Baby girl's cancerous tumour engulfs her mouth
Ainul Mardhiah Ahmad Safiuddin, nine months, is due to travel from her home in the state constituency of Ayer Molek, in south-western Malacca State, Malaysia, to London for treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tennis star Nicole Gibbs withdraws from French Open after dentist spotted a rare cancer in her mouth
Nicole Gibbs, 26, was at a routine dentist's appointment last month when the doctor spotted a growth on the roof her mouth, which was soon discovered to be salivary gland cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer warning - do your gums look like this? The hidden signs in your mouth
CANCER symptoms vary depending on which part of the body is affected by a tumour. You could be at risk of deadly leukaemia if you notice this hidden sign in your mouth. Do your gums look like this? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

13.05.19: Not intended for U.S. and UK Media - 2019 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting:
Bayer to present new data at ASCO 2019 highlighting commitment to evolve cancer treatment paradigmData from Bayer's growing oncology portfolio include new analyses on the company's precision oncology treatment larotrectinib, with two oral presentations in patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK gene fusion: one on expanded data in pediatric patients and the other one in patients with brain metastases or primary central nervous system tumors / First detailed presentation of quality of life data from the Phase III ARAMIS trial of the investigational androgen receptor antagonist darolutamide in patients with non-metast...
Source: Bayer IR Newsfeed: Events - May 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bayer to present new data at ASCO 2019 highlighting commitment to evolve cancer treatment paradigm (for specialized target groups only)
Data from Bayer’s growing oncology portfolio include new analyses on the company’s precision oncology treatment larotrectinib, with two oral presentations in patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK gene fusion: one on expanded data in pediatric patients and the other one in patients with brain metastases or primary central nervous system tumors / First detailed presentation of quality of life data from the Phase III ARAMIS trial of the investigational androgen receptor antagonist darolutamide in patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer / Oral presentation on investigational ATR i...
Source: Bayer Company News - May 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Changing Patterns of HPV Oral Cancer in US White Men Changing Patterns of HPV Oral Cancer in US White Men
Incidence rates are slowing in younger white men, while they are rapidly increasing in those aged 60 years and older.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - May 8, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Teaching by Touch
The devices and tools used by medical professionals today certainly appear a lot different than from just a short time ago. In general, medical professionals—and their patients—have become much more accepting of smart, data-driven medical technologies that streamline and improve the accuracy of a treatment process. Wearable therapeutic and drug-delivery devices, robotic surgical systems, and telehealth monitoring devices represent some of the many recent advancements that have changed the medical device industry for the better. However, even with the introduction ofÂ&nb...
Source: MDDI - May 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Rob Podoloff and  Andy Dambeck Tags: Design Source Type: news

Could mouth rinse to detect HPV DNA be associated with predicting risk of head/neck cancer recurrence, death?
This study included 396 adults with head and neck squamous cell cancer of the mouth or throat, of which 202 patients had HPV-positive cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opting In: The Value of Vaccines
A young boy in Pakistan receives an oral polio vaccine (OPV). Over the last 30 years huge progress has been made against polio and it is now only endemic in 2 countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan, with only 33 cases confirmed cases last year. Credit: Ashfaq Yusufzai/IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, May 1 2019 (IPS) Since the introduction of vaccines, diseases such as measles and polio were quickly becoming a thing of the past. However, the world’s progress on immunisation is now being threatened. According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), 85 percent of the world’s children received basic va...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - May 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse North America Population Regional Categories TerraViva United Nations diptheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) human papillomavirus (HPV) Measles Vaccines World Health Organ Source Type: news

