An obese patient with acute cholecystitis, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis; A case report

ConclusionLaparoscopic cholecystostomy was effective in this obese patient with acute cholecystitis and NASH cirrhosis. Using a low-carbohydrate diet with exercise, her weight decreased, and subsequent open cholecystectomy was uneventful.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research

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Authors: Wu H, Chang C, Lu Q Abstract Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a life-threatening autoimmune disease that is characterized by dysregulated dendritic cells, T and B cells, and abundant autoantibodies. The pathogenesis of lupus remains unclear. However, increasing evidence has shown that environment factors, genetic susceptibilities, and epigenetic regulation contribute to abnormalities in the immune system. In the past decades, several risk gene loci have been identified, such as MHC and C1q. However, genetics cannot explain the high discordance of lupus incidence in homozygous twins. Environmental fact...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
Authors: Mu Z, Zhang J Abstract Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is a common inflammatory disease with a genetic background. The prevalence of AD has been increasing in many countries. AD patients often have manifestations of pruritus, generalized skin dryness, and eczematous lesions. The pathogenesis of AD is complicated. The impaired skin barrier and immune imbalance play significant roles in the development of AD. Environmental factors such as allergens and pollutants are associated with the increasing prevalence. Many genetic and environmental factors induce a skin barrier deficiency, and this can lead to immune imbalanc...
Source: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology - Category: Research Tags: Adv Exp Med Biol Source Type: research
In South Africa, little is known about alcohol consumption patterns, such as drinks consumed, container size, salience of alcohol price, affordability and availability, and perceptions of alcohol policies as potential predictors of heavy episodic alcohol (...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
Alcohol Damage to the Liver – What Happens? Alcohol use disorder and heavy drinking present many harmful health risks. They can include everything from high blood pressure to fatal seizures. One of the most well-known health risks that come along with prolonged heavy drinking is liver damage. How does alcohol impact the liver, and what types of alcohol damage to the liver are there? In order to better understand alcohol damage to the liver, it is important to learn how the liver processes alcohol. According to MyDr, there are 2 ways that alcohol can be processed by your liver: Most alcohol is broken down, or metabol...
Source: Cliffside Malibu - Category: Addiction Authors: Tags: Alcohol Alcohol Rehab Information Alcoholism Detox Resources for Alcohol and Drugs/Opiates alcohol abuse alcohol dependence alcohol detox alcohol treatment alcohol treatment center alcohol treatment facility Source Type: blogs
ConclusionLaparoscopic cholecystostomy was effective in this obese patient with acute cholecystitis and NASH cirrhosis. Using a low-carbohydrate diet with exercise, her weight decreased, and subsequent open cholecystectomy was uneventful.
Source: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Follow me on Twitter @RobShmerling Ever wonder what other people are wondering about? I know I do. So, here are the top 10 health searches in Google for 2017. And just so you don’t have to look each one up, I’ve provided a brief answer. You’re welcome. 1.  What causes hiccups? I was surprised this one made it to the top 10 list of health searches. Maybe this search is common because hiccups are as mysterious as they are universal. I’ve written about hiccups before, but let’s just say the cause in any individual person is rarely known or knowable. Then again, the reason hiccups stop is als...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Source Type: blogs
Conclusion Persistence of signs and symptoms of peritonitis despite improvement in ascitic fluid analysis in cirrhotic patients treated for or early relapse of peritonitis with the same organism should prompt the physician to evaluate for secondary peritonitis and surgical management should be considered for potentially correctable sources.
Source: IDCases - Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: research
Discussion It is estimated that 180 million people worldwide are infected with Hepatitis C (HCV) which includes ~11 million children. In the United States it is estimated that there were 30,500 acute HCV cases in 2014, and 2.7-3.9 million people with chronic HCV. Many infections are not identified. It is estimated that “…only 5-15% of HCV-infected children in the United States are identified.” Problems associated with HCV include acute hepatitis (including fever, malaise, dark-urine, abdominal pain, jaundice, appetite loss, nausea, emesis, clay-colored stools), acute fulminant hepatitis (not common in c...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - Category: Pediatrics Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news
The news that mortality is increasing among middle-aged white Americans spread like wildfire last week (see here and here and here) thanks to a study by Anne Case and Angus Deaton, who recently won the Nobel Prize in Economics. As researchers who study the social determinants of health, we were very pleased to see such widespread interest in this urgent national problem. Unfortunately, there are a couple of pieces of the puzzle that we think the Case and Deaton study missed. By not looking at men and women separately, Case and Deaton failed to see that rising mortality is especially pronounced among women. The au...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Equity and Disparities Featured Population Health Public Health alcohol abuse drug abuse low-income women mortality rates safety net programs Social Determinants of Health Women's Health Source Type: blogs
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