Opioids for chronic osteoarthritis pain: An updated systematic review and meta ‐analysis of efficacy, tolerability and safety in randomized placebo‐controlled studies of at least 4 weeks double‐blind duration

ConclusionsTolerability of opioids is low and efficacy is not clinically relevant in controlled studies from 4 to 24  weeks for osteoarthritis pain.SignificanceWithin the context of randomized controlled trials (4 –24 weeks), opioids provided no clinically relevant pain relief and no clinically relevant reduction in disability compared with placebo in chronic osteoarthritis pain (hip, knee). Number needed to treat for an additional dropout due to side effects was 5 (95% confidence interval 4–7). Two stud ies found no signals of abuse and addiction. The frequency of serious adverse events including deaths did not differ from placebo.
Source: European Journal of Pain - Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Tags: REVIEW ARTICLE Source Type: research

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We describe the most highly recommended generic and disease-specific PRO tools in SCD and discuss the challenges of incorporating them in clinical practice. EXPERT OPINION: PRO measures are essential to incorporate into SCD clinical trials either as primary or secondary outcomes. The use of PRO measures in SCD facilitates a patient-centered approach, which is likely to lead to improved outcomes. Significant challenges remain in adapting PRO tools to routine clinical use and in developing countries. PMID: 33034214 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: Expert Review of Hematology - Category: Hematology Tags: Expert Rev Hematol Source Type: research
Currently in fellowship doing bread/butter procedures (MBB, epidurals, PNB, few SCS/PNS trials, etc.) and just interviewed at a private practice spot where they do a lot of procedures that I will have not done any training in prior to graduating (e.g. IT pump, SI fusion, Vertiflex, Kypho, MILD, Discectomy, lots of SCS/PNS trials etc) and significant amount of "OR pain procedures" at a very busy practice seeing 30-40 pts/day - how many of you are commonly performing these procedures and are... private practice concern
Source: Student Doctor Network - Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: Tags: Pain Medicine Source Type: forums
CONCLUSION: The nurse practitioner workforce offers stability and flexibility in working across multiple clinical settings in primary healthcare. They provide the potential solution to the general practitioner workforce shortage by improving access to primary healthcare and reducing health inequalities. As authorised prescribers able to enrol patients, receive capitation payments and claim general medical services, it is timely to facilitate the expansion of the nurse practitioner workforce in New Zealand. PMID: 33032301 [PubMed - in process]
Source: New Zealand Medical Journal - Category: General Medicine Tags: N Z Med J Source Type: research
Publication date: October 2020Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, Volume 89Author(s): Fernando Lopes, Fernando A. Vicentini, Nina L. Cluny, Alexander J. Mathews, Benjamin H. Lee, Wagdi A. Almishri, Lateece Griffin, William Gonçalves, Vanessa Pinho, Derek M. McKay, Simon A. Hirota, Mark G. Swain, Quentin J. Pittman, Keith A. Sharkey
Source: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
If you have chronic arthritis pain, you may be wondering about cannabidiol (CBD) as a treatment. CBD, along with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other chemicals, is found in marijuana. But unlike THC, CBD is not “psychoactive” — that is, it does not cause the intoxication or high associated with marijuana use. There’s a good chance you’ve tried it already: according to a Gallup poll in August of 2019, about 14% of Americans report using CBD products, and the number one reason is pain. The Arthritis Foundation conducted its own poll and found that 29% reported current use of CBD (mostly ...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Complementary and alternative medicine Drugs and Supplements Marijuana Pain Management Source Type: blogs
Publication date: Available online 30 June 2018Source: Pharmacological ResearchAuthor(s): Jabeen Haleem DarakhshanAbstractChronic pain conditions such as low back pain and osteoarthritis are the most prominent causes of disability worldwide. Morphine and other opioid drugs are the gold standard treatment for severe pain, including surgical pain, but the use of these drugs for chronic pain is limited largely because long term use of these drugs is associated with drug abuse and hyperalgesia which produces a negative impact on the treatment. Non-addictive treatments for chronic pain are, therefore, highly needed. Commonly us...
Source: Pharmacological Research - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
The United States is struggling to deal with an opioid epidemic that is damaging lives, resulting in overdoses, and yet not reducing chronic pain. National initiatives are underway to dramatically reduce access to prescription opioids, but these efforts lack a systematic approach to provide alternative treatments for these patients. Policy changes are urgently needed to provide better care for patients with chronic pain, and in this post, we outline three feasible policy initiatives. Innovative reimbursement initiatives by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) could frame and stimulate use of evidence-based ...
Source: Health Affairs Blog - Category: Health Management Authors: Tags: Drugs and Medical Technology Health Professionals Public Health Quality chronic pain Opioid Addiction opioids Source Type: blogs
Over the last year, the general public has been inundated with a steady stream of reports about the dangers of opiates — pain medicines like codeine, Percocet, and OxyContin. The harm in terms of ruined lives and death from illicit drugs such as heroin is not news. But what is new, and concerning, are the risks of prescription pain medicines — those doctors prescribe for pain due to a range of causes, including musculoskeletal problems like low back pain. The history of using opiates for chronic pain Back pain isn’t a new problem either, but the history of how doctors have treated it is probably new to ma...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Addiction Back Pain Behavioral Health Pain Management Source Type: news
Osteoarthritis (OA) affects tens of millions of Americans and is a leading cause of disability and reduced quality of life across the globe. Other than joint replacement surgery, there is no known “cure” for OA, and most treatments focus on relief of symptoms such as pain. Often, the first step is non-medication-based approaches such as physical therapy, exercise, and weight loss. Most patients, however, will eventually use pain relievers such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Other kinds of medication, such as opioids, have also been tested as treatments for OA, and there is ongoing debate abo...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Arthritis Drugs and Supplements Health Osteoarthritis Pain Management Source Type: news
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