NIDCR Science News - April 2019
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. Nerve Cells that Feel the Itch Immune cells turn on itch sensory pathway NIDCR • April 30, 2019 Save the Date: Craniofacial Research Symposium On Monday, May 6, NIDCR will host a symposium, "Looking Back and Facing the Future: From NIDR to NIDCR"Learn more.   Dental Researchers Get at Root Causes of Cancer Patients’ Mouth Sores University of Connecticut • A...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 30, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Science News: Nerves feel the itch | Craniofacial research symposium
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. Nerve Cells that Feel the Itch Immune cells turn on itch sensory pathway NIDCR • April 30, 2019 Save the Date: Craniofacial Research Symposium On Monday, May 6, NIDCR will host a symposium, "Looking Back and Facing the Future: From NIDR to NIDCR"Learn more.   Dental Researchers Get at Root Causes of Cancer Patients’ Mouth Sores University of Connecticut • A...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 30, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Cancer Drug Recyclers Chosen for FDA Pilot Cancer Drug Recyclers Chosen for FDA Pilot
The Food and Drug Administration chose two small start-ups, which take unused oral chemotherapies and give them to patients who cannot afford them, to participate in a new pilot project.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - April 30, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Oral cancer detection by dentists is significantly on the rise
(University of Toronto - Faculty of Dentistry) After examining data gathered over an 11-year period in a first-of-its-kind provincial study, University of Toronto clinician-scientist Marco Magalhaes says that dentists in Ontario are detecting more cases of oral cancer and pre-cancer than ever before -- and it's saving lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 29, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Want to Live Longer? Science Says to Do These 5 Things
When it comes to staying healthy, most people have the same motivation: living as long and fulfilling a life as possible. And while science has yet to find a true fountain of youth, researchers have identified certain behaviors that can increase longevity. One study, published in the journal Circulation last year, even argued that adhering to just five healthy habits could extend your lifespan by roughly a decade. Here’s what they are, and what research to date says about living your longest life. Eating a healthy diet Diet is strongly linked to longevity. Research has long suggested that following a Mediterranean di...
Source: TIME: Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Longevity Source Type: news

DOACs Useful Alternative for Treating Cancer-Associated VTE DOACs Useful Alternative for Treating Cancer-Associated VTE
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) can be a safe alternative to low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) for treating cancer-associated venous thromboembolism (VTE), according to a new review.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - April 18, 2019 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Mouthwash Cuts Mucositis Pain, Enough to Make a Difference? Mouthwash Cuts Mucositis Pain, Enough to Make a Difference?
Oral rinse containing doxepin or the combination of diphenhydramine, lidocaine, and antacid may help reduce oral mucositis-related pain in head and neck cancer patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - April 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Why Spicy Food Makes Your Nose Run —and Why It’s Great for You
Munch a bit of habanero pepper or hot-sauce-soaked jambalaya, and you’ll notice a tingling numbness in your mouth followed by a burning sensation. If that burning sensation is sufficiently strong, your nose and eyes will start to run, and your mouth and throat will start to generate mucus. You may not be able to feel it, but your stomach and parts of your intestine will also start secreting excess fluid, says Dr. Brett Comer, a surgeon and ear, nose, and throat specialist at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Why does all this happen? Like spraying water on a filthy car, your body turns on the waterworks...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

After a cancer diagnosis at 30 'shook her world' this P.E.I. woman wants to spread hope
P.E.I. native Michelle Fuller was first diagnosed with cancer in 1999 at the age of 30, when she had surgery to remove her right eye, her cheekbone and part of the roof of her mouth. She's telling her story in a new book, A Fuller Life written by Sue Anne Linde. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/PEI Source Type: news

Comic-style information can better prepare surgical patients
Patients who received comic-style information better understood what the procedure entailed and were less anxious Related items fromOnMedica Sentinel node biopsy first to check spread of oral cancer GPs should be told when patients have cosmetic surgery Gastric banding has strong impact on cardio risks No safety evidence to back 8% of hip implants Placebo may not rely on deception (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 17, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Magic mouthwash effective treatment for mouth sore pain caused by radiation therapy
(Mayo Clinic) 'Magic mouthwash,' an oral rinse containing diphenhydramine, lidocaine and antacids, significantly reduced pain from oral mucositis, mouth sores, in patients receiving radiation therapy for cancers of the head and neck when compared to plaecbo. These were the findings of a multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial, led by Robert Miller, M.D., an emeritus Mayo Clinic radiation oncologist. Dr. Miller and his colleagues published their findings on Tuesday, April 16, in JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Oral cavity reconstruction: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
Surgery to treat oral cancers-- cancer of the mouth, tongue and jaw--can be disfuguring and affect the way you speak or eat. In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute,?Dr. Kevin Arce, an oral and maxillofacial surgeon at Mayo Clinic, discusses?reconstructive surgery for oral cancer patients. To listen, click the link below. Oral cavity reconstruction (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 16, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Magic Mouthwash effective treatment for mouth sore pain caused by radiation therapy
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- "Magic mouthwash," an oral rinse containing diphenhydramine, lidocaine and antacids, significantly reduced pain from oral mucositis, mouth sores, in patients receiving?radiation therapy for cancers of the head and neck when compared to placebo. These were the findings of a multi-institution, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial, led by Robert Miller, M.D., [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 16, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Discovery of oral cancer biomarkers could save thousands of lives
(University of Otago) Oral cancer is known for its high mortality rate in developing countries, but an international team of scientists hope its latest discovery will change that.Researchers from the University of Otago, New Zealand, and the Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), Kolkata, have discovered epigenetic markers that are distinctly different in oral cancer tissues compared to the adjacent healthy tissues in patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The HPV vaccine is important for preteens and teenagers. What about older women?
A doctor explores the pros and cons of a 45-year-old getting the shots against a disease that can cause cervical, oral and anal cancers. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Daphne Miller Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Do you need oral cancer screening?
Oral cancer screening Oral cancer screening is an examination performed by a dentist or other health care provider to look for signs of cancer or precancerous conditions in your mouth. Oral cancer screening detects mouth cancer or precancerous lesions that may lead to mouth cancer at an early stage, which is when cancer or lesions [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 12, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Cancer symptoms: The sign in your mouth that could indicate the deadly disease
CANCER symptoms can be subtle and are worryingly often confused with other, less serious conditions. That ’s why it’s important to be aware of any unexplained changes to your body. One symptom of some types of cancer which is not easily recognised, can be detected in the mouth. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medtronic touts new targeted drug delivery study results
Targeted drug delivery and conventional medical management have shown to have a reduction in healthcare use and costs for cancer patients in comparison to conventional medical management alone, according to a new study from Medtronic. The study found that there were significant cost savings to payers and fewer inpatient visits with shorter inpatient stays. It also showed that there were fewer emergency department visits for people who used targeted drug delivery (TDD) and conventional medical management (CMM). Medtronic suggests that TDD therapy had a significant average overall cost savings of $63,498 with fewer opioid pr...
Source: Mass Device - April 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Pain Management Medtronic Source Type: news

