The year in review: advances in interventional cardiology in 2019

Purpose of review Major studies in interventional cardiology in 2019 have added substantial new evidence for pharmaco-invasive management of coronary artery disease. The review highlights the main findings of a selection of these trials and summarizes their impact on clinical practice. Recent findings Recent randomized studies examining the efficacy of revascularization or medical treatment in stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD), treatment of acute coronary syndromes, emerging interventional devices, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, and intravascular imaging and physiology guidance have substantially advanced the evidenced-based knowledge in interventional cardiology. Summary Patients with SIHD and at least moderate myocardial ischemia have similar event-free survival after an initial conservative strategy of optimal medical therapy versus an upfront invasive strategy. Quality of life and angina-free status are significantly improved with revascularization. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and coronary artery bypass grafting provide similar 5-year outcomes in patients with left main coronary artery disease and low or intermediate disease complexity. An initially conservative management is equally effective as an early invasive approach in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest without ongoing ischemia. Patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel disease benefit from staged complete revascularization after primary PCI. Post-PCI, p...
Source: Current Opinion in Cardiology - Category: Cardiology Tags: CLINICAL TRIALS: Edited by Neal S. Kleiman Source Type: research

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Now that marijuana is legal for medical or recreational use in many states, growing numbers of Americans — including older people — are imbibing this popular drug. In fact, the percentage of people ages 65 and older who said they used some form of marijuana almost doubled between 2015 and 2018, a recent study reports. Compared with prescription drugs, the health consequences of using marijuana are not nearly as well studied. But converging evidence suggests that the drug may be harmful for the heart, according to a review article in JACC: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. More than two million Amer...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Heart Health Marijuana Source Type: blogs
AbstractChronic heart failure (HF) is rare in the young and common in the elderly in the Western world. HF in the young is usually due to specific causes, predominantly or exclusively affecting the heart (adult congenital heart disease, different types of cardiomyopathies, myocarditis, or cardiotoxicity). In contrast, the mechanisms underlying HF development in the elderly have not been completely delineated. We propose that in most elderly patients, HF, regardless of the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), is the consequence of the acceleration of cardiovascular aging by specific risk factors (usually hypertension,...
Source: Heart Failure Reviews - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
In conclusion, careful monitoring of patients in the early stages of CKD would result in lower morbidity and mortality. These objectives can be achieved by implementing screening programs and early interventions. PMID: 32509001 [PubMed]
Source: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine - Category: General Medicine Tags: Exp Ther Med Source Type: research
Authors: Lehto HR, Pietilä A, Niiranen TJ, Lommi J, Salomaa V Abstract Aims: To compare diabetic patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) needing revascularization to corresponding non-diabetic patients in terms of revascularization methods, comorbidities and urgency of procedure. We also examined the impact of patient characteristics and comorbidities on the revascularization method.Methods: We identified all diabetic (n = 33,018) and non-diabetic (n = 106,224) patients with first-ever, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) from electr...
Source: Annals of Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Tags: Ann Med Source Type: research
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs
RARITAN, N.J., March 20, 2020 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson &Johnson announced today that it will unveil late-breaking data from its leading cardiovascular and metabolism portfolio during the virtual American College of Cardiology’s 69th Annual Scientific Session together with the World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC) on March 28-30, 2020. Notably, four late-breaking abstracts for XARELTO® (rivaroxaban) will be presented, including data from the Phase 3 VOYAGER PAD study in patients with symptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) after lower-extremity revascularization.Click to ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news
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Source: The Health Care Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Medical Practice Patients afib atrial fibrillation cardiac care irregular heartbeat Kousik Krishnan Source Type: blogs
and Stroke Nursing; Council on Clinical Cardiology; and Stroke Council Abstract Epidemiological and biological plausibility studies support a cause-and-effect relationship between increased levels of physical activity or cardiorespiratory fitness and reduced coronary heart disease events. These data, plus the well-documented anti-aging effects of exercise, have likely contributed to the escalating numbers of adults who have embraced the notion that "more exercise is better." As a result, worldwide participation in endurance training, competitive long distance endurance events, and high-intensity interva...
Source: Circulation - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Circulation Source Type: research
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Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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