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What to do for stubborn low back pain
A while back, I covered the updated evidence-based treatment guidelines for acute (less than four weeks) and subacute (less than twelve weeks) low back pain. I promised a post on chronic (more than twelve weeks) back pain. Well, as I write this, I am suffering from a recurrence of my own low back pain, which radiates down my right leg at times. This has been literally and figuratively a pain in my rear end, for years. Being a doctor who practices what I preach, I am putting all the advice I dispense to good use. First, look for possible triggers This fall, I had gotten away from my regular core-strengthening routine (night...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Lowering the bar for traditional Chinese medicine for ideology and profit
In the 1950s, Chairman Mao Zedong began the "integration" of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) into real medicine. Last year, the Chinese government passed a bill to promote the sale of TCM products. This. year, we see what that means. The post Lowering the bar for traditional Chinese medicine for ideology and profit appeared first on RESPECTFUL INSOLENCE. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - December 7, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Medicine Politics Quackery acupuncture Chairman Mao China featured Mao Zedong traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Don ’t let the opioid crisis affect the treatment course for your patients
Mrs. Smith is an 81-year-old female. She worked a long time doing very physical work and is now on a fixed income and comes to my office with chronic pain. X-rays show she has degenerative arthritis in her hips, knees and lumbar spine. She has taken Norco twice a day for years and has been able to be very stable on this. She has always been compliant with her medications. She has not lost them or had them stolen. She lives with her husband, and they use a safe where they keep their medications. The patient has done well with acupuncture and massage in the past but is not able to afford these, and her insurance doesn’...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - November 21, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/t-j-matsumoto" rel="tag" > T.J. Matsumoto, PA-C < /a > Tags: Meds Pain Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

First Electronic Device for Opioid Withdrawal Therapy Approved by FDA
The FDA has given a regulatory green light to the first device that reduces opioid withdrawal symptoms. The NSS-2 Bridge from Innovative Health Solutions, a Versailles, Indiana firm, is stuck to the skin behind the ear and relies on four electrodes that are attached around the ear. The electrodes are used to deliver electric current to a set of occipital and cranial nerves (V, VII, IX, and X), hopefully helping addicts to avoid agitation, insomnia, and other symptoms of kicking opioids. The same device was approved by the FDA three years ago for use in acupuncture and the current approval went under the de novo review...
Source: Medgadget - November 15, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Neurology Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

The cost of chronic pain
There is a saying that being poor is expensive. From personal experience, I know this to be true. But I think it also needs to be said that, especially in the United States, chronic illness can be quite expensive as well. In fact, there is a huge intersection between poverty and disability/illness. As with many intersections, it is a chicken-or-egg scenario, difficult to determine which is begetting which. But one thing is clear: there are often blind spots about these expenses in the medical community and how they can impact chronically ill people already struggling with finances. Recently I attended a seminar on the topi...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Health Health care Health policy Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Nanoporous Needles May Significantly Boost Effectiveness of Acupuncture
Acupuncture still has a way to go to prove itself useful in many clinical applications, but its effectiveness may be significantly boosted by improving the needles that are used. A study in journal Nature Scientific Reports by researchers at DGIST (Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea) introduces acupuncture needles that have minuscule holes throughout them that are from nanometer to micrometer in scale. The new needles have a significantly greater surface area, about ten times that common needles of the same size would have. The researchers, in a study on lab rats with colorectal ca...
Source: Medgadget - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: News Source Type: blogs

Conference Review: 2017 Palliative and Supportive Care in Oncology Symposium - Day 1
by Christian Sinclair (@ctsinclair)It is a testament to the growth and mainstream acceptance of palliative care, that there is a sub-sub-specialty two-day conference like the#PallOnc conference held in San Diego this past weekend. If you have not heard of this meeting yet, and the majority of your work in that intersection between oncology and palliative care, I would highly recommend considering it in the future. This is the 4th consecutive year the meeting has been held, and I applaud the commitment of the four co-sponsoring organizations (AAHPM, ASCO, ASTRO and MASCC). Kristina Newport and Shanthi Sivendranreviewed this...
Source: Pallimed: A Hospice and Palliative Medicine Blog - October 30, 2017 Category: Palliative Care Tags: conference reviews oncology palliative sinclair Source Type: blogs

