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Heavy Drinking May Change the Bacteria In Your Mouth and Raise Gum Disease Risk
There’s still quite a bit scientists don’t know about the microbiome: the vast collection of microorganisms living within your body. What is becoming increasingly clear, however, is that your lifestyle habits, from the foods you eat to the medications you take, may influence these bacterial colonies. Even drinking seems to have an effect. A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Microbiome, finds that drinking alcohol may alter some of the approximately 700 types of bacteria in your mouth — and probably not for the better. The study finds that alcohol may give rise to strains of oral bacteria that ar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Just one alcoholic beverage per day raise risks of mouth cancer
A New York University study revealed that people who drank one or more alcoholic beverage per day had an excess of harmful oral bacteria and a drought of healthy bacteria to fight off harmful strains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Just one alcoholic beverage per day raise risks of mouth cancer, gum disease and heart disease  
A New York University study revealed that people who drank one or more alcoholic beverage per day had an excess of harmful oral bacteria and a drought of healthy bacteria to fight off harmful strains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking affects mouth bacteria linked to diseases
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) When compared with nondrinkers, men and women who had one or more alcoholic drinks per day had an overabundance of oral bacteria linked to gum disease, some cancers, and heart disease. By contrast, drinkers had fewer bacteria known to check the growth of other, harmful germs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Oral health outshines relationship with friends in Delta Dental survey
Most Americans view oral health as important to their life and overall health in well-being national surveyOAK BROOK, Ill.,April 17, 2018 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Proper oral health is crucial to a healthy life, according to a recent national survey from Delta Dental. The results reveal that more adults say their oral health (85 percent) is important to their life than their diet or nutrition (71 percent), relationship with friends (71 percent), or weight (71 percent).Making a health connectionThe Delta Dental survey shows that most adults (85 percent) recognize their oral health is important to their overall health...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - April 20, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Black raspberries can reduce your risk of developing oral cancer
(Natural News) A study on black raspberries and mouth tumors on experimental animals revealed that these berries can inhibit oral cancer, reported an article in the American Institute for Cancer Research website. The researchers also discovered cancer-related genes that could help explain its actions. Dr. Steve Oghumu, Ph.D., the lead author of the study and a scientist... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Roche to present data on TECENTRIQ (Atezolizumab) and data from across its cancer immunotherapy portfolio at the 2018 American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting
Roche today announced that it will present data from across its broad cancer immunotherapy development programme, including approved and investigational medicines, during the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting from 14 April to 18 April in Chicago, IL, United States. More than 42 abstracts have been accepted, including five “late breakers” and seven oral presentations. (Source: Roche Investor Update)
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Why do my gums look white?
White spots on the gums have many causes. These include mild conditions such as mouth ulcers but could also be a sign of more severe conditions, which could potentially include cancer. White spots on the gums may cause pain or other symptoms Treatment depends on the cause. Learn more about white spots on the gums here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dentistry Source Type: news

5 Trends Medtech Should Be Talking About
Recently I chatted with Candace Roulo, managing editor of Advanced Manufacturing Now, about some of the most important trends in medtech and the technologies that are taking the industry to the next level. Click below to listen to the podcast, or read on for select highlights of the conversation – what I consider to be five trends medtech professionals should be talking about. 128-Advanced_Manufacturing_Now-UBM.mp3 Explore all of these trends in depth at the BIOMEDevice Boston Conference and Expo, April 18-19, 2018. Use promo code "SAVE100" for $100 off conference registration and f...
Source: MDDI - April 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: BIOMEDevice Boston Business Digital Health Source Type: news

An Alternative to Dalteparin for Cancer-Related VTE An Alternative to Dalteparin for Cancer-Related VTE
Dr David Kerr discusses a promising new study suggesting that oral edoxaban may be substituted for daily subcutaneous dalteparin in cancer patients who have had a venous thromboembolism.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

