Comprehensive behavioral treatment Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment behavioral therapy complimentary therapy holistic therapy Therapeutic Alliance therapist Source Type: blogs

How Much Support You Get at Cliffside
Support is here When you enter a treatment facility, it is an extremely life-changing moment. You’re leaving behind old, bad habits and coming to terms with the misgivings that your addiction has presented you. You may feel ashamed, judged, guilty and just at a general emotional low. Looking in the mirror can be tough, and while these feelings are all normal, you will need all the support you can get during this time. This includes not only from your family and close circle, but from your treatment center as well. Once you arrive From the moment you first walk in the door of Cliffside Malibu, you will be surrounded b...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - January 24, 2019 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Rehab Information Drug Rehab Information Sober Living and Aftercare family family support malibu support groups support system treatment treatment facility Source Type: blogs

Natural Remedies That Help Relieve Your Joint Pain?
You're reading Natural Remedies That Help Relieve Your Joint Pain?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. If you are among millions of people suffering from joint pain and arthritis and living on pain-killers for quite a while, there is good news for you-you can have natural remedies to get rid of your pain. Whether you are facing stiffness, reduced the range of movements, and difficulty walking, there are certain natural therapies that are pretty much safer alternatives to taking drugs. According to the Centre...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: smithwillas Tags: health and fitness Joint pain natural remedies Source Type: blogs

Natural Remedies That Help Relieve Your Joint Pain
You're reading Natural Remedies That Help Relieve Your Joint Pain, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. If you are among millions of people suffering from joint pain and arthritis and living on pain-killers for quite a while, there is good news for you-you can have natural remedies to get rid of your pain. Whether you are facing stiffness, reduced the range of movements, and difficulty walking, there are certain natural therapies that are pretty much safer alternatives to taking drugs. According to the Centre ...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: smithwillas Tags: health and fitness Joint pain natural remedies Source Type: blogs

What Are The Best Natural Remedies That Help Relieve Your Joint Pain?
You're reading What Are The Best Natural Remedies That Help Relieve Your Joint Pain?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. If you are among millions of people suffering from joint pain and arthritis and living on pain-killers for quite a while, there is good news for you-you can have natural remedies to get rid of your pain. Whether you are facing stiffness, reduced the range of movements, and difficulty walking, there are certain natural therapies that are pretty much safer alternatives to taking drugs. Accor...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: smithwillas Tags: health and fitness Joint pain natural remedies Source Type: blogs

The IVF Checklist
IVF can seem to be a demanding and complex treatment, which is why it helps if you are well   organised !1. Make sure you have completed all your testsWife□ Ovarian reserve testing ( AMH, prolactin, TSH, antral follicle count)□ Infectious disease screen: HIV, Hepatitis, RPR , Rubella□ Vaginal ultrasound scanHusband□ Semen analysisInfectious disease screen: HIV, Hepatitis, RPR/VDRLPlease note how short this list is !Don't waste your money on useless and unnecessary tests such as sperm DNA fragmentation, TB testing, ERA, genetic testing or hysteroscopy !2. Make sure you know how much you have to p...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - January 1, 2019 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Expectations – and communicating
There are times when I look at the research on persistent pain and treatment, and I begin to wonder why I’m still so positive about this field! After all, it seems that although a biopsychosocial or multidimensional framework for pain has been around since the 1970’s, I’m still encountering reasonably recently-graduated clinicians who sincerely believe that whatever treatment they’ve learned is the Bee’s Knees, and Will Truly Fix All Pain. And people who firmly believe that All Pain Is X. Or Y. Or Z. And surely we should do what they say (pay the fee, get the certificate, perhaps even levels 3...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - December 9, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Back pain Pain conditions Professional topics Research Resilience/Health beliefs communication expectations goals listening Source Type: blogs

What to Look For in Luxury Treatment
Individualized Treatment When you are looking for a luxury treatment center, it is extremely important that you find individualized treatment for your needs. No two addictions are the same; everyone has different experiences, traumas and life stories that lead to addiction. Detoxing and withdrawal symptoms can differ in severity, circumstances are different from client to client and needs are constantly changing. That’s why it is important that you find a luxury treatment center that will take the time to develop a plan for your individual needs. Evidence-Based Treatment Upon entering luxury treatment, you will first...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - December 6, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Rehab Information Complementary Therapies Drug Rehab Information Sober Living and Aftercare luxury luxury drug rehabilitation luxury heroin rehab Source Type: blogs

