Emergency department targeted screening for hepatitis C does not improve linkage to care.

CONCLUSION: Targeted high-risk screening in the emergency department identified undiagnosed and untreated HCV carriers, but did not improve treatment rates. Other strategies need to be developed to improve linkage to care in high risk populations. PMID: 32921964 [PubMed - in process]
Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology : WJG - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: World J Gastroenterol Source Type: research

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Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a public health crisis and the most common chronic liver disease in the US with a current prevalence of 25% in US adults and rising.1-3 NAFLD results from the accumulation of fat within hepatocytes in patients without a history of heavy alcohol use or other causes (e.g., medication, hepatitis C). NAFLD is a spectrum of disease ranging from simple steatosis (NAFL) to steatohepatitis (NASH), fibrosis, and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with risk for hepatocellular carcinoma, need for liver transplantation, type 2 diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and cardiovascula...
Source: Accident and Emergency Nursing - Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Tags: Acad Emerg Med Source Type: research
Conclusions: While there is a certain overlap between the results of the current study and published transcriptomic profiles of non-transplanted livers with steatosis, we have identified discrete characteristics of the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in liver grafts potentially utilizable for the establishment of predictive signature. Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in industrialized countries, its prevalence being estimated at 19–31.3% (1). It encompasses a range of conditions that are thought to arise from fatty liver (simple steatosis) throu...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) because of a significant survival benefit conferred compared to patients who remain on haemodialysis.1 Although the prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in patients with ESRD has significantly declined over time, it remains at least 4-times higher than in the general population.2,3 Chronic HCV or HBV infection can result in chronic liver disease, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma4 –6 and increase the risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD).
Source: Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Research Article Source Type: research
Abstract Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is the most common cause of infection related deaths in USA according to Central Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report in 2016. Hepatitis C is a blood borne virus and is common in chronic kidney disease (CKD) and in hemodialysis (HD) dependent patients. A majority of patients with CHC could remain asymptomatic and are still undiagnosed. Early detection of CHC and linkage of infected patients to care for evaluation and treatment is the standard of care as emphasized by Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome (KDIGO) and American Association for the Study of Liver Disease- In...
Source: Seminars in Dialysis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Semin Dial Source Type: research
Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is not only an important cause of chronic liver disease, but extrahepatic manifestations are common and include chronic kidney disease (CKD). HCV is classically associated with cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis in the context of mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome, but other glomerular diseases also occur and may be significantly under-recognized. HCV may cause glomerular disease by immune complex deposition; however, other potential mechanisms by which HCV promotes CKD include a direct cytopathic effect of the virus on renal tissue, and by its association with accelerated ...
Source: Seminars in Dialysis - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: Semin Dial Source Type: research
AbstractHepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is now considered a systemic disease due to the occurrence of extra-hepatic manifestations. Among these, the renal involvement is frequent. HCV infection, in fact, is strongly associated with proteinuria and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and negatively affects the prognosis of renal patients. In the last few years, availability of more specific and effective drugs against HCV has dramatically changed the clinical course of this disease. These drugs may provide further advantages in the CKD population as a whole by reducing progression of renal disease, mortality rate and by increasi...
Source: Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
the Liver (AISF), Italian Society of Infectious and Tropical Disease (SIMIT), Italian Society of Internal Medicine (SIMI) Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is now considered a systemic disease due to the occurrence of extra-hepatic manifestations. Among these, the renal involvement is frequent. HCV infection, in fact, is strongly associated with proteinuria and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and negatively affects the prognosis of renal patients. In the last few years, availability of more specific and effective drugs against HCV has dramatically changed the clinical course of this disease. These drugs may ...
Source: Journal of Nephrology - Category: Urology & Nephrology Authors: Tags: J Nephrol Source Type: research
AbstractHepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is now considered a systemic disease due to the occurrence of extra-hepatic manifestations. Among these, the renal involvement is frequent. HCV infection, in fact, is strongly associated with proteinuria and chronic kidney disease (CKD) and negatively affects the prognosis of renal patients. In the last few years, availability of more specific and effective drugs against HCV has dramatically changed the clinical course of this disease. These drugs may provide further advantages in the CKD population as a whole by reducing progression of renal disease, mortality rate and by increasi...
Source: Infection - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Maged H Hussein, Musthafa Chalikandy Peedikayil, Zamir Ahmed Zamir, Abdulrahman AlfaddaAnnals of Thoracic Medicine 2018 13(2):117-121 Hepatic hydrothorax (HH) is a transudative pleural effusion that complicates advanced liver cirrhosis. Cases refractory to medical treatment in the form of salt restriction and diuretics are labeled refractory hepatic hydrothorax (RHH) and may require transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (TIPSS) or even liver transplantation. Renal impairment is common in advanced liver disease, worsens its prognosis, and makes the management of HH more challenging. Successful antiviral therapy re...
Source: Annals of Thoracic Medicine - Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Authors: Cholongitas E, Pipili C, Papatheodoridis GV Abstract Treatment of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) differs from that used in the general CHC population mostly when glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is below 30 mL/min, as sofosbuvir, the backbone of several current regimens, is officially contraindicated. Given that ribavirin free regimens are preferable in CKD, elbasvir/grazoprevir is offered in CHC patients with genotype 1 or 4 and ombitasvir/paritaprevir and dasabuvir in genotype 1b for 12 wk. Although regimens containing peginterferon with or without ribavirin are ...
Source: World Journal of Hepatology - Category: Gastroenterology Tags: World J Hepatol Source Type: research
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