Drug treatment strategies for osteoporosis in stroke patients.

Drug treatment strategies for osteoporosis in stroke patients. Expert Opin Pharmacother. 2020 Mar 09;: Authors: Hsieh CY, Sung SF, Huang HK Abstract Introduction: Osteoporosis and subsequent fractures are well-recognized complications of stroke. However, drug treatment strategies for osteoporosis after stroke have been rarely discussed in the current guidelines for the management of stroke or osteoporosis.Areas covered: The authors review the epidemiology, characteristics, pathophysiology, and risk prediction of post-stroke osteoporosis and fractures. Then they provide an overview of existing evidence regarding drug treatment strategies for osteoporosis in stroke patients. They also review the effects on bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures for those drugs commonly used in stroke patients.Expert opinion: Currently, there is scarce evidence. A small randomized control trial suggested that a single use of 4 mg of intravenous zoledronate within 5 weeks of stroke onset was beneficial for preserving BMD, while simultaneous use of calcium and vitamin D supplements may be effective in preventing hypocalcemia. Further studies are needed to address several important issues of post-stroke osteoporosis, including who (the eligibility for treatment), when (the best timing of treatment), what (which drug), and how long (the best duration of treatment). On the other hand, physicians should bear in mind that drugs commonly used for stroke, such as statins or warfari...
Source: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Tags: Expert Opin Pharmacother Source Type: research

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In this study, there was no increased risk of adverse outcomes (including muscle aches, liver dysfunction, new onset of diabetes, cancer, and bleeding strokes), even when LDL was lowered to as low as 20 mg/dL. Although statin medications themselves have been linked to side effects, especially at high doses, it appears that extremely low LDL concentrations are not responsible for side effects. In other words, lowering LDL beyond our previous target of 70 mg/dL appears to be not only safe but beneficial, in patients with CVD. The post LDL cholesterol: How low can you (safely) go? appeared first on Harvard Health Blog.
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Drugs and Supplements Health Heart Health Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Ryan R. Kelly1,2†, Lindsay T. McDonald1,2†, Nathaniel R. Jensen1,2, Sara J. Sidles1,2 and Amanda C. LaRue1,2* 1Research Services, Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center, Charleston, SC, United States 2Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, United States The significant biochemical and physiological effects of psychological stress are beginning to be recognized as exacerbating common diseases, including osteoporosis. This review discusses the current evidence for psychological stress-associated mental health disorders as risk factors for os...
Source: Frontiers in Psychiatry - Category: Psychiatry Source Type: research
Could daily doses of statins help prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures after a stroke?Journal of Clinical Endocrinology &Metabolism
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Diabetes & Endocrinology Journal Article Source Type: news
Patients diagnosed with a stroke and treated with statins may be at less risk of developing osteoporosis, according to research published in theJournal of Clinical Endocrinology& Metabolism.Neurology Advisor
Source: Society for Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news
Publication date: Available online 19 May 2018Source: Joint Bone SpineAuthor(s): Clément Prati, Céline Demougeot, Xavier Guillot, Maxime Sondag, Frank Verhoeven, Daniel WendlingAbstractAnkylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease that involves the entheses, causing inflammatory pain and functional impairments. Patients may experience extraarticular manifestations such as uveitis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. These, together with the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis and the development of spinal fusion, are the main determinants of adverse disease o...
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
Abstract Context: Post-stroke osteoporosis and consequent fracture increase the risk of morbidity and mortality and cause considerable socioeconomic burden. Objective: To evaluate the association between statin use and risks of osteoporosis and fracture in stroke patients. Design: Population-based propensity score-matched cohort study. Setting: National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. Patients: Patients newly diagnosed with a stroke, between 2000 and 2012, were identified. After propensity score matching, 5,254 patients were included, with 2,627 patients in the statin and non-stat...
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
Publication date: Available online 19 May 2018 Source:Joint Bone Spine Author(s): Clément Prati, Céline Demougeot, Xavier Guillot, Maxime Sondag, Frank Verhoeven, Daniel Wendling Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory joint disease that involves the entheses, causing inflammatory pain and functional impairments. Patients may experience extraarticular manifestations such as uveitis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. These, together with the increased risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis and the development of spinal fusion, are the main determinants of adverse disease outcom...
Source: Joint Bone Spine - Category: Orthopaedics Source Type: research
We examined associations between mortality and accelerometer-measured PA using age-relevant intensity cutpoints in older women of various ethnicities. The results support the hypothesis that higher levels of accelerometer-measured PA, even when below the moderate-intensity threshold recommended in current guidelines, are associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality in women aged 63 to 99. Our findings expand on previous studies showing that higher self-reported PA reduces mortality in adults aged 60 and older, specifically in older women, and at less than recommended amounts. Moreover, our findings challenge th...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, KPE delays intrinsic skin aging process by inhibiting cellular senescence and mitochondrial dysfunction. KPE does not only attenuate cellular senescence through inhibition of the p53/p21, p16/pRb, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways but also improve mitochondrial biogenesis through PGC-1α stimulation. Consequently, KPE prevents wrinkle formation, skin atrophy, and loss of elasticity by increasing collagen and elastic fibers in hairless mice. The Society for the Rescue of our Elders https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2017/08/the-society-for-the-rescue-of-our-elders/ The Society for the...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
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