An interview with Rosi Sexton: polymath
Jump to follow-up On Sunday 23 September, we recorded an interview with Rosi Sexton. Ever since I got to know her, I’ve been impressed by her polymathy. She’s a musician, a mathematician and a champion athlete, and now an osteopath: certainly an unusual combination. You can read about her on her Wikipedia page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosi_Sexton. The video is long and wide-ranging, so I’ll give some bookmarks, in case you don’t want to watch it all. (And please excuse my garish London marathon track suit.) Rosi recently started to take piano lessons again, after a 20 year break. She plays Ch...
Source: DC's goodscience - November 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Colquhoun Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

PTSD and Trauma Leading to Addiction
If you feel as if your PTSD and addiction are linked, and your trauma is leading to addiction, chances are you are probably right. The good news is that you are not alone. Time reports that about 50-66 percent of those who suffer from PTSD also battle simultaneous addiction. In addition, around 50% of individuals seeking substance use treatment also suffer from PTSD according to MentalHelp. Co-Occurring PTSD and Addiction PTSD, which stands for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, is defined as a psychiatric disorder that can occur in people who have experienced or witnessed a traumatic event such as a natural disaster, a serio...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 23, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction Treatment and Program Resources Alcohol Anxiety Drinking Drug Treatment Mental Health PTSD Substance Abuse alcoholism co-occurring disorder co-occurring disorders co-occurring disorders trea Source Type: blogs

Can I Become Addicted to My Anxiety Medication?
What is Anxiety? Having anxiety is a difficult issue suffered by millions. It is much more than just butterflies in your stomach before going on stage or before an important event – it can be crippling and can cause severe impacts on one’s life, and you may need to be on anxiety medication to help with the symptoms. According to anxiety.org, there are many anxiety-related disorders, and they are divided into three main categories: Anxiety disorders Obsessive-compulsive and related disorders Trauma and stressor-related disorders Anxiety disorders are characterized by a general feature of excessive fear (i.e. e...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - October 8, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Addiction Addiction Recovery Addiction to Pharmaceuticals Anxiety Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment PTSD anxiety medication benzodiazepines Source Type: blogs

Holistic therapy and how they help fight addiction
What is holistic therapy? Holistic therapy is defined as non-medicinal recovery methods. At Cliffside, we use holistic therapy to complement traditional treatment practices. Holistic therapy aims to bring the mind, body and spirit into alignment. It focuses on the patient’s overall well-being while also treating physical symptoms of addiction and withdrawal. They can be very beneficial to addiction therapy because they can be calming, healing outlets to use in place of old behaviors. They support the constant growth of each patient – mentally, physically, emotionally and spiritually. Holistic therapy aids in he...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - August 14, 2018 Category: Addiction Authors: Jaclyn Uloth Tags: Acupuncture Addiction Addiction Recovery Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Complementary Therapies Drinking Drug Rehab Information Drug Treatment Eating Disorders Exercise Healthy Eating and Recovery Holistic Treatment Source Type: blogs

Civilian Casualties Continue to Mount in Governments ’ War on Opioids
I have written  here and here about how patients have become the civilian casualties of the misguided policies addressing the opioid (now predominantly fentanyl and heroin) crisis. The policies have dramatically reduced opioid prescribing by health care practitioners and have pressured them into rapidly tapering or cutting off their chronic pain patients from the opioids that have allowed them to function. More and more reports appear in the pres s about patients becoming desperate because their doctors, often fearing they may lose their livelihoods if they are seen as “outliers” b...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - July 24, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Jeffrey A. Singer Source Type: blogs