Study: Eating a handful of dark-colored berries can help prevent tooth decay
(Natural News) Berries are widely known as one of the best cancer-fighting foods, but did you know that they can also prevent tooth decay? A study published in the European Journal of Oral Sciences suggested that eating a handful of dark-colored berries, such as cranberries and blueberries, provide a protective effect against tooth decay. For... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Meisser Madera
Cochrane is made up of  13,000 members and over 50,000 supporters come from more than 130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.  Many  of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane ...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - April 3, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

Birth Control Pills May Protect Against Most Serious Ovarian Cancer: Study
WEDNESDAY, April 3, 2019 -- The protection that birth control pills offer against ovarian cancer is strongest with the most aggressive forms of the disease, a new study says. For several years, researchers have noted that women who have used oral... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 3, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Poor oral health may increase the risk of pancreatic cancer among African American women
(Boston University School of Medicine) African American women with poor oral health may be more likely to get pancreatic cancer (PC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New class of membranes shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis
Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of heart disease and Alzheimer ’s disease. A team of UCLA researchers has developed methods that may lead to more effective and reliable therapy for periodontal disease — ones that promote gum tissue and bone regeneration with biological and mechanical features that can be adjusted based on treatment needs. Thestudy is published online in ACS Nano. Periodontitis is a chronic, destructive dise...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - March 25, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Here ’s Everything You Need to Know About Gut Health
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

New class of membranes shown to regenerate tissue and bone, viable solution for periodontitis
Periodontitis affects nearly half of Americans ages 30 and older, and in its advanced stages, it could lead to early tooth loss or worse. Recent studies have shown that periodontitis could also increase risk of  heart disease and Alzheimer’s disease.A team of UCLA researchers has developed methods that may lead to more effective and reliable therapy for periodontal disease — ones that promote gum tissue and bone regeneration with biological and mechanical features that can be adjusted based on treatment needs. Thestudy is published online in ACS Nano.Periodontitis is a chronic, destructive diseas...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 22, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

High-fructose corn syrup enhances intestinal tumor growth in mice
Excessive consumption of beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is associated with obesity and with an increased risk of colorectal cancer. Whether HFCS contributes directly to tumorigenesis is unclear. We investigated the effects of daily oral administration of HFCS in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutant mice, which are predisposed to develop intestinal tumors. The HFCS-treated mice showed a substantial increase in tumor size and tumor grade in the absence of obesity and metabolic syndrome. HFCS increased the concentrations of fructose and glucose in the intestinal lumen and serum, respectively, and ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Goncalves, M. D., Lu, C., Tutnauer, J., Hartman, T. E., Hwang, S.-K., Murphy, C. J., Pauli, C., Morris, R., Taylor, S., Bosch, K., Yang, S., Wang, Y., Van Riper, J., Lekaye, H. C., Roper, J., Kim, Y., Chen, Q., Gross, S. S., Rhee, K. Y., Cantley, L. C., Y Tags: Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Got cancer? Same company that manufactured Vietnam War's Agent Orange and Holocaust's poisonous gas makes deadly American medicine and food
(Natural News) “How could this have happened to me?” Those are usually the first words out of someone’s mouth when they find out from an oncologist that they have some form of cancer. “I’m a good person.” “I don’t deserve this.” “Maybe it’s genetic.” One of those perplexing statements usually follows next. Most Americans simply... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