In case you missed the ‘condom-snorting challenge’ — and didn’t know it’s a bad idea
Imagine uncoiling a condom and stuffing it up one side of your nose, then plugging the other nostril and inhaling until the long piece of latex slides into your throat. Then what? You reach back and pull it from your mouth. Why would someone do that? Apparently for the same reason young people have dared each other to […]Related:Coffee must carry cancer warning, California judge rulesIn emotional speech, CDC’s new leader vows to uphold science‘Our greatest fear’: Highly drug-resistant gonorrhea confirmed by health officials (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Interventions for preventing oral mucositis in patients with cancer receiving treatment: cytokines and growth factors
This review concludes that keratinocyte growth factor is beneficial in the prevention of oral mucositis in adults who are receiving radiotherapy to the head and neck with cisplatin or fluorouracil, or chemotherapy alone for mixed solid and haematological cancers. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - March 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boys Still Aren ’t Getting the HPV Vaccine As Much As Girls, Study Says
When the HPV vaccine first hit the U.S. market in 2006, it was approved only for girls. Boys got the green light three years later — but a new study suggests there’s still a gender gap in vaccination rates. The HPV vaccine — administered in either two or three doses — protects against human papillomavirus, a common sexually transmitted disease that can lead to cervical, vaginal, anal, penile, mouth and throat cancers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that all children get the vaccine when they’re 11 or 12 years old, though it’s approved for use in people up...
Source: TIME: Health - March 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Many Doctors Don't Push HPV Shots To Boys
HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that can cause cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, mouth and throat cancers. The HPV vaccine is recommended as a routine childhood vaccination. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - March 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Janssen Announces U.S. FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Erdafitinib in the Treatment of Metastatic Urothelial Cancer
Erdafitinib, an oral pan-fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows promise as the first targeted agent for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer, one of the most common cancers (Source: Johnson and Johnson)
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Janssen Announces U.S. FDA Breakthrough Therapy Designation for Erdafitinib in the Treatment of Metastatic Urothelial Cancer
Erdafitinib, an oral pan-fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows promise as the first targeted agent for patients with metastatic urothelial cancer, one of the most common cancers RARITAN, N.J., March 15, 2018 -- (Healt... Biopharmaceuticals, Oncology, Urology, FDA Janssen Pharmaceutical, erdafitinib, Urothelial Cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Study: Doctors Who Prescribe More Opioids Make More Money
This study suggests that conflicts of interest with the pharmaceutical industry may influence oncologists in high-stakes treatment decisions for patients with cancer,” the authors concluded. Some studies have looked at whether the amount of money a doctor receives makes a difference. Studies by researchers at Yale University, the George Washington University Milken Institute of Public Health and Harvard Medical School have all found that the more money physicians are paid by pharmaceutical companies, the more likely they are to prescribe certain drugs. Dr. Patrice Harris, a spokeswoman for the American Medical Associ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Local TV opioid crisis opioids Source Type: news

What to eat when you've got cancer
Chemotherapy that targets cancer dramatically dulls taste and smell and can cause mouth ulcers, while drugs such as steroids can result in thrush in the mouth, making for painful meal times. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anti –Oral Mucositis Drug Granted Breakthrough Status
The FDA has granted Breakthrough Therapy and Fast Track designation to GC4419, for reduction of severe oral mucositis caused by radiation therapy. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: FDA Approval News Palliative and Supportive Care Source Type: news

Men are four times more likely to get cancer from oral sex
Dr Ashish Deshmukh, from the University of Florida, stated infected men struggle to rid their bodies of the cancer-causing human papillomavirus, causing them to harbour the pathogen. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ixazomib Triplet Combo Effective in R/R Myeloma
The oral therapy combination of ixazomib, pomalidomide, and dexamethasone was effective and well-tolerated in patients with myeloma that had relapsed or was refractory to lenalidomide. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - March 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Immuno Oncology Multiple Myeloma News Source Type: news