HEAL Initiative | National Institutes of Health (NIH)
In April 2018, NIH launched the HEAL (Helping to End Addiction Long-term) Initiative, an aggressive, trans-agency effort to speed scientific solutions to stem the national opioid public health crisis. This Initiative will build on extensive, well-established NIH research, including basic science of the complex neurological pathways involved in pain and addiction, implementation science to develop and test treatment models, and research to integrate behavioral interventions with Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) for opioid use disorder (OUD). Successes from this research include the development of the nasal form of naloxo...
Source: Psychology of Pain - June 12, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

Surprise! Surprise! (Well, actually, no.) Acupuncture does not work for in vitro fertilization
Australian researchers have carried out another randomized clinical trial on acupuncture for in vitro fertilization. Unsurprisingly, it's completely negative. Also unsurprisingly, acupuncturists are not happy and are furiously making excuses. The post Surprise! Surprise! (Well, actually, no.) Acupuncture does not work for in vitro fertilization appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 17, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture featured in vitro fertilziation infertility ivf traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

PLOS ONE publishes a howler of a bad acupuncture network meta-analysis
Meta-analyses can sometimes suffer from the “GIGO problem” (garbage in, garbage out). The publication of a “crappy” acupuncture “network meta-analysis” for acupuncture and chronic constipation illustrates the GIGO problem on steroids a.nd reveals a problem with peer review at PLOS ONE, where it was published The post PLOS ONE publishes a howler of a bad acupuncture network meta-analysis appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 14, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Clinical trials Integrative medicine Quackery acupuncture electroacupunture featured meta-analysis PLoS ONE Source Type: blogs

How to Inspire Your Writing (and Your Life) Every Day
There are various clever quotes about why inspiration is unnecessary for writing. After all, writing is work. After all, plumbers don’t need to be inspired to do their jobs; they just do their jobs. The same goes for electricians, attorneys, and doctors. And if we wait to write until we’re hit by some magical wand of inspiration, we might never start in the first place. This is true. Being able to work whether you feel inspired or not is important. It’s a great skill. And yet inspiration is critical, too. In a piece entitled “Why Inspiration Matters,” Scott Barry Kaufman writes, “Inspira...
Source: World of Psychology - May 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Creativity General Habits Inspiration & Hope Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Success & Achievement aesthetics Motivation writing Source Type: blogs

House E & C Subcommittee on Health Reviews Dozens of Opioid Bills
Conclusion Chairman Burgess indicated that he is still deciding whether to combine numerous opioid-related bills into a single legislative package or try to move the bills through committee individually. Chairman Burgess noted that it is possible to put all of the legislation together in one package, but added that part of him “wants to consider them as individual bills so that, as we go through at least the subcommittee markup and the full committee markup, there will be ample opportunity for people’s ideas to be heard.”         (Source: Policy and Medicine)
Source: Policy and Medicine - April 16, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

O ’NA HealthCare: A new healthcare insurance option?
I was recently invited to speak at David Wolfe’s Longevity NOW conference in Anaheim, California, where I gave a talk entitled “Germs, Muscle, and Pac-Man: New Strategies for Turning the Clock Back 10 or 20 Years” detailing some new strategies for maintaining youthfulness and vigor. (It was a longevity conference, after all. I shall be posting a similar talk on our Undoctored Inner Circle website in the next few days.) Of the 40-some vendor booths that were part of the conference, there was one that caught my eye: O’NA HealthCare. They claim to provide coverage for functional medicine care, integrat...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - April 11, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: Undoctored Wheat Belly Lifestyle health insurance healthcare low-cost Source Type: blogs

The previously undiscovered organ known as the “ interstitium ” revisited: The Deepak Chopra connection
Yesterday, Orac discussed a widely hyped new scientific finding of a "new organ" known as the interstitium, in which the authors of the study suggested that their findings might "explain" acupuncture. Today, Orac realizes that the woo goes much, much deeper. Deepak Chopra, anyone? The post The previously undiscovered organ known as the “interstitium” revisited: The Deepak Chopra connection appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 4, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Physics Quackery Religion Science Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Deepak Chopra featured interstitium Neil Theise Source Type: blogs

