Optimal Laxatives for Oral Colonoscopy Bowel Preparation: from High-volume to Novel Low-volume Solutions.

[Optimal Laxatives for Oral Colonoscopy Bowel Preparation: from High-volume to Novel Low-volume Solutions]. Korean J Gastroenterol. 2020 Feb 25;75(2):65-73 Authors: Na SY, Moon W Abstract Optimal bowel preparation is essential for a more accurate, comfortable, and safe colonoscopy. The majority of postcolonoscopy colorectal cancers can be explained by procedural factors, mainly missed polyps or inadequate examination. Therefore the most important goal of optimal bowel preparation is to reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer. Although adequate preparation should be achieved in 85-90% or more of all colonoscopy as a quality indicator, unfortunately 20-30% shows inadequate preparation. Laxatives for oral colonoscopy bowel preparation can be classified into polyethylene glycol (PEG)-electrolyte lavage solution, osmotic laxatives, stimulant laxatives, and divided into high-volume solution (≥3 L) and low-volume solution (
Source: Korean J Gastroenter... - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Korean J Gastroenterol Source Type: research

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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Cancer Research - Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Oral abstract Source Type: research
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