Supervised exercise training and increased physical activity to reduce cardiovascular disease risk in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: study protocol for a randomized controlled feasibility trial

DiscussionPCOS is associated with various increased risk factors for CVD, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation. Whether oxidised LDL has a role in this increased risk is not yet known. The present study aims to measure the feasibility of implementing structured exercise training and/or increased lifestyle physical activity in women with PCOS, so that a subsequent adequately powered RCT can be designed. The results from the study will be used to refine the interventions and determine the acceptability of the study design. A limitation is that some self-monitoring in the lifestyle physical activity group may not be reliable or replicable, for example inputting information about time spent cleaning/gardening.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov,NCT03678714. Registered 20 September 2018.
Source: Trials - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials

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We examined the effects of the independent and combined effects of Zataria Multiflora supplementation and circuit resistance training (CRT) on selected adipokines among postmenopausal women. Forty-eight postmenopausal women were divided into four groups: Exercise (EG, n = 12), Zataria Multiflora (ZMG, n = 12), exercise and Zataria Multiflora (ZMEG, n = 12), and control (CG, n = 12). Participants in experimental groups either performed CRT (3 sessions per week with intensity at 55% of one-repetition maximum) or supplemented with Zataria Multiflora (500 mg every day after breakfast with 100 ml of water), or their combination...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
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Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized heart health Source Type: news
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Source: Current Vascular Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: Tags: Curr Vasc Pharmacol Source Type: research
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Source: Life in a Medical Center - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Health Tips Women's Health fertility Katrina Mark obgyn UMMC Source Type: blogs
Abstract Postmenopausal women (PMW) who have had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and chronic hyperandrogenemia may be at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease than normo-androgenemic PMW. The cardiometabolic effect of chronic hyperandrogenemia in women with PCOS after menopause is unclear. The present study was performed to test the hypothesis that chronic hyperandrogenemia in aging female rats would have more deleterious effects on metabolic function, blood pressure, and renal function than in normo-androgenemic age-matched females. Female Sprague Dawley were implanted continuously, beginning at 4-5 weeks, w...
Source: Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: Endocrinology Source Type: research
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Source: American Family Physician - Category: Primary Care Authors: Tags: Am Fam Physician Source Type: research
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Source: Menopause - Category: OBGYN Tags: Original Articles Source Type: research
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Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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Source: Reproduction - Category: Reproduction Medicine Authors: Tags: Reviews Source Type: research
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Source: Maturitas - Category: Primary Care Authors: Source Type: research
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