SGO 2019: Pembrolizumab Combo Shows Clinical Benefit for Recurrent Epithelial Ovarian Cancer
Results of a phase II trial evaluating pembrolizumab in combination with bevacizumab and oral metronomic cyclophosphamide were presented at SGO 2019. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Christina Bennett, MS Source Type: news

Joanne battles stage 4 kidney cancer
Four years ago, Joanne Romero, who lives in Texas, was diagnosed with stage 4 kidney cancer when she was 26 weeks pregnant. Despite her challenges, Joanne remains positive and hopes her story serves as an inspiration to others.   My journey began on Feb. 16, 2015. I was currently 26 weeks pregnant. I was experiencing a cough that continued to get worse. That day, I was scheduled to have a lung procedure to see what was causing the cough. My high-risk OB ordered an ultrasound the night before. She wanted to make sure my baby was doing well enough for the procedure. During the ultrasound, the ultrasound tech a...
Source: Kidney Cancer Association - March 18, 2019 Category: Urology & Nephrology Source Type: news

US Launches First National Firefighter Cancer Registry
The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has launched the first nationwide Firefighter Cancer Registry, linking workplace exposures to deadly malignancies such as mesothelioma. Officials administering the study believe the registry will help reduce the incidence of various cancers for firefighters. “A national registry will go a long way toward answering the many questions still out there,” Dr. Kenny Fent, an industrial hygienist at NIOSH who is leading the effort, told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “We’re just laying the groundwork now, but in the long run, we want to h...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 18, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Oral bacteria in pancreas linked to more aggressive tumours
(Karolinska Institutet) The presence of oral bacteria in so-called cystic pancreatic tumours is associated with the severity of the tumour, a study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in the journal Gut reports. It is hoped that the results can help to improve diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CASSINI Trial Assesses Rivaroxaban for Thromboprophylaxis in Cancer Patients
In a phase IIIb trial, researchers evaluated the efficacy of an oral anticoagulant in cancer patients  at high risk for venous thromboembolism. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 13, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Christina Bennett, MS Source Type: news

Chest CT May Be Better Than PET/CT for HNSCC Distant Metastasis Evaluation
MONDAY, March 11, 2019 -- As distant metastasis (DM) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a rare event, computed tomography of the chest may be more cost-effective for evaluation, according to a study recently published in Oral... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - March 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

How Common Is Unintentional Cannabis Ingestion?
Discussion “[Cannabis] is a genus of flowering plant with three main varieties: sativa, indica and ruderalis.” It has been used for hundreds of years for hemp or fiber and also for psychoactive and medicinal effects. The active compounds are collectively called cannabinoids, of which delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) are the most abundant. The floral buds or calyxes of the plant have the most cannabinoids, but other parts of the plant are also used such as leaves. Hash oil, hashish (or resin) and marijuana (dried leaves) are the common products from strongest to least strongest products. ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - March 11, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How do oral bacteria make colorectal cancer more aggressive?
The common oral bacterium F. nucleatum hastens the aggressiveness of colorectal cancer by promoting the growth of cells that are already cancerous. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Colorectal Cancer Source Type: news

Tooth decay may make colon cancer more aggressive
The findings by Columbia University add to the growing swell of research that show oral health may be linked to much, much more than just the look and smell of our teeth. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a common oral bacteria makes colon cancer more deadly
(Columbia University Irving Medical Center) Researchers have determined how a type of bacteria commonly found in the mouth accelerates the growth of colon cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 4, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NIDCR Science News - February 2019
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. Bacteria that Glide with the Greatest of Ease How oral bacteria build microbial communities NIDCR • February 28, 2019 Light-Based Technologies in Dentistry UCSF's Daniel Fried explores noninvasive imaging & laser-based treatments NIH • February 22, 2019 New Open-Source Bioinformatics Tool Identifies Factors Responsible for DiseasesBoston University • February 20, 2019 E-...
Source: NIDCR Science News - February 28, 2019 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

What if Google or Amazon Designed Clinical Trials? What if Google or Amazon Designed Clinical Trials?
We need'smarter'trial targeting, says Dr Perry Wilson, as seen in recent studies of oral anticoagulants in cancer patients.Medscape (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Oral Duvelisib Potential New Option for Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
The DYNAMO study demonstrated that the oral PI3K gamma inhibitor duvelisib produced an overall response rate in patients with heavily pretreated indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - February 26, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Source Type: news