Non-smokers with oral precancerous lesions at increased risk of cancer
(University of British Columbia) Although tobacco use is still one of the strongest risk factors associated with mouth cancers, precancerous lesions in the mouths of non-smokers are more likely to progress to cancer than those in smokers, new research from the University of British Columbia has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health Highlights: March 2, 2018
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Jim Kelly's Cancer Returns NFL Hall of Fame quarterback Jim Kelly says his oral cancer has returned. In a statement released Thursday, Kelly... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Precision cancer therapy effective in both children and adults
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Three quarters of patients, both adults and children, with a variety of advanced cancers occurring in different sites of the body responded to larotrectinib, a novel therapy that targets a specific genetic mutation. Results of a phase 1/2 trial have been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Unlike most cancer therapies, this oral treatment is based on the genetic traits of the tumor and not the organ where the cancer originated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Can Alcohol Help You Live Longer? Here ’s What the Research Really Says
New research, which was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference, has found that moderate drinking is linked to a longer life. Drinking about two glasses of wine or beer a day was linked to an 18% drop in a person’s risk of early death—an even stronger effect than the life-preserving practice of exercise, according to the researchers. The results came from the 90+ Study, a research project out of the University of California Irvine’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders that examines the habits of people who live to at least 90. ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Academy of Laser Dentistry ’s Upcoming Annual Meeting Features an Abundance of Dental Team Training
Discussion:“Straight Talk on Diode Lasers: Scientific and Practical Rationale for Clinical Dentistry” moderated by Georgios Romanos, PhD, DDS. Periodontology, Stony Brook University“The more the dental team knows about laser technology and the business of dentistry, the better the health of your patients and practice, explains Siminovsky, “The ALD supports our valuable auxiliary team members with outstanding presenters and topics.”·      Lecture:“What to Say to Get the Pay- Coding, Billing, Scripting,” presented by Karen S. Parker, RDH, BSDH&mid...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 20, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

PharmaMar's lurbinectedin ATLANTIS trial in SCLC will be an oral presentation
(Pharmamar) PharmaMar's lurbinectedin will have an oral presentation on small-cell lung cancer at the 18th annual meeting on Targeted Therapies in Lung Cancer that is organized by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), to be held in Santa Monica Feb. 21-24. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Hidden poisons in your mouth cause cancer, arthritis, heart disease and more - Discover the most powerful ways to improve your oral health
(Natural News) Everyone knows that having healthy teeth and gums equal to a bright smile, but is that all there is to it? Turns out, it’s just the start. Having exceptional oral health means having more than just a beautiful smile — it’s directly linked to our overall health. The same principle works the other way too:... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Approves First Treatment for Nonmetastatic CRPC
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the oral agent apalutamide (Erleada) for the treatment of nonmetastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The oral androgen-receptor inhibitor is the first FDA-approved treatment for patients with nonmetastatic castration-resistant disease and the first to be approved based on the endpoint of metastasis-free survival. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - February 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Leah Lawrence Tags: Editorial Men ' s Health Prostate Cancer Source Type: news

Hidden poisons in your MOUTH may be causing cancer, arthritis, heart disease and even obesity
(Natural News) Each day, I review hundreds of science and medicine headlines for assigning stories to websites like Science.news and Medicine.news, and I repeatedly see new science papers published about the links between oral bacteria and chronic diseases such as heart disease. The science is clear: If you have bacteria lurking in an old root... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Gay and bisexual men will be offered the HPV jab
The NHS and Public Health England scheme, hoped to protect thousands of men from penile, anal and oral cancers, will begin in April, the Government has confirmed. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Lower Risk of Some Cancers With Oral Contraceptives Applies Across Lifestyles Lower Risk of Some Cancers With Oral Contraceptives Applies Across Lifestyles
Women who use oral contraceptives for at least a decade may be less likely to develop ovarian or endometrial malignancies, and this benefit doesn ’ t seem to be diminished by other lifestyle risk factors, a U.S. study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Lower risk of certain cancers with the Pill applies across lifestyles
(Reuters Health) - Women who use oral contraceptives for at least a decade may be less likely to develop ovarian or endometrial malignancies, and this benefit doesn ’t seem to be diminished by other lifestyle risk factors, a U.S. study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Oral HPV Infection Rate Is Alarmingly High in US Men Oral HPV Infection Rate Is Alarmingly High in US Men
A large population-based study argues for more rigorous efforts to vaccinate against HPV infection and prevent subsequent head and neck cancers, says Dr Markman.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