Alternative medicine for cancer: Greater scrutiny is needed
As the calendar turns to early October, I’m reminded that this is the 6th anniversary of Steve Jobs’ death. At the time of his death, I was a medical student and my wife had just completed six months of chemotherapy. I was surprised to learn that Jobs had died from complications of cancer and shocked to discover that he had initially refused conventional cancer treatment in favor of alternative medicines. At first, I found it difficult to understand how someone with the intellectual and financial resources of Steve Jobs could make such a decision — but I was quickly reminded of the massive amounts of misi...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - October 14, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skyler-johnson" rel="tag" > Skyler Johnson, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Endocrinology Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

A blog post on blog posts: Fact, fiction, and friction
A blog by definition is a regularly updated website or web page, typically one run by an individual or group, and is written in an informal or conversational style. As with any conversation, there is usually a blend of fact and opinion. In the case of a blog on medical topics, frequently the opinions are those of experts, and it is not uncommon for such opinions to lead to healthy debate. Fake news or skewed views? We make many decisions on the basis of research studies, and this is particularly the case in medicine. The non-medical media often does a good job of sensationalizing research in ways that are at times excessiv...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

3 things parents should know about complementary and alternative medicine
Follow me on Twitter @drClaire More and more, I have families in my practice who are trying out treatments and therapies I didn’t prescribe. Most of the time, it’s absolutely fine. Other times, it’s not. “Complementary and alternative medicine” is a broad term that refers to treatments that are not generally part of traditional Western medicine. It includes things like herbal remedies, dietary supplements or alternative diets, acupuncture, acupressure, homeopathy, Chinese remedies, Reiki, or hypnosis. It also includes things like yoga or meditation — and chiropractic medicine. Many of th...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Claire McCarthy, MD Tags: Children's Health Complementary and alternative medicine Parenting Source Type: blogs

A new nomenclature for auricular acupuncture: The ultimate in Tooth Fairy science
Tooth Fairy science is the study of a phenomenon before having actually demonstrated that the phenomenon actually exists. I can't think of a better example than trying to construct an elaborate mapping system of body parts and organs to the surface of the external ear for purposes of sticking needles in them to heal and relieve pain (auricular acupuncture). Yet that's what's just been published. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - August 25, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture auricular acupuncture homunculus Source Type: blogs

Stopping Epidemics At The Source: Applying Lessons From Cholera To The Opioid Crisis
On September 8, 1854, acting on the advice of Dr. John Snow, London municipal authorities removed the pump handle from the Broad Street well in an effort to halt a major outbreak of cholera. Although an anesthesiologist by profession, Snow had methodically mapped the homes of new cases of cholera. He found that many clustered around the Broad Street pump. Snow’s findings, still regarded as a classic example of epidemiology, established the principle: “that the most important information to have about any communicable disease is its mode of communication.” Dr. Snow did not establish the biologic mechanism ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - August 4, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Chester Buckenmaier III and Eric Schoomaker Tags: Featured Public Health Quality Department of Veterans Affairs military health care Opioid Addiction opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