The “ interstitium ” : Interesting science versus PR spin and pseudoscience
Last week, the media were awash with reports of the "interstitium," which was dramatically described as a hitherto undiscovered "organ," a narrative that was definitely a triumph of PR over science that went beyond what even the investigators claimed in their paper. Worse, the investigators themselves even speculated that their discovery could "explain" acupuncture and other kinds of alternative medicine, thus providing an opening for quacks to run wild with their discovery, something I expect to see very soon. The post The “interstitium”: Interesting science versus PR spin and pse...
Source: Respectful Insolence - April 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Biology Cancer Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Science acupressure acupuncture collagen complementary and alternative mediciner featured interstitium lymphatic system Neil Theise quackery Rebecca Wel Source Type: blogs

I ’m a doctor but I didn’t mean to be a drug pusher
I never wanted to be a drug pusher. A career in medicine was the opposite — healing in place of harming. However, I knew something was wrong when a detective asked to speak to me about one of my patients. My patient, addicted to Vicodin, had committed several acts of fraud and theft in desperate attempt to satisfy her needs. Her arrest was the final step in a long, slow unraveling of a happy and productive life. I was not just a witness to this painful process; I was an active participant. As her primary care physician, I helped fuel her addiction and shared in the responsibility. When the history of the opiate epide...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/kevin-haggerty" rel="tag" > Kevin Haggerty, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Bee venom acupuncture: Deadly quackery that can kill
Bee venom acupuncture is a form of apitherapy (treatment with bee products, such as venom, honey, or pollen) in which bee venom is injected along acupuncture points, often by actual bees. It also recently resulted in the death of a woman from anaphylactic shock. Basically, the use of bee venom acupuncture cannot be justified because it has no proven benefits and is potentially deadly. The post Bee venom acupuncture: Deadly quackery that can kill appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - March 23, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Popular culture Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture anaphylactic shock apitherapy bee pollen bee venom bee venom acupuncture featured Goop Gwyneth Paltrow Source Type: blogs

What ’ s more quackademic medicine than Harvard ’ s acupuncture course? Maybe Duke ’ s reflexology course!
Quackery has thoroughly infiltrated medical academia in the form of "integrative medicine." So what's worse than Harvard offering an acupuncture course? It might be Duke offering a reflexology and reiki course. The post What’s more quackademic medicine than Harvard’s acupuncture course? Maybe Duke’s reflexology course! appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 23, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Duke Integrative Medicine Duke University featured Harvard University quackademic medicine reflexology Source Type: blogs

Quackademic medicine versus being “ science-based ”
A couple of weeks ago, I was interviewed by the a reporter from the Georgetown student newsletter about its integrative medicine program. It got me to thinking how delusion that one’s work is science-based can lead to collaborations with New Age “quantum” mystics like Deepak Chopra. "Integrative medicine" doctors engaging in what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine all claim to be "evidence-based" or "science-based." The words apparently do not mean what integrative medicine academics think they mean. The post Quackademic medicine versus being “science-based&rdqu...
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 19, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bad science Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture Aviad Haramati Chopra Center Deepak Chopra featured Georgetown University Hakima Amri homeopathy Source Type: blogs

House Holds Hearing on Opioid Crisis
Discussion at the hearing largely focused on the desire to pass bipartisan legislation to address the opioid crisis as well as to determine best practices to identify over-prescribers and reduce instances of fraud. Opening Statements Chairwoman Lynn Jenkins opened the hearing by highlighting statistics regarding rising opioid related overdose death rates in her home state of Kansas. She went on to state that the “immense cost opioids impose on society” have caused a loss of productivity and put undue burden on the U.S. economic system. To lessen this burden, Jenkins stressed the importance to provide Medicare...
Source: Policy and Medicine - February 15, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Thomas Sullivan - Policy & Medicine Writing Staff Source Type: blogs

Expert advice on how to quit smoking
Okay, everyone knows smoking is bad for you, the number one cause of preventable death in the US and the world, a direct cause of lung and heart disease and cancer… et cetera. So let’s get right down to the nitty-gritty: quitting smoking is tough. What can people do to quit? To answer this question, I spoke with my colleague Nancy Rigotti, MD. Dr. Rigotti is director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Tobacco Research and Treatment Center. She has extensively researched nicotine and tobacco, evaluated public policies on tobacco, contributed to US Surgeon General’s Reports, and authored clinical guidel...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Health Heart Health Lung disease Prevention Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs

The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health: Exaggerating the evidence for acupuncture to make it appear to be more than an elaborate placebo
The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health is a group dedicated to promoting "integrative medicine" in medical academia that has, unfortunately, been very successful over the last two decades. Recently, it published a report that promotes acupuncture as a tool to combat the opioid epidemic Let's just put it this way. The ACIMH exaggerates the evidence rather obviously. The post The Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health: Exaggerating the evidence for acupuncture to make it appear to be more than an elaborate placebo appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 7, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine and Health acupuncture Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Source Type: blogs

Quackademic medicine triumphant (yet again): A defense of acupuncture on the Harvard Health Blog that misses the point
If you want yet another piece of evidence that quackademic medicine, where once science-based medical schools embrace quackery, is triumphant, is needed, look no further than a fallacy-filled blog post on the Harvard Health Blog in defense of acupuncture. The post Quackademic medicine triumphant (yet again): A defense of acupuncture on the Harvard Health Blog that misses the point appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 1, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Integrative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture acupuncture points Carolyn Bernstein featured Harvard Health Blog Harvard Medical School Helene Langevin quackademic medicine Source Type: blogs

Blood Vessel on a Chip to Study Angiogenesis and Test Anti-Cancer Drugs
Scientists at the Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, have developed a blood vessel on a chip. The device makes it simpler to study angiogenesis, the process of new blood vessel growth. In addition, the technology could aid researchers in developing new anti-cancer drugs that act by inhibiting angiogenesis in tumors. Angiogenesis is a therapeutic target for some anti-cancer drugs. Inhibiting blood vessel formation in tumors can slow their growth and is a promising therapeutic strategy. However, testing new angiogenesis-inhibiting drugs can be a challenge, and animal models are frequently required. &ld...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Cardiology Genetics Medicine Source Type: blogs

More on the funding of acupuncture quackery by Medicaid
A few weeks ago, I described how acupuncture advocates appeared to have successfully snookered the Ohio Medicaid program into funding the quackery that is acupuncture for Medicaid recipients. Now, they're poised to go beyond Ohio The post More on the funding of acupuncture quackery by Medicaid appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 29, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Integrative medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture featured Medicaid Ohio Oregon Vermont Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture for headache
It is easy to ridicule a 2000-year-old treatment that can seem closer to magic than to science. Indeed, from the 1970s to around 2005, the skeptic’s point of view was understandable, because the scientific evidence to show that acupuncture worked, and why, was weak, and clinical trials were small and of poor quality. But things have changed since then. A lot. Thanks to the development of valid placebo controls (for example, a retractable “sham” device that looks like an acupuncture needle but does not penetrate the skin), and the publication of several large and well-designed clinical trials in the last d...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Helene Langevin, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

More “ auricular ” acupuncture: Our veterans deserve science-based medicine, not quackery
Over the last several years, the Veterans Health Administration has been increasing the amount of quackery being offered in VA hospitals and clinics. This time around, it's auricular acupuncture. The post More “auricular” acupuncture: Our veterans deserve science-based medicine, not quackery appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 11, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture auricular acupuncture battlefield acupuncture featured Veterans Administration Veterans Health Administration Source Type: blogs

The next frontier in “ integrative medicine ” : Getting Medicaid to fund quackery
Naturopaths are not the only relentless quacks seeking to bend government to legitimize their quackery. Acupuncturists are now working to get Medicaid to fund acupuncture services. They are succeeding. The post The next frontier in “integrative medicine”: Getting Medicaid to fund quackery appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 3, 2018 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Politics Popular culture Pseudoscience Quackery acupuncture featured Jared West John Kasich Medicaid Ohio Vermont Source Type: blogs