Smokers on the Pill cut ovarian cancer risk by 66 per cent
Researchers from the US National Cancer Institute discovered that  long-term use of oral contraceptives was associated with a 66 percent reduced risk of developing ovarian cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aster, a common garden flower in America that blooms in autumn, found to be effective at preventing malignant lip and mouth cancers
(Natural News) Because of the prevalence of the many different types of cancer, it’s always a good idea to consider what kind of alternative treatments are available to you, since it is known that they can also be quite effective. This applies to oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), which is said to be the sixth... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salivary biomarkers for oral cancer and pre-cancer screening: a review
ConclusionCombination approach of salivary biomarkers could be used as screening tool to improve early detection and diagnostic precision of oral pre-cancer and cancer.Clinical relevanceThe current findings are of importance for clinicians and researchers to mitigate the challenges in salivary-based diagnosis of oral cancer and to evaluate reliable, specific, and sensitive salivary biomarkers for oral pre-cancer and cancer diagnosis. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 19, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Quick Test Could Spot Precursor to Esophageal Cancer
FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 -- A pill-sized device that you swallow might help detect a change in the esophagus that can lead to a deadly form of cancer, researchers are reporting. The esophagus is the tube that carries food from your mouth to your... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 19, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Oral Contraceptives Reduce Risk for Ovarian and Endometrial Cancers
The effect is especially evident in smokers, the obese and those who exercise infrequently. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Smoking and Tobacco Birth Control and Family Planning Cancer Ovaries Source Type: news

Medical News Today: How gum disease could lead to cancer
How well do you look after your oral health? New research has now linked the bacteria responsible for gum disease with certain types of cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - January 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?
(Michigan State University) A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Vitamin deficiency we are all born with
I’ve admired Linus Pauling for years. In 1976, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist gave mega doses of vitamin C to 100 “untreatable” cancer patients. He then compared these so-called terminal patients to patients with the same kind of cancer who didn’t get vitamin C. The patients who received the traditional cancer treatment lived for an average of six months. Pauling’s patients lived — on average — for six years. You’d think that the medical community would have heralded Pauling’s research as a huge breakthrough in cancer treatment. But they didn’t. And they still ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - January 17, 2018 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Natural Cures Nutrition anti-cancer leukemia vitamin vitamin C Source Type: news

Dentists may soon start asking about your sex life
New research from the ‎University of South Florida College of Public Health say dentists should help reduce the rate of oral cancers by checking for symptoms of HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Oral health may have an important role in cancer prevention
(University of Helsinki) The bacteria that cause periodontitis, a disease affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, seems to play a part also in the onset of pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oral Microbiome Tied to H & N Cancer Risk (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- Lower incidence when Corynebacterium, Kingella spp. are abundant (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - January 15, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Medtronic Tweaks its New Pain Pump System
FDA approved a new clinician programmer for use with Medtronic's SynchroMed II intrathecal drug delivery system, an implantable pump that provides targeted drug delivery for patients suffering from chronic pain and severe spasticity. The new technology was designed to simplify therapy management for clinicians by providing them with visual tools and intuitive workflows. The SynchroMed II clinician programmer is a new application that can be used on a tablet and features visual enhancements for a side-by-side comparison of therapy changes. The new app also communicates wirelessly to the SynchroMed II pump with automate...
Source: MDDI - January 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Implants Source Type: news

NIDCR Autotherapies Symposium | Thurs., Jan. 25, 8:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page.   NIDCR invites you to a scientific symposium: "Autotherapies: Enhancing Our Innate Healing Capacity"  Thursday, January 25, 8:00 am-12:00 pm Lipsett Amphitheater in the NIH Clinical Center (Building 10)NIH Campus, Bethesda, Md. Autotherapies are treatments based on the body's natural ability to heal and protect itself. For example, immunotherapy harnesses the body’s immune cells to fight c...
Source: NIDCR Science News - January 11, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Athenex gets closer to clinical trials in China
Athenex Inc. (Nasdaq:ATNX) has taken another step forward in its efforts to bring an oral breast cancer drug to market in Asia.   The Buffalo-based biopharmaceutical firm received an acceptance from the Chinese Food& Drug Administration for an investigational new drug (IND) application for Oraxol, an oral version of its oral formulation of the chemotherapy formulation paclitaxel. It’s the next in a series of okays from FDA groups across the world, including the United States, South America,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 8, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Tracey Drury Source Type: news

UCLA volunteers provide free health care at downtown L.A. mega clinic
With the strongly held belief that access to health care should be available to everyone — not just the insured — nearly 200 volunteers from UCLA joined an effort to provide free services to more than 2,000 people at a three-day Care Harbor community clinic.“Los Angeles is still one of the leading areas of people without insurance or access to care and it’s a problem for the community,” said Dr. Patrick Dowling, professor and chair of the  UCLA Department of Family Medicine, who led the UCLA volunteer contingent at Care Harbor ’s seventh health care mega clinic. “I’...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 4, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news