Taming the pain of sciatica: For most people, time heals and less is more
Despite being a less common cause of low back pain, sciatica is still something I regularly see as a general internist. Primary care doctors can and should manage sciatica, because for most individuals the body can fix the problem. My job is to help manage the pain while the body does its job. When a person’s symptoms don’t improve, I discuss the role of surgery or an injection to speed things up. What is sciatica? Sciatica refers to pain caused by the sciatic nerve that carries messages from the brain down the spinal cord to the legs. The pain of sciatica typically radiates down one side from the lower back in...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steven J. Atlas, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Stop the war against patients with intractable pain
An open letter to doctors still prescribing opioid medication when necessary: Thank you so much for standing up for us pain patients. My chronic pain comes from a genetic connective tissue disorder (Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome), so there is no treatment or cure for my slow, but relentless, physical deterioration as the collagen holding my body together falls apart. I, like so many other pain patients, spent years (1982-1995) trying other therapies (yoga, acupuncture, chiropractic, diets, supplements, PT, lots of exercise) and non-opioid drugs (anti-epileptics and antidepressants) with horrible intolerable side effects. Continue...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 10, 2017 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/angelika-byczkowski" rel="tag" > Angelika Byczkowski < /a > Tags: Patient Pain management Source Type: blogs

Here ’s something completely different for low back pain
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling It’s a question that has challenged generations of patients and their doctors. The answer has changed over the years. When I was in medical school in the early 1980s, bedrest for a week or more was often recommended for severe back pain. This sometimes included hospital admission. Then, research demonstrated that prolonged bedrest was actually a bad idea. It was no better (and often worse) than taking it easy for a day or two followed by slowly increasing activity, including stretching and strengthening the back. Medications, including pain relievers, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Back Pain Complementary and alternative medicine Health Injuries Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Yes, I ’ve tried that too: When well-intentioned advice hurts
There’s a certain response I have come to expect whenever I share with someone that I suffer from chronic pain. “You should try acupuncture or yoga,” the person will say, often without asking me first if I have actually tried either. I have learned to take such suggestions with a grain of salt, seeing them for what they are: a well-meaning, if usually uninformed, attempt to help me get better. But it’s hard not to feel slighted by these responses, even if the underlying intentions are sincere. When the hair-trigger reaction to me sharing my medical issues is usually to automatically recommend some s...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - June 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Kiesel Tags: Behavioral Health Mental Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Emergency acupuncture! (2017 edition)
For whatever reason, acupuncturists and acupuncture believers think that acupuncture can be useful in emergency situations. They even do studies purporting to show that. This is yet another of such a clinical trial, albeit larger than usual. Guess what? It doesn't really show what it's advertised to show. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - June 20, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture ankle sprain emergency room low back pain migraine quackademic medicine Source Type: blogs

More on Olivia
I am beginning to think I am her fan or something as this is my third post about her.... but once again I am blogging about Olivia Newton John and her cancer recurrence. I have another problem with her and her recurrence. This is it in her statement about what her plans are for recurrence:" I decided on my direction of therapies after consultation with my doctors and natural therapists... "Her plan is to focus on radiation and natural therapies.... I don't have a problem with natural therapies but I do have a problem with their use without additional medical therapies.I used to work with a woman who was diagnosed...
Source: Caroline's Breast Cancer Blog - June 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: alternative medicine cancer treatment Source Type: blogs

Quackery invades another once science-based journal
As quackery in the form of “integrative medicine” has increasingly been “integrated” into medicine, medical journals are starting to notice and succumb to the temptation to decrease their skepticism. The BMJ, unfortunately, is the latest to do so. It won’t be the last. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 30, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture quackademic medicine systematic review The BMJ Source Type: blogs

