Coinfection of tuberculosis and COVID-19 limits the ability to in vitro respond to SARS-CoV-2

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimated in 2019, 10 million tuberculosis (TB) cases with 1.6 million deaths worldwide (WHO, 2020a). Lung is the most frequent TB localization, but any organ can be affected (Goletti et al., 2018). Since 2020, COronaVIrus Disease-2019 (COVID-19) caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome –CoronaVirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) spread globally with around 111 million cases reported (WHO, 2020b). There is evidence, that COVID-19 pandemic worsened TB epidemic globally due to TB-services fragmentation and additional pressures on health systems by COVID-19 resulting in weakening of the National TB programs (Migliori et al., 2020).
Source: International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Category: Infectious Diseases Authors: Source Type: research

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You don’t want to be a virus in Dr. David Ho’s lab. Pretty much every day since the COVID-19 pandemic began, Ho and his team have done nothing but find ways to stress SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease. His goal: pressure the virus relentlessly enough that it mutates to survive, so drug developers can understand how the virus might respond to new treatments. As a virologist with decades of experience learning about another obstinate virus, HIV, Ho knows just how to apply that mutation-generating stress, whether by starving the virus, bathing it in antibodies that disrupt its ability to infect cells, ...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Genetics Magazine Source Type: news
Chemosphere. 2021 Jul;274:129900. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2021.129900. Epub 2021 Feb 9.ABSTRACTThe burden of the human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) infection has transformed the African continent into a major consumer of antiretrovirals (ARVs) drugs. In addition to HIV burden, the African continent has also a high incidence of tuberculosis (TB) and has been experiencing recurring outbreaks of several other viral, bacterial, and parasitic epidemic diseases. The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-COV-2 or Covid-19) pandemic outbreak is adding to the cont...
Source: Chemosphere - Category: Chemistry Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Although this work clearly demonstrates that during the first wave of the pandemic, fewer infections were reported worldwide in countries where BCG vaccination is obligatory, however, the causal relationship is uncertain, as the countries' past, customs, social organization and economic development are different. Our results support the necessity of comparative contact tracing to clarify how BCG vaccination affects people's susceptibility to this new type of coronavirus as well as their ability to spread and transmit the virus. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(4): 123-134.PMID:33486464 | DOI:10.1556/650.2021.32107
Source: Orvosi Hetilap - Category: General Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
CONCLUSION: Although this work clearly demonstrates that during the first wave of the pandemic, fewer infections were reported worldwide in countries where BCG vaccination is obligatory, however, the causal relationship is uncertain, as the countries' past, customs, social organization and economic development are different. Our results support the necessity of comparative contact tracing to clarify how BCG vaccination affects people's susceptibility to this new type of coronavirus as well as their ability to spread and transmit the virus. Orv Hetil. 2021; 162(4): 123-134. PMID: 33486464 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Orvosi Hetilap - Category: General Medicine Authors: Tags: Orv Hetil Source Type: research
We present advances in modeling techniques that have led to fundamental disease discoveries and impacted clinical translation.Recent FindingsCombining mechanistic models and machine learning algorithms has led to improvements in the treatment ofShigella and tuberculosis through the development of novel compounds. Modeling of the epidemic dynamics of malaria at the within-host and between-host level has afforded the development of more effective vaccination and antimalarial therapies. Similarly, in-host and host-host models have supported the development of new HIV treatment modalities and an improved understanding of the i...
Source: Current Pathobiology Reports - Category: Laboratory Medicine Source Type: research
Conclusion The story of COVID-19 contact tracing is still in progress, and it’s not clear whether the ending will be success or failure. We hope that this essay has added depth to the opening words “Contact tracing for COVID-19 will be the most complex health investigation ever”. Vince Kuraitis, JD/MBA (@VinceKuraitis) is an independent healthcare strategy consultant with over 30 years’ experience across 150+ healthcare organizations. He blogs at e-CareManagement.com. Eric D. Perakslis, PhD (@eperakslis) is a Rubenstein Fellow at Duke University. Deven McGraw , JD, MPH, LLM (@h...
Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: COVID-19 Health Policy The Health Data Goldilocks Dilemma: Sharing? Privacy? Both? Deven McGraw Eric Perakslis Vince Kuraitis Source Type: blogs
In the coronavirus era, a host of epidemiological terms have entered common public use. There’s the now-ubiquitous “social distancing,” and the newly politicized “flatten the curve.” And as states and local governments seek a way out of lockdowns that have brought their economies to a near-standstill, “contact tracing” has made its way into everyday conversation as well. But what exactly is contact tracing, and how can it help society battle the COVID-19 epidemic? Here, the basics of the time-tested public health strategy, and the hopes for its use in the coronavirus pandemic: Wh...
Source: TIME: Science - Category: Science Authors: Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news
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