How to treat dry eyes
How common are dye eyes?The prevalence of dry eyes has been estimated to be 5-30% percent in persons aged 50 years and older, 7% of US adult population has been diagnosed with dry eye disease. The prevalence increases with age (2.7% in those 18 to 34 years old vs. 19% in those aged 75 years and older). Prevalence is higher in women than men (9% versus 4%).What are the risk factors for dry eye disease?- Advanced age- Female gender- Hormonal changes (primarily due to decreased androgens)- Systemic diseases (eg, diabetes mellitus, Parkinson disease)- Contact lens wear- Systemic medications (antihistamines, anticholinergi...
Source: Clinical Cases and Images - Blog - January 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: noreply at blogger.com (Ves Dimov) Tags: Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Acupressure App – Does it really alleviate menstrual cramps?
The media is abuzz over a study reporting that use of a cell phone app to train women in self-acupressure is effective as pain medication for treating menstrual cramps. The Android app is called AKUD and is written in German, so unless du sprichst Deutch, it won’t do you much good. But let’s ignore that for now. Here’s the study intervention: The study intervention Participants received a menstrual tracking App that included instructions on acupressure for cramp relief. They also got one-on-one instruction on the location of specific acupressure points and use of acupressure using drawings and v...
Source: The Blog That Ate Manhattan - December 12, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: Margaret Polaneczky, MD Tags: Alternative Medicine Women's Health app cell phone menstrual cramps Source Type: blogs

What to do for stubborn low back pain
A while back, I covered the updated evidence-based treatment guidelines for acute (less than four weeks) and subacute (less than twelve weeks) low back pain. I promised a post on chronic (more than twelve weeks) back pain. Well, as I write this, I am suffering from a recurrence of my own low back pain, which radiates down my right leg at times. This has been literally and figuratively a pain in my rear end, for years. Being a doctor who practices what I preach, I am putting all the advice I dispense to good use. First, look for possible triggers This fall, I had gotten away from my regular core-strengthening routine (night...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Lowering the bar for traditional Chinese medicine for ideology and profit
In the 1950s, Chairman Mao Zedong began the "integration" of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) into real medicine. Last year, the Chinese government passed a bill to promote the sale of TCM products. This. year, we see what that means. The post Lowering the bar for traditional Chinese medicine for ideology and profit appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - December 7, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Politics Quackery acupuncture Chairman Mao China featured Mao Zedong traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Don ’t let the opioid crisis affect the treatment course for your patients
Mrs. Smith is an 81-year-old female. She worked a long time doing very physical work and is now on a fixed income and comes to my office with chronic pain. X-rays show she has degenerative arthritis in her hips, knees and lumbar spine. She has taken Norco twice a day for years and has been able to be very stable on this. She has always been compliant with her medications. She has not lost them or had them stolen. She lives with her husband, and they use a safe where they keep their medications. The patient has done well with acupuncture and massage in the past but is not able to afford these, and her insurance doesn’...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/t-j-matsumoto" rel="tag" > T.J. Matsumoto, PA-C < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

First Electronic Device for Opioid Withdrawal Therapy Approved by FDA
The FDA has given a regulatory green light to the first device that reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms. The NSS-2 Bridge from Innovative Health Solutions, a Versailles, Indiana firm, is stuck to the skin behind the ear and relies on four electrodes that are attached around the ear. The electrodes are used to deliver electric current to a set of occipital and cranial nerves (V, VII, IX, and X), hopefully helping addicts to avoid agitation, insomnia, and other symptoms of kicking opioids. The same device was approved by the FDA three years ago for use in acupuncture and the current approval went under the de novo review...
Source: Medgadget - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Neurology Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The cost of chronic pain
There is a saying that being poor is expensive. From personal experience, I know this to be true. But I think it also needs to be said that, especially in the United States, chronic illness can be quite expensive as well. In fact, there is a huge intersection between poverty and disability/illness. As with many intersections, it is a chicken-or-egg scenario, difficult to determine which is begetting which. But one thing is clear: there are often blind spots about these expenses in the medical community and how they can impact chronically ill people already struggling with finances. Recently I attended a seminar on the topi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Health Health care Health policy Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Nanoporous Needles May Significantly Boost Effectiveness of Acupuncture
Acupuncture still has a way to go to prove itself useful in many clinical applications, but its effectiveness may be significantly boosted by improving the needles that are used. A study in journal Nature Scientific Reports by researchers at DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea) introduces acupuncture needles that have minuscule holes throughout them that are from nanometer to micrometer in scale. The new needles have a significantly greater surface area, about ten times that common needles of the same size would have. The researchers, in a study on lab rats with colorectal ca...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Conference Review: 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium - Day 1
by Christian Sinclair (@ctsinclair)It is a testament to the growth and mainstream acceptance of palliative care, that there is a sub-sub-specialty two-day conference like the#PallOnc conference held in San Diego this past weekend. If you have not heard of this meeting yet, and the majority of your work in that intersection between oncology and palliative care, I would highly recommend considering it in the future. This is the 4th consecutive year the meeting has been held, and I applaud the commitment of the four co-sponsoring organizations (AAHPM, ASCO, ASTRO and MASCC). Kristina Newport and Shanthi Sivendranreviewed this...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 30, 2017 Category: Palliative Care Tags: conference reviews oncology palliative sinclair Source Type: blogs