Tell the FDA not to embrace quackery: Write to oppose its proposal on acupuncture and chiropractic for chronic pain
Chiropractors and acupuncturists have lobbied for a greater role in treating pain. They might well have won it. Last week, the FDA released proposed changes Wednesday to its blueprint on educating health care providers about treating pain, which now recommend that doctors learn about chiropractic care and acupuncture as therapies that might help patients avoid opioids. There’s still time to stop this, but you have to write the FDA. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 22, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Politics Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Chiropractic chronic pain fda opioid opioid addiction regulation Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture versus science, acupuncture apologist edition
In the Journal of Integrative Medicine, acupuncturists argue for modernizing acupuncture by uncoupling it from its traditional Chinese medicine background and avoiding the mystical language about qi and meridians. Hilarity ensues, because acupuncture can't be separated from the prescientific mysticism from which it arose. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 19, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Ted Kaptchuk tongue diagnosis traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture versus science, linguistic edition
In the Journal of Integrative Medicine, acupuncturists argue for modernizing acupuncture by uncoupling it from its traditional Chinese medicine background and avoiding the mystical language about qi and meridians. Hilarity ensues, because acupuncture can't be separated from the prescientific mysticism from which it arose. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 19, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Ted Kaptchuk tongue diagnosis traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Acupuncturists mistake insufficient rigor for bias against them
Acupuncturists complain that the UK's National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends treatments for knee osteoarthritis for which the evidence is weak. They think that means that NICE should also accept acupuncture. In reality, it means that NICE should stop recommending treatments without support by strong scientific evidence. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 15, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture clinical trials National Institute for Health and Care Excellence NICE Popular Science Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture: A point in the right direction, or a stab in the dark?
Acupuncture is a treatment that dates back to around 100 BC in China. It is based on traditional Chinese concepts such as qi (pronounced “chee” and considered life force energy) and meridians (paths through which qi flows). Multiple studies have failed to demonstrate any scientific evidence supporting such principles. Acupuncture involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin at multiple, varying locations based on the patient’s symptoms. Once inserted, some acupuncturists hand turn the needles for added therapeutic benefit. Although there are many uses for acupuncture in traditional Chinese medicin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - May 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul G. Mathew, MD, FAAN, FAHS Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Headache Health Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Old wine poured into a newer skin: The Society for Integrative Oncology updates its clinical guidelines for breast cancer
Just over two years ago, the Society for Integrative Medicine issued clinical guidelines for breast cancer care. Now it's updated them. Unfortunately, mixing cow pie with apple pie for a little longer doesn't make the cow pie any better than it was last time. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - May 2, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Cancer Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Homeopathy Naturopathy Quackery acupuncture breast cancer Dugald Seely Heather Greenlee integrative medicine integrative oncology society for integrative oncology Suza Source Type: blogs

In pain? Many doctors say opioids are not the answer - Salon.com
Those of you who have experienced pain, especially gnawing, chronic pain, know that it affects your happiness, outlook and ability to function.In the past couple of years, the treatment of chronic pain has undergone an earthshaking transformation as opioid addiction continues to claim — and ruin — lives.Many primary care doctors no longer liberally prescribe opioid painkillers such as oxycodone, fentanyl and hydrocodone for back pain, migraines and other chronic conditions. Instead, they are increasingly turning to alternative medications and non-drug options such as acupuncture and physical therapy."Most ...
Source: Psychology of Pain - April 16, 2017 Category: Anesthesiology Source Type: blogs

If you have low back pain try these steps first
Low back pain, the scourge of mankind: it is the second leading cause of disability here in the United States, and the fourth worldwide. It’s also one of the top five medical problems for which people see doctors. Almost every day that I see patients, I see someone with back pain. It’s one of the top reasons for lost wages due to missed work, as well as for healthcare dollars spent, hence, a very expensive problem. Looking at two kinds of back pain Let’s talk about the most common forms of back pain: acute (which lasts less than four weeks) and subacute (which lasts four to 12 weeks). Most of these cases ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Monique Tello, MD, MPH Tags: Back Pain Managing your health care Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Why patients feel abandoned by IVF doctors when their cycle fails
I just got this email from a patient.Dear Dr Malpani, I have read your article online and am very much interested on any updates on your article or challenge to Clear Passage Therapy .I have seen this Clinic referred to me by Natural Fertility online and so I went to their website and started the application process including the submission of my medical history. I have gone thru 3 failed IVFs (2 fresh (w/ DNA bx of embryo) and 1 FET cycles), 1 natural pregnancy in between 1 IVFs, all miscarried on 5th week, 10th week, 0 pregnancy on my last IVF w/ DNA. I was diagnosed by my Fertility Doctor at Kaiser with Right ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - April 2, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

