Vigorous cool room treadmill training to improve walking ability in people with multiple sclerosis who use ambulatory assistive devices: a feasibility study - Devasahayam AJ, Chaves AR, Lasisi WO, Curtis ME, Wadden KP, Kelly LP, Pretty R, Chen A, Wallack EM, Newell CJ, Williams JB, Kenny H, Downer MB, McCarthy J, Moore CS, Ploughman M.

BACKGROUND: Aerobic training has the potential to restore function, stimulate brain repair, and reduce inflammation in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). However, disability, fatigue, and heat sensitivity are major barriers to exercise for people with MS...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

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Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Aerobic training has the potential to restore function, stimulate brain repair, and reduce inflammation in people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS). However, disability, fatigue, and heat sensitivity are major barr...
Source: BMC Neurology - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Research article Source Type: research
Abstract Myelin is a specialized membrane allowing for saltatory conduction of action potentials in neurons, an essential process to achieve the normal communication across the nervous system. Accordingly, in diseases characterized by the loss of myelin and myelin forming cells -oligodendrocytes in the CNS-, patients show severe neurological disabilities. After a demyelinated insult, microglia, astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells invade the lesioned area initiating a spontaneous process of myelin repair (i.e. remyelination). A preserved hallmark of this neuroinflammatory scenario is a local increase of ...
Source: Current Pharmaceutical Design - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Pharm Des Source Type: research
ConclusionsMSCs transplantation proved to be a safe and tolerable therapy. Their potential therapeutic benefits were also validated. However, larger placebo controlled blinded clinical trials will be required to establish the long term safety and efficacy profile of these therapies for MS. Their translation into the clinical practice can provide a new hope for the patients of this highly debilitating disease.
Source: Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
ConclusionWe found no indication of a prognostic value of WML shrinking in early MS patients. WML shrinking seems to be related to waning of acute inflammation.
Source: Brain and Behavior - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: ORIGINAL RESEARCH Source Type: research
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by heterogeneous clinical symptoms including gradual muscle weakness, fatigue, and cognitive impairment. The disease course of MS can be classified into a relapsing-remitting (RR) phase defined by periods of neurological disabilities, and a progressive phase where neurological decline is persistent. Pathologically, MS is defined by a destructive immunological and neuro-degenerative interplay. Current treatments largely target the inflammatory processes and slow disease progression at best. Therefore, there is an urg...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Neuroinflammation is a prominent pathological feature of all neuroimmunological diseases, including, but not limited to, multiple sclerosis (MS), myasthenia gravis, neuromyelitis optica, and Guillain–Barré syndrome. All currently-approved therapies for the treatment of these diseases focus on controlling or modulating the immune (innate and adaptive) responses to limit demyelination and neuronal damage. The primary purpose of this review is to detail the pre-clinical data and proposed mechanism of action of novel drugs currently in clinical trial, with a focus on novel compounds that promote repair and regener...
Source: Frontiers in Immunology - Category: Allergy & Immunology Source Type: research
Abstract Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) comprises 2-5% of MS cases, and is known to be associated with high disease activity and the accumulation of disability at an earlier age than their adult-onset counterparts. Appropriate therapy leading to disease control has the potential to alter the known trajectory of adverse long-term physical, cognitive, and psychosocial outcomes in this population. Thus, optimizing treatment for children and adolescents with MS is of paramount importance. The last decade has seen a growing number of disease-modifying therapies approved for relapsing MS in adults, and availabl...
Source: Paediatric Drugs - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Paediatr Drugs Source Type: research
AbstractPediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (MS) comprises 2 –5% of MS cases, and is known to be associated with high disease activity and the accumulation of disability at an earlier age than their adult-onset counterparts. Appropriate therapy leading to disease control has the potential to alter the known trajectory of adverse long-term physical, cognitiv e, and psychosocial outcomes in this population. Thus, optimizing treatment for children and adolescents with MS is of paramount importance. The last decade has seen a growing number of disease-modifying therapies approved for relapsing MS in adults, and available ...
Source: Pediatric Drugs - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
This article summarizes recent advances in the identification of genetic and environmental factors that affect the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) and the pathogenic processes involved in acute relapses and relapse-independent disability progression. RECENT FINDINGS The number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with increased risk of MS has increased to more than 200 variants. The evidence for the association of Epstein-Barr virus infection, vitamin D deficiency, obesity, and smoking with increased risk of MS has further accumulated, and, in cases of obesity and vitamin D deficiency, the evidence f...
Source: CONTINUUM: Lifelong Learning in Neurology - Category: Neurology Tags: REVIEW ARTICLES Source Type: research
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