Alternative medicine for cancer: Greater scrutiny is needed
As the calendar turns to early October, I’m reminded that this is the 6th anniversary of Steve Jobs’ death. At the time of his death, I was a medical student and my wife had just completed six months of chemotherapy. I was surprised to learn that Jobs had died from complications of cancer and shocked to discover that he had initially refused conventional cancer treatment in favor of alternative medicines. At first, I found it difficult to understand how someone with the intellectual and financial resources of Steve Jobs could make such a decision — but I was quickly reminded of the massive amounts of misi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skyler-johnson" rel="tag" > Skyler Johnson, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Endocrinology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

On the " integration " of quackery into the medical school curriculum
On the"integration" of quackery into the medical school curriculumQEDCon is fast approaching (indeed, I can't believe I have to leave for Manchester tomorrow night), and because my talk there will be about the phenomenon of " integrative medicine, " I've been thinking a lot about it. As I put together my slides, I can't help but see my talk evolving to encompass both " integrative " medicine and what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine, but that's not surprising. The two phenomenon are related, and it's hard to determine which has a more pernicious effect on science in medicine.One aspe...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 11, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

On the "integration" of quackery into the medical school curriculum
On the "integration" of quackery into the medical school curriculumQEDCon is fast approaching (indeed, I can't believe I have to leave for Manchester tomorrow night), and because my talk there will be about the phenomenon of "integrative medicine," I've been thinking a lot about it. As I put together my slides, I can't help but see my talk evolving to encompass both "integrative" medicine and what I like to refer to as quackademic medicine, but that's not surprising. The two phenomenon are related, and it's hard to determine which has a more pernicious effect on science in medicine.One aspect ...
Source: Respectful Insolence - October 11, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: oracknows Source Type: blogs

A blog post on blog posts: Fact, fiction, and friction
A blog by definition is a regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or group, and is written in an informal or conversational style. As with any conversation, there is usually a blend of fact and opinion. In the case of a blog on medical topics, frequently the opinions are those of experts, and it is not uncommon for such opinions to lead to healthy debate. Fake news or skewed views? We make many decisions on the basis of research studies, and this is particularly the case in medicine. The non-medical media often does a good job of sensationalizing research in ways that are at times excessiv...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

3 things parents should know about complementary and alternative medicine
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire More and more, I have families in my practice who are trying out treatments and therapies I didn’t prescribe. Most of the time, it’s absolutely fine. Other times, it’s not. “Complementary and alternative medicine” is a broad term that refers to treatments that are not generally part of traditional Western medicine. It includes things like herbal remedies, dietary supplements or alternative diets, acupuncture, acupressure, homeopathy, Chinese remedies, Reiki, or hypnosis. It also includes things like yoga or meditation — and chiropractic medicine. Many of th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Complementary and alternative medicine Parenting Source Type: blogs

A new nomenclature for auricular acupuncture: The ultimate in Tooth Fairy science
Tooth Fairy science is the study of a phenomenon before having actually demonstrated that the phenomenon actually exists. I can't think of a better example than trying to construct an elaborate mapping system of body parts and organs to the surface of the external ear for purposes of sticking needles in them to heal and relieve pain (auricular acupuncture). Yet that's what's just been published. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - August 25, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture auricular acupuncture homunculus Source Type: blogs