The quackery that is “ battlefield acupuncture ” continues to metastasize
"Battlefield acupuncture," which is really a form of ear acupuncture based essentially on a homunculus on the ear, continues to invade and metastasize in the military. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - March 29, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture battlefield acupuncture rapid acupuncture Richard Niemtzow Veterans Administration Source Type: blogs

“ Dr. Seuss monsters ” : The quackery that is “ battlefield acupuncture ” continues to metastasize
"Battlefield acupuncture," which is really a form of ear acupuncture based essentially on a homunculus on the ear, continues to invade and metastasize in the military, complete with Dr. Seuss monsters. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - March 29, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture battlefield acupuncture Patricia Macsparran rapid acupuncture Richard Niemtzow Veterans Administration Source Type: blogs

Adventures in bad veterinary medicine reported by the local media (2017 edition)
Just because people think that sticking needles into their meridians will somehow unblock their qi and fix whatever ails them doesn't mean it's OK to inflict the same nonsense on our pets. Unfortunately, a local TV station disagrees. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - March 28, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture dog Mike Petty Priya Mann Steve Garagiola veterinarian WDIV Source Type: blogs

The feds say restrict opioid use. Now what?
The federal government has declared, through its major health policy agencies, that the number of pain patients on opioids and the dosages they are on should be severely restricted.  The Center for Disease Control (CDC), Veteran’s Administration (VA) and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have all issued new guidelines within the past year to that effect.  Private insurers are following suit, in many cases refusing to pay for high dose opioids. More recently, the American College of Physicians issued new guidelines for the treatment of low back pain that recommend using nonpharmacological ther...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - March 15, 2017 Category: Journals (General) Authors: < a href="http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/cindy-perlin" rel="tag" > Cindy Perlin, LCSW < /a > Tags: Meds Pain management Source Type: blogs

IVF patients need to learn that doctors don't have all the answers
Dear Dr Malpani,I read your recent email with interest, as it relates directly to me.After 5 years of IVF and only one successful transfer, which occurred last year at the age of 49 (2016) and I was pregnant for 11 weeks. Unfortunately the embryo failed at 11 weeks due to Edwards syndrome, but these were my own eggs from about age 46.Since this, I have now done two transfers with donor eggs (23 year old donor) and neither has worked.The only successfully pregnancy I had involved a treatment protocol designed by a fertility immunologist, as a result of extensive and expensive blood tests in the US (exactly a you describe - ...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - March 13, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Medical Marijuana Saves Lives
With so many political crises to attend to daily, it’s hard not to let important issues fall by the wayside. However, with the unveiling of the Republican plan to reform the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the powerful opposition to that plan, nothing is being done to address the opioid abuse epidemic our nation faces. Every day we turn our attention to other matters, Americans die of overdose. But there is something we can do while the national debate on health insurance rages – encourage the use of medical marijuana for pain sufferers. More than half the states in the nation and the District of Columbia have l...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - March 13, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Richard Taite Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

What To Ask Your Doctor (and Why) When You ’ ve Been Diagnosed With Lung Cancer
Heather Mannuel, MD, MBA is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and a Medical Oncologist at the University of Maryland Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center.  Below are a few questions she says to ask your doctor when you’ve been diagnosed with lung cancer, and why they’re important to ask. What kind of lung cancer is this? Lung cancers are divided into small cell and non-small cell types, and the treatment is very different for each of these. What is my stage? The stage helps to give information on whether the cancer is only in the lung or whether it h...
Source: Life in a Medical Center - February 27, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Chris Lindsley Tags: Cancer Source Type: blogs

The Alt-Right and Alt-Med
I’ve suddenly come to realize that a rising political group, the so-called “Alt-Right” (basically nothing more than “…white supremacists who have repackaged the hate and served it up in a more palatable form for human consumption…“) and much of the “Alt Med” movement (including purveyors and proponents of alternative, complementary, integrative, functional, holistic, and assorted other terms for quackery through the years) have a lot in common. Both operate in fact-free zones. Reality doesn’t seem to matter to either of them. Immigrants are objectively not strea...
Source: Musings of a Dinosaur - February 21, 2017 Category: Primary Care Authors: notdeaddinosaur Tags: Medical Source Type: blogs

The American College of Physicians integrates quackery with medicine in its recommendations for managing back pain
One of the overarching themes of this blog, if not the overarching theme, is to expose and combat the infiltration of quackery into medicine. What I’m referring to, of course, is the phenomenon that’s risen over the last 25 years or so in which various pseudoscientific alternative medicine therapies (but I repeat myself) have found… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 14, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Quackery Science Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture American College of Physicians integrative medicine low back pain massage NSAIDs Source Type: blogs

Prescription Lies: Five Myths about Prescription Pain Killers
When you’re in pain, you’re willing to do whatever it takes to feel better. For Americans diagnosed with chronic pain, getting a prescription for an opioid-based pain killer can seem like the only way to regain day-to-day function. But in desperation to find a treatment that effectively manages chronic pain, patients may rush into a treatment plan that fails to live up to their expectations or even meet their medical needs. Here are five of the biggest myths about prescription pain killers and the surprising truths about the drug they conceal. Prescription pain killers are a permanent solution for chronic pai...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - February 12, 2017 Category: Addiction Authors: Richard Taite Tags: Richard Taite Source Type: blogs

An infertile patient's secret thoughts, worries and fears
This is a guest post from a very thoughtful patient of ours.It describes very eloquently the worries and fears which prey on an infertile patient's mind. It's very hard to discuss them with anyone, and bottling them up just makes things worse !--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Isn't it a paradox that when India and world's population is exploding at alarming rate; here I am ,struggling to have a single child for 5 long years and with no idea when the struggle will really end.I am being treated at Malpani's and yesterday the doctor urged...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - February 6, 2017 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Alternative medicine for premature ejaculation? Surprise, surprise! It doesn ’ t work.
I must admit that the last couple of weeks have been rather grim here on the old blog. Betweemn Donald Trump’s White House spewing , an unfortunate patient embracing quackery, pseudoscience at the VA, and more. So it is that I feel as though it might not be a bad idea to step back for… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - February 1, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Paranormal Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture premature ejaculation systematic review traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

Quackery at the VA: Our veterans deserve real medicine, not fake medicine
A reader recounts his tale of being referred for fake medicine at a VA facility. Unfortunately, the VA seems to be papering over its lack of resources in the same way that Chairman Mao did in the 1950s, by "integrating" fake medicine with real medicine. (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 27, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Naturopathy Quackery acupuncture battlefield acupuncture energy medicine fake medicine healing touch Richard Niemtzow Veterans Administration Source Type: blogs

No, torturing colicky infants by sticking them with acupuncture needles won ’ t calm them
So I was distracted yesterday from what I had intended to write about by an irresistible target provided me courtesy of Toby Cosgrove, MD, CEO of The Cleveland Clinic, who bemoaned all those nasty pro-science advocates who had had the temerity to link the antivaccine rant by the director of the Clinic’s Wellness Institute to… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 19, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Bioethics Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Popular culture Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture colic infant Source Type: blogs

Interstate Insurance Sales: Wishful thinking, Or A Viable Policy Option?
Anyone who followed the recent election cycle knows that President-elect Donald Trump made “repeal and replace” a cornerstone of his campaign — referring, of course, to the Affordable Care Act (ACA). He, like Mitt Romney and John McCain did in their respective bids for the presidency, has proposed permitting insurers to sell insurance plans across state lines as a possible alternative to the ACA, or at least as a component of a potential alternative. In this post, we’ll take a look at the possible advantages of allowing interstate insurance sales, as well as the reasons opponents say such a policy s...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - January 18, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: John Marchica Tags: Costs and Spending Featured Insurance and Coverage Public Health interstate insurance section 1333 Source Type: blogs

An acupuncturist attacks “ pseudoskeptics ” on Wikipedia. Hilarity ensues.
Back in the day, quacks and cranks liked Wikipedia. Because anyone can become an editor on Wikipedia, they assumed that they could just sign up to edit Wikipedia pages and change them to reflect their views on alternative medicine or whatever other pseudoscientific topic they believed in. When Wikipedia first emerged on the scene, I… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - January 4, 2017 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking acupuncture Jimmy Wales Michael Cummings pseudoskepticism Wikipedia Source Type: blogs

Breaking Down The Final 2018 Letter To Issuers
Editor’s note: The final 2018 Letter To Issuers In The Federally Facilitated Maketplaces, discussed below, was issued in conjunction with the final 2018 Benefit and Payment Parameters rule, discussed here and here. On December 16, 2016, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) at the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released its final 2018 Letter to Issuers in the Federally Facilitated Marketplaces (FFM). CMS releases a letter each year to insurers that offer coverage through the FFM or through state-based marketplaces that use the Healthcare.gov platform (SBM-FP), laying out the ground ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - December 19, 2016 Category: Health Management Authors: Timothy Jost Tags: Following the ACA Insurance and Coverage Payment Policy Source Type: blogs

Trump Is Right & His Critics Are Wrong: Let Consumers, Employers Buy Insurance Across States Lines
An important part of Donald Trump ’s health care agenda is his pledge to let consumers and employers avoid unwanted regulatory costs by purchasing insurance licensed by states other than their own, a change that would make health insurance both more affordable and more secure. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that allowing employers to avo id these unwanted regulatory costs would reduce premiums an average of 13 percent. That’s a nice contrast to what Bill Clinton calls ObamaCare’s “crazy system where…people [who] are out there busting it, sometimes 60 ho...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - December 8, 2016 Category: American Health Authors: Michael F. Cannon Source Type: blogs

Focus Like a Ninja: How to Reduce Stress and Sharpen Your Mind
You're reading Focus Like a Ninja: How to Reduce Stress and Sharpen Your Mind, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Our desire to be more focused, to produce more, to think better, and to find clarity in our lives is often attacked from the angle of looking at our mind and how our brains can be adjusted or medicated or sharpened in some way. But, the truth of the matter is, that as a culture, we are under a huge amount of stress that degrades the quality of our thinking and our lives and it simply can’...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - November 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: TheWellLife Tags: featured self improvement Briana Borten consciousness Dr. Peter Borten energy how to focus how to reduce stress mental health pickthebrain reduce anxiety The Well Life The Well Life book Source Type: blogs

Acupuncture: Getting the point
I’ve frequently written about what I like to refer to as “quackademic medicine,” defined as the infiltration of outright quackery into medical academia, particularly medical schools and academic medical centers. There’s no doubt that it’s a significant problem as hallowed institutions like Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center embrace nonsense, pseudoscience, and quackery in the name of… (Source: Respectful Insolence)
Source: Respectful Insolence - November 17, 2016 Category: Surgery Authors: Orac Tags: Clinical trials Complementary and alternative medicine Pseudoscience Quackery Skepticism/critical thinking Sports acupuncture EXPERIENCE L!FE qi quackademic medicine Selene Yeager traditional Chinese medicine Source Type: blogs

What exactly is cupping?
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling The 2016 summer Olympics had its share of exciting performances, upsets, and photo finishes. But for days after Michael Phelps’s first appearance at the games, it seemed all anyone could talk about was “cupping.” It’s an ancient therapy that left multiple circular discolorations on his skin. During “dry cupping,” suction is applied to the skin for several minutes; sometimes it is combined with massage, acupuncture, or other alternative therapies. (“Wet cupping” is similar except that blood is removed by making small cuts in the skin.) Cuppin...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - September 30, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Robert H. Shmerling, MD Tags: Complementary and alternative medicine